Emergency light sensors installed at city intersections

Contractor James Snyder of Kent Technologies, a subcontractor for Opticom, fishes wire through a conduit pipe at the intersection of N. Collier Boulevard and the Esplanade as part of the installation of the remote relay sensor system that activates red lights in the path of emergency vehicles. Installation will continue with the island's traffic signals for another week.

Photo by BERNADETTE LA PAGLIA // Buy this photo

Contractor James Snyder of Kent Technologies, a subcontractor for Opticom, fishes wire through a conduit pipe at the intersection of N. Collier Boulevard and the Esplanade as part of the installation of the remote relay sensor system that activates red lights in the path of emergency vehicles. Installation will continue with the island's traffic signals for another week.

Contractor James Snyder of Kent Technologies, a subcontractor for Opticom, fishes wire through a conduit pipe at the intersection of N. Collier Boulevard and the Esplanade as part of the installation of the remote relay sensor system that activates red lights in the path of emergency vehicles. Installation will continue with the island's traffic signals for another week.

Photo by BERNADETTE LA PAGLIA // Buy this photo

Contractor James Snyder of Kent Technologies, a subcontractor for Opticom, fishes wire through a conduit pipe at the intersection of N. Collier Boulevard and the Esplanade as part of the installation of the remote relay sensor system that activates red lights in the path of emergency vehicles. Installation will continue with the island's traffic signals for another week.

Over the next week throughout Marco, technicians will be installing a remote relay sensor system at each of the eight traffic light intersections as a coordinate to the signals of emergency vehicles.

Its purpose is to optimize the ease and expediency of travel for emergency vehicles in times of crisis.

Whereas the present system is dependent upon the vigilance of the driver to immediately pull over to the side of the road upon hearing the siren, the new system transcends those concerns. Once the signal activates, the traffic light in its path automatically turns red, thus stopping all traffic flow and allowing the emergency vehicle to pass freely.

The signals are being installed as part of the Traffic Control Devices Citywide (Opticom) Project. The $248,000 contract was awarded by City Council to Kent Technologies in October. Grants totaling $133,000 were secured by the city to help cover engineering and construction costs.

“This will level the playing field for the drivers in emergency transport because they won’t have to second guess whether a car is going to pull over to let them pass. The traffic lights will be coordinated with the relay to turn red,” explained James Snyder, a contractor for Kent Technologies. “Those few extra minutes could make the difference between life and death -— and arriving safely at a destination.”

Snyder estimated that the system on Marco will be operational by the end of the month.

“Eventually, the system will be installed at all major intersections throughout Collier and Lee counties,” he said.

With additional reporting by staff writer Leslie Williams

© 2008 marconews.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Comments » 4

happy6 writes:

you have to be kidding..let's see there are appx 12 traffic lights on the island...maybe a few more...i find it interesting that the new lamposts are already being sanded and refinished after only one year...

15yearsmarco writes:

$30,000 per intersection for installing a remote relay sensor? Who was the low bidder?

15yearsmarco writes:

$30,000 per intersection for installing a remote relay sensor? Who was the low bidder?

enoughalready writes:

Maybe if people were considerate enough, the City would not have had to spend $248,000. When emergency vehicles are approaching, it is very safe, easy and inexpensive to just give them the space they need; but in today's society, an individual driver's concerns, destination and/or selfishness is the rule. It would be nice if any one of those drivers would stop to realize that maybe the emergency vehicles are responding to their house or family member.

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