Tools of the Trade: Chef Tara Trevethan

Chef Tara Trevethan demonstrates how she uses the Forschner curved fork to dig in to the bone and steady the Porterhouse steak on the platter, and simultaneously uses the Forschner boning knife to separate the meat from the bone.

Jenine C. Ouillette/Special to the Eagle

Chef Tara Trevethan demonstrates how she uses the Forschner curved fork to dig in to the bone and steady the Porterhouse steak on the platter, and simultaneously uses the Forschner boning knife to separate the meat from the bone.

Chef Tara Trevethan demonstrates how she uses the Forschner curved fork to dig in to the bone and steady the Porterhouse steak on the platter, and simultaneously uses the Forschner boning knife to separate the meat from the bone.

Jenine C. Ouillette/Special to the Eagle

Chef Tara Trevethan demonstrates how she uses the Forschner curved fork to dig in to the bone and steady the Porterhouse steak on the platter, and simultaneously uses the Forschner boning knife to separate the meat from the bone.

Tara Steak and Lobster House

969 North Collier Boulevard, Marco

Tara Steak & Lobster House, 969 N. Collier Blvd., Marco Island. Phone: 394-0212

Q: What is your favorite kitchen gizmo — the one you reach for most of the time?

A: Actually, I have two gizmo’s — my Forschner six-inch knife and my Forschner curved meat fork that I use simultaneously — the curved fork tines dig in to the bone and steady the Porterhouse steak on the platter so that I can use the knife to separate the meat from the bone. We then slice the meat on that special platter and put it back into the finishing broiler. This finishes the steak to the guest’s desired degree of doneness. The Buffalo China platters we use are especially made to withstand the extreme temperatures in the finishing broiler. Incidentally, here in our kitchen we have commercial broilers that attain temperatures equal or better than home charcoal grills because we are one of a few Marco Island restaurants that have a direct gas line into the kitchen. Here are a few tips for achieving professional results on your home grill.

Tara’s Steak and Lobster House top tips for grilling steak:

Start with a good cut of meat — the best beef is darker in color and marbled with fat; Buy thicker steaks — 1¼ to 2 inches thick allows the meat to sear on the outside without being over done on the inside. Fire up the grill — you want a hot fire for the fat marbling to melt in and flavor the beef. Use the right tools — brush the grill grate with vegetable oil or use non-stick cooking spray before firing up the grill to prevent sticking while grilling. Use spring-loaded tongs or long handled tools and barbecue mitts to protect yourself and to turn the steaks without losing the juices. Use an instant thermometer to avoid overcooking; Finally, pull your steaks off the grill a little under the desired temperature. Let the steaks rest on a platter loosely covered with foil. The steaks will continue to cook and re-absorb the flavorful juices — if you don’t allow them to rest at least 5 minutes the juices will spill out on your dinner plate.

Where to buy it:

Commercial Glass & Restaurant Supply, Inc. 4027 Arnold Ave., Naples. Phone: 643-0177, www.commercialglass&restaurantsupply.com or www.CutleryAndMore.com

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