On the Town: Lots happening on the town

Our Publix stores have machines available that allow customers to turn in coins for paper money. Just pour in the change and take a receipt to get bills. But it’s not free.

Photo by CHRIS CURLE, Special to the Eagle // Buy this photo

Our Publix stores have machines available that allow customers to turn in coins for paper money. Just pour in the change and take a receipt to get bills. But it’s not free.

Our Publix stores have machines available that allow customers to turn in coins for paper money. Just pour in the change and take a receipt to get bills. But it’s not free.

Photo by CHRIS CURLE, Special to the Eagle // Buy this photo

Our Publix stores have machines available that allow customers to turn in coins for paper money. Just pour in the change and take a receipt to get bills. But it’s not free.

Got loose change? Take it to Publix

I may be the last person on Marco to know about this, but it’s a nifty addition that may be helpful.

Marco’s two Publix stores now have machines that convert coins to bills, so to speak.

It’s simple. You take all those coins that you’ve been promising to take to the bank some day, to the Publix. You put the coins in the machine, which sorts and separates them and prints a receipt for you.

You take the receipt to the customer service counter and collect your paper cash, minus an eight percent fee for the service.

Here’s a thought — Ask Publix whether they have the new, more colorful, more security-protected five dollar bills, out just yesterday. If Publix doesn’t have the new bills today, they should get them soon.

Fiddler?

Dave Rice of Total Home services sends this anecdote about how the best plans sometimes go wrong. It’s also a good example of how a company can turn a mistake into new business.

“An elderly lady called and said one of my men was on her roof and she didn’t know why. I went to the house and found that my employee had misread the address and was pressure cleaning the wrong roof. He was about half done. So we completed cleaning her roof and credited her with a complimentary roof cleaning. She was so happy that she then became a regular Total Home Services customer.”

Time to toast, roast and boast

A big event tor a local man who is bigger than life is set for March 20, at the Marriott Hotel on Marco Beach.

He is Stan Gober, who has set the standard for fun on Sunday afternoons (and other times too of course) in Goodland for many years.

The event, at 6:30 p.m., is a fundraiser to benefit the Marco Y. Tickets at $150 and corporate tables at $2000 are on sale at the Y, at Stan’s and the Island Woman store in Goodland.

Hot off the, um, internet?

As a “recovering journalist,” I’ve been complaining for years about the obvious and blatant liberal bias of the so-called mainstream media — the major TV networks, newspapers and news magazines.

It is much worse than when my wife and I reported the news on CNN and ABC News. Still some people working in, what Rush Limbaugh calls the “drive-by” media, deny a liberal bent. What a joke!

Now comes a survey by the respected Zogby Interactive online poll, showing most Americans don’t trust major news media as they once did.

The poll found that 78 percent of Americans believe traditional journalism is out of touch. And about 64 percent say they’re dissatisfied with the quality of journalism in their communities.

The Reuters report on the Zogby poll that says that almost half of the people who responded said their primary source of news and information is the Internet now, up from about 40 percent a year ago.

Fewer than a third use TV to get their news and about 11 percent count on radio, 10 percent on newspapers. As in most surveys, the trend is more important than the exact numbers.

Reliance on the Internet is higher among younger people than among seniors. The survey says more than half who grew up with the Internet, ages 18 to 29, get most of their news and information online. Among those of us over 65, about 65 percent get informed from the “old” media: TV, newspapers and radio.

So what about those of us who use the Internet to access Web sites of “old” media outlets, such as Fox News or CNN or the Naples Daily News?

I guess we are hybrids. And that seems a trendy thing to be these days.

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Don Farmer has been a full-time Marco Islander for ten years and a part-time resident for more than 30 years. He says full-time is better. Farmer welcomes your ideas for column items via e-mail at don@donfarmer.com.

© 2008 marconews.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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