Island Arts: Art League hosts Phyllis Pransky

Read more in Sunday’s Etc on Phyllis Pransky.

There are many artistic interpretations of the landmark Judge S.S. Jolley Bridge that connects Marco Island to the mainland. This is how Phyllis Pransky sees it.

Photo by QUENTIN ROUX, Staff

There are many artistic interpretations of the landmark Judge S.S. Jolley Bridge that connects Marco Island to the mainland. This is how Phyllis Pransky sees it.

Luminous, opalescent, romantic are the words local artist Phyllis Pransky uses to describe “the poems she sees,” her oil paintings.

The Art League Marco Island’s Center for the Arts hosts Phyllis Pransky as the artist in residence for the month of June. What exactly does this mean? Essentially, it is an opportunity for an artist to be featured or highlighted at the Center for the Arts; for Pransky it involves a special exhibition of 12 of her original oil paintings.

Phyllis was on hand at the first of three summer events that the Center for the Arts is hosting, the Summer Wine & Art Series. Each month through August, the Center will host a different artist in residence. As a community we all like to get to know our neighbors a little better. Since the Art League is a great asset in your community and makes up a community within the community, I thought to myself you need to meet your neighbor!

So during this summer I will dedicate three columns with the intent to share some insight into each of the featured artists’ aspirations and exhibition using their words. The words may intrigue you to take on any opportunity for yourself and see the visual aspects of their inspirations. At the very least they will inform you about a fellow member of your community and their contribution to our community.

Marco Island resident Phyllis Pransky states, “My highest goal: to bring my paintings to life. I aim to capture what inspires me the most, the romantic, natural, luminous, opalescent, healing light of Southwest Florida. When I am in the process of painting I am actually meditating on the beauty and phenomenon of light falling, flowing, cascading, skipping, or bouncing on my subject and I am completely at peace.”

An American painter educated in the Principles of Fine Art, Pransky’s paintings are executed in oil using the alla prima technique; the method of direct and immediate painting.

Phyllis states “My philosophy is that a good painter can paint anything light falls upon; therefore my subject matter is varied.”

As a plein air artist, the act of painting outdoors or on location, Pransky’s body of work includes landscapes, seascapes, cityscapes, marine paintings and florals. As a studio artist, Pransky also enjoys creating the still life, the process in which the artist determines the actual subject matter and performs the setup or arrangement to her liking. She will also use the studio as an opportunity to study her plein air works and perhaps use this time for enhancements where she as the artist may interpret.

As for her portraits, Phyllis states they are “a wonderful challenge when painted from life.” However, on the other side of the challenge there exists the schedule of the model. If the model cannot return for additional sittings, Pransky will work from photos that she snaps herself.

I find that many visitors to art galleries are curious about what is involved in completing a piece or how long it might take. When considering the time that is involved with creating a painting from start to finish, Phyllis commented, “A painting can be completed in one session, one week, one month, one year or even years.” The completion is solely dependent on her appraisal of when it is finished.

As with any exhibition of art, I always want to know first hand if possible, what is the thought process of the artist. I can always make my own summation, but to hear from the artist their own verbal expression is a unique opportunity. Pransky puts it this way, “I trust the viewer will recognize the meditative quality of each painting and hopefully accept my invitation to enter the scene. My paint brush aims at the viewer’s heart as well as their intellect, but mostly I hope to bring an increased awareness of the beauty of Southwest Florida and its very special light.”

To mirror Pransky, I too hope you will accept the invitation to enter the scene, visit and view these 12 works for yourself. Just remember, summer days are here and with it comes change. New hours for the Art League are 1 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday.

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