On the Town: Un poco of everything

DON FARMER
Gail Fox, a ranger at Everglades National Park, holds the Senior Pass. It costs $10 and with it, citizens 62 and over get into national parks at no charge.

Photo by CHRIS CURLE // Buy this photo

Gail Fox, a ranger at Everglades National Park, holds the Senior Pass. It costs $10 and with it, citizens 62 and over get into national parks at no charge.

Gail Fox, a ranger at Everglades National Park, holds the Senior Pass. It costs $10 and with it, citizens 62 and over get into national parks at no charge.

Photo by CHRIS CURLE // Buy this photo

Gail Fox, a ranger at Everglades National Park, holds the Senior Pass. It costs $10 and with it, citizens 62 and over get into national parks at no charge.

A dead bolt lock can be hard enough to install by an amateur, but when the instructions with the lock are only in Spanish, a monolingual customer has a problem.

Photo by CHRIS CURLE // Buy this photo

A dead bolt lock can be hard enough to install by an amateur, but when the instructions with the lock are only in Spanish, a monolingual customer has a problem.

En ingles por favor!

Everybody makes mistakes and merchandise packaging can be frustrating at times. No more so than when my wife bought a dead bolt lock at ACE Hardware on East Elkcam Circle.

When she opened the package containing the lock, made in China by the way, she checked the instructions on how to install it on a door. To her dismay, the detailed instructions were only in Spanish. No English.

ACE Hardware employees rushed to rectify the problem when she took the lock and its packaging back to the store. They found English directions in another package and gave them to my wife.

“The ACE people were great,” she says, “and clearly it wasn’t our local store’s fault.” Still, it is a reminder (like we need one) of how much of what we buy and use around the house is made in other countries. Now I am wondering about that hallway door. What if it came from Taiwan? Might it not work well with a Communist Chinese lock?

Who knew world politics might collide in our back hallway?

Seniors’ big break

If I told you I know of a way for you, or at least some of you, to visit any federal recreation site in the country for a one-time fee of $10, would you be interested?

By recreation sites I mean national parks as well as other facilities. The ten-buck admission is a lifetime pass for US citizens and permanent residents age 62 and over. But wait, there’s more.

The pass admits the pass holder and up to three other adults in a non-commercial vehicle. Children under 16 get in free anyway.

This senior pass also provides a 50 percent discount on some expanded amenity fees, such as camping, swimming, boat launches and more.

These $10 passes can only be obtained in person at a national park or recreational area. The closest one I know of to Marco Island is at the Gulf Coast Visitor Center in Everglades City. For more, go on the Internet to www.nps.gov/fees_passes.htm. Or phone the park rangers office at 695-3311.

Day at the castle — for a good cause

King Richard’s Family Fun Park in Naples is having a special day tomorrow to benefit Youth Haven, our area’s emergency shelter for abused and neglected children.

It’s “Children’s Day at the Castle,” a chance for families to enjoy the use of unlimited rider bands which are being made available for $15.50 each offering unlimited use of all the castle’s outside attractions. This special pricing is valid from 1 to 5 p.m. only. One dollar from the sale of each wristband will go to support the children of Youth Haven.

Other fun stuff will include free cookies from Costco, a “Gymnastic World” attraction, free fingerprinting by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, free height and weight checks by Physicians’ Regional Hospital, smoothies from Plant Smoothie — with part of the price going to Youth Haven and $15 family portraits by artist Tony Duca.

King Richard’s is located at 6780 North Airport Pulling Road in Naples. For more information, call 774-2904 or log onto www.youthhaven.net.

“Politics ain’t beanbag”

Several readers of my Naples Daily news column last week asked where I got the expression I used in the last line of the piece, “Politics Isn’t Beanbag.” I stole it, along with millions of other people who’ve enjoyed and repeated it for about a century. It was coined by writer Finley Peter Dunne (1867 – 1936) a prominent writer and newspaperman in Chicago.

Dunne, a favorite of Teddy Roosevelt, has a lot of other witty quotes to his credit. A few:

“Trust everybody, but cut the cards.” (That could have been the origin of the famous Ronald Reagan saying, “Trust, but verify.”)

“A fanatic is a man who does what he thinks the Lord would do if He knew the facts of the case.”

“Most vegetarians look so much like the food they eat that they can be classified as cannibals.”

“Swearing was invented as a compromise between running away and fighting.”

“If you go to the zoo, always take something to feed the animals, even if the signs say ‘Do Not Feed Animals’. It wasn’t the animals that put them signs up.” (That one was used in the classic movie, Forrest Gump.)

I’ll share more of Mr. Dunne’s witticisms in future columns.

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Don Farmer has been a full-time Marco Islander for ten years and a part-time resident for more than 30 years. He says full-time is better. Farmer welcomes your ideas for column items via e-mail at don@donfarmer.com.

© 2008 marconews.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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