Updated POLL & BLOG: Marco City Council supports high school in the park

Letter of intent is no commitment, city officials say

Article Highlights

  • Blog posted live Monday follows story
  • Not all sure a charter high school on Marco is a go, but Council approves idea of school in the park
  • Despite plans to open the school in 2011, proponents acknowledge more planning and work needs to be done

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Proposed charter high school campus plans at Marco's Mackle Park.

Submitted City of Marco Island

Proposed charter high school campus plans at Marco's Mackle Park.

— Proponents of a charter high school on Marco Island did not receive many nods of approval from the Collier County School District over the past several months, but as of Monday morning, they had the support of City Council— moral support anyway.

Organizers of the proposed public charter school, who created the nonprofit organization Marco Island Discovery Center (MIDC), proposed building their green campus at Mackle Park.

City Council unanimously agreed to support exploring building the school in the park.

“Finding land has been the biggest hurdle,” said Marco Island Discovery Center President Jane Watt.

The goal is to apply for the charter school through the Collier County School District and state by August 2010 and to open the school by 2011, Watt said.

Grants, donations and naming rights for classrooms are to be the primary sources of money to pay for the school.

“There is tons of money available through grants,” Watt said.

Discovery Center Vice President Tara Hagan said it was too early to estimate the cost for the school.

City Council Chairman Rob Popoff said that council’s support was not a rubber stamp to build a school at the park, but rather would allow exploration of the idea and potentially help the proponents receive grants.

“They still have a long way to go.”

Hagan also acknowledged the challenges ahead.

“MIDC is fully aware that making this dream a reality is going to be a difficult task, however it would be a disservice to the community not to fully explore this option and all the great ideas we have received from the community,” she said.

President of the Marco Island Parks and Recreation Foundation Terri DiSciullo raised several questions about whether the school and park would fit well together. She questioned parking capacity and school grant potential if council’s letter of intent came without a firm commitment from the city to share the land.

Collier County School District officials said in August that there wasn’t a need for the school based on student enrollment and enrollment continues to decrease.

If 100 percent of all Marco’s currently enrolled students at the Marco Island Charter Middle School were retained, the school would open with 430 children, Hagan reported.

“If 50 percent were retained, we’d open in 2011 with 215 kids, which is average for a charter school around the country.”

Councilman Ted Forcht said many of his constituents who support Lely High School are opposed to the new school.

Deed restrictions affect permissible land use almost everywhere on Island, except Old Marco.

Marco Island Civic Association board member Steve Stefanides said MICA, which holds the information on deed restrictions set by the Island’s developer, Deltona Corporation, was not informed of the plans. Deed restrictions designate the park land for recreational use and Watt said she wasn’t aware of that until Saturday.

Stefanides said it’s possible that recreational and educational purposes could be combined, but that the deed restrictions need to be reviewed.

The city could remove the deed restrictions by condemning the property.

Stefanides said condemnation might divide the community on an otherwise positive endeavor of building an innovative school.

“Our goal all along has been to be inclusive of everyone,” Watt said.

Monte Lazarus, of the Planning Board and Mackle Park master plan committee, supported the school.

“This is a unique opportunity to do something that has not been done in Collier County or in many places in the State of Florida. This is a very interesting institution that has been proposed.”

Ecologically, environmentally and educationally the project is worthwhile, Lazarus added.

“The land use is absolutely consistent with the planning of Mackle Park in my opinion.”

Councilman Jerry Gibson said the idea may help the city fund the park’s master plan as school proponents have said they would pay for all expenses.

The school will offer athletic programs and the curriculum is to focus on science, sustainable living and lifelong learning for the entire community, school planners say.

DiSciullo questioned school safety requirements, adequate physical education facilities and limiting public enjoyment of the park.

“I don’t have an objection to the letter of intent of the city working with the school ... we have a lack of green space as it is,” DiSciullo said.

Watt said she understood there were issues to address, but sought to get council’s letter of intent to share the park with the charter high school.

Vice Chairman Frank Recker said the letter of intent is like saying “knock yourself out” and doesn’t commit the city to anything.

“This is a great opportunity to benefit the entire community,” said Marco resident Bruce Davis. He said it could help businesses, families and real estate sales.

“I hope we give it real serious consideration and a strong look.”

The city is not committed to give up any land, city officials said.

“It’s like a lot of other things. I don’t mind exploring things. It may turn out you can’t put a school over there (at Mackle Park) anyway,” Forcht said.

“I’m not willing to spend any city money on it.”

LIVE BLOG POSTED MONDAY

Proponents of a charter high school on Marco Island, who created a nonprofit organization, Marco Island Discovery Center, proposed beginning their green campus at Mackle Park. City Council unanimously agreed to show their support to explore building the school in the park at their meeting Monday morning.

President of the Discovery Center, Jane Watt, said finding land has been the biggest hurdle.

Vice President Tara Hagan said the school is to be a 9th through 12th grade public charter school.

The goal is to apply for the charter school through the Collier County School District by August 2010 and to open the school by 2011, Watt said.

Hagan said no additional tax dollars are being sought.

Watt said federal grants will be a primary source of funding along with naming rights for the classrooms and portions of the project.

"There is tons of money available through grants," Watt said.

She added that with the environmentally-friendly green design, the organization is seeking three types of grant writers, including for a green facility, community facility and educational facility grants.

Hagan said athletics are to be a portion of the school and that there is a need based on her calculations. She said if 100 percent of all Marco's currently enrolled students at the charter middle school were retained, the school would open with 430 children.

"If 50 percent was retained, we'd open in 2011 with 215 kids, which is average for a charter school around the country," Hagan said.

Watt said most of the planned buildings proposed at Mackle Park will be for shared buildings. The school is being planned close to the lake in the park to not take away green space from the community, she added.

A new multi-purpose room, a cafe located on the water that has wireless internet service and others resources would be shared by the school with the community, proponents said.

Watt said she understood there were issues that needed to be validated, but sought to get council to approve a letter of intent to share the park with the charter high school and green campus proponents, Marco Island Discovery Center.

Vice Chairman Frank Recker said the letter of intent is like saying, "knock yourself out" and doesn't commit the city to anything.

Councilman Ted Forcht questioned the group whether deed restrictions allowed a school at the park.

"The deed restriction was brought to my attention on Saturday," Watt said.

There are restrictions in the deed requiring the land to be used for recreation.

City Council and the county will need to consider whether recreational facilities can be combined with the school per the deed restrictions put on by the original developers, Deltona Corporation.

Councilman Bill Trotter said he supported the letter of intent because the school is not taking away any athletic facilities or green space.

"It's giving a tremendous funding opportunity for us," Trotter said. Adding that the Discovery Center should work with the parks and recreation committee and Parks and Recreation Director Bryan Milk.

"Our goal along has been to be inclusive of everyone," Watt said.

Chairman Rob Popoff opened the topic up to the public.

Councilman Jerry Gibson said the idea may help the city fund the park's master plan.

Terri DiSciullo, president of the Marco Island Parks and Recreation Foundation, said the concept should focus on whether the school works with the park in terms of land use as opposed to whether or not to have a high school.

DiSciullo said the Mackle Brothers of Deltona Corporation set aside an adequate amount of recreational space. She added that it should not be limited.

DiSciullo was concerned about parking space and traffic. "How would students be picked up and dropped off at Mackle (Park) without disrupting park users?" DiSciullo asked.

"What outside facilities will the school need for the physical education of the students?" She said she was concerned it could take away from public use.

School safety requirements was another concern.

"I don't have an objection to the letter of intent of the city working with the school... we have a lack of green space as it is," DiSciullo said.

"Most people who live in-land don't even have a view of the water." She was concerned about anything that might reduce public use at the park, but was not opposed to the idea entirely.

"This is a great opportunity to benefit the entire community," said Marco resident Bruce Davis. He said it could help businesses, families and real estate sales.

"I hope we give it real serious consideration and a strong look."

Marco resident Monte Lazarus, a member of the Mackle Park master plan committee, said the school would not infringe on space at the park. "This is a unique opportunity to do something that has not been done in Collier County or in many places in the State of Florida. This is a very interesting institution that has been proposed."

Ecologically, environmentally and educationally the project is worthwhile, he added.

"The land use is absolutely consistent with the planning of Mackle Park in my opinion."

A few months ago we had a lot of discussion about whether to have a dog park at Mackle Park and now people think it is great, said Marco resident and dog park fundraising leader Jan Temkiewicz. She added that with the library and museum very close, it seems like a great location.

Council unanimously supported a letter of intent to co-locate the public charter school at the park.

Attorney Alan Gabriel, of the firm Weiss-Serota law firm, which represents the city, said the letter would be written in such a way to not commit the city to give up any land, but would show their support.

"It's like a lot of other things. I don't mind exploring things. It may turn out you can't put a school over there (at Mackle Park) anyway," Forcht said.

"I'm not willing to spend any city money on it," he added.

After the meeting DiSciullo said the Marco Island Parks and Recreation Foundation would still be able to raise money for a community center and other elements of the park facilities. She said there may be some sharing of facilities with the school, but the community center would remain with the park.

© 2009 marconews.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Comments » 33

getreal239 writes:

Hey folks, how about we give away our park so these people can micro-manage their kids?

Do not listen when they say they will get that number of students. They won't!

Mackle Park is for everyone, not a few high school students.

The survey that was done months ago showed that the majority of Marco Islanders were not in favor of a new school being built. That has not changed.

u2cane writes:

Ok, you want to include everyone then let's vote on this so we can finally put this dead horse to rest.

Ned269 writes:

How many parks do we need? You already closed a major thoroughfare for a park. We needed a Charter Middle School we got it, Now we need a Charter High School.

suesea writes:

I am shocked that the City Council is supporting this idea. How can anyone say there will be no loss of green space, when it is very easy to see on the plan that there are numerous additional buildings. If this goes through, Mackle Park will very soon become school grounds rather than a public park - with maybe some evening classes for the general public, such as they have at Barron Collier High School in Naples.

Marco-ites - make your voices heard and save our Park. This proposal was not advertised ahead of time. Most people are not even aware of it. Let's make sure that everyone we know is informed.

marcochoosehs writes:

The last time I checked, America is a democracy and competition is a great thing! However, some Marco Islanders fail to see the benefit to enriching the younger generation, and providing choices for education! A message to the Lely parents: beome solution oriented; increase parental participation; and improve academic outcomes. You platform diversity, yet you are biased when families opt to choose a different educational path! Prioritize the needs of your students. Bravo to Ms. Watt and the City of Marco Parks Department for being proactive with the future of our younger generation. We will support your efforts.

lely09 writes:

As my username suggests, I am against a high school on Marco. These people have no idea how sheltered their kids will be. High school is supposed to be a time of growing and learning. These kids are not going to be able to grow into adults if you shelter them from everything off the island. Saying it’s dangerous for them to be driving to and from Lely, and that it takes 3 hours? How fast are they going when they timed that!? I wish they didn’t have this meeting at 9am on a Monday so I had a chance to put my two cents in, as a comment on a Marco news paper website makes no difference. The education is at Lely if students want it. Yes, some Marco kids "fall through the cracks" but i think a little more responsibility falls on the parents for that one. Where are these people getting the idea what their kids won’t thrive in Lely’s environment? What kind of environment is that? I wish they had a website or some way I could contact them to further discuss this issue (if any of you read this, post something)

freedomofspeech1 writes:

This will fail. The first thing that needs to be done is ASK the eligible students if they would go to this school in lieu of any other options.
After being truthful about what the school will offer, you will find that very few parents will want to waste their childs high school years at such a shallow school.
Does anyone know that we currently have a high school option here on Marco? Yes, the First Baptist Church has a High School here...how many are jumping on that wagon which is virtually VIRTUAL!
This Marco High School will not be able to offer the curriculum that a public school can.
They wont be able to offer several foreign language options, various academies and anything that closely resembles a Band. Forget about athletics, that will be a JOKE.
Look I dont want to keep hearing that school is about learning and not all the other "stuff", because IT IS! Kids make memories by being a part of the entire experince. What will be their memories??? Looking at Mackle Lake?
Mark my words...these dumb people will force this down our throats, NO ONE will attend and it will be a FINANCIAL DISASTER!

freedomofspeech1 writes:

I just finished watching the city council meeting at the city website. Terri DiSciullo once again is 100 percent on point! She essentially stated that the issue before us should not focus on whether we are in support of a High School on Marco Island, but rather on the requested location of the school. To agree or disagree as to whether we NEED this school is not the issue and should have no bearing on council's support. The issue is CLEAR...Land Use. This land is for the public recreational use and should be preserved 100 percent for that purpose. Any infringement upon that detracts from the intended use. The organizers for the school claim it takes no green space away but rather compliments the area. Terri points out that while it does not take away it substitutes public use for school use. The Mackle Park master plan was to increase recreational use for all islanders. The school will substitute those plans with their needs. Space used for classrooms and cafe's will take away from our ability to offer a first rate Community Center. The school will eventually monopolize the parking and fields, thereby minimizing the public's access and use when they want it. Lets face it, once the school is there it will never be a park. It will be a school and they will have priority over its use and the public will be waiting in line. With Marco having such limited green space we cannot afford to minimize the general puclics access even minimally.
I applaud Terri for pointing out these key issues. Everyone should go to the city website and view the 11/9/09 City Council meeting and see for themselves.

Since82 writes:

Leave the parks alone.........Stop the contruction of anything........give us a break. If you have nothing better to do than to figure out ways to spend more money and construct new things, at least go fight for the property that was intended to be used for a school.

marcoislander writes:

this is the peoples land NOT the councilmen LET THIS BE KNOWN

u2cane writes:

Ned, why do we NEED a Charter High School? NEED and WANT are two different things. We don't NEED a charter high school, a few people WANT a charter high school because they are afraid of the diversity at Lely. All a charter high will do is shelter some kids that have parents that have sheltered them their whole lives. High school is a life experience, not a shelter.

Fossil writes:

If not for a school to teach our own, what may I ask can be a more important use for public land? A school with a strong academic focus is the greatest gift we can give to our children and our commuity.

Ned269 writes:

in response to u2cane:

Ned, why do we NEED a Charter High School? NEED and WANT are two different things. We don't NEED a charter high school, a few people WANT a charter high school because they are afraid of the diversity at Lely. All a charter high will do is shelter some kids that have parents that have sheltered them their whole lives. High school is a life experience, not a shelter.

I really don't know where all of you get this opinion that that those of us that state we need, or want, or whatever a Charter High School are afraid of diversity, and I never mentioned Lely at all. Those of you that oppose the need for a Charter High School always think we are attacking Lely.
I don't see any of the kids at Marco Island Charter Middle School being sheltered and there seems to be children of all races there if that's what you're referring to as diversity.
Also, there are children that go to the Charter Middle School from all over Collier County. Why do you think parents are bringing their children all the way to Marco? Because they're afraid of diversity? Come On ! Lose that poor excuse.
We want and need good education for our children and beleive this school can give it to our children.
Also, the excuse of a Charter not having extra curricular activity, another B.S. excuse. drop it already.
Marco Charter has a good sports program, what makes you think a Charter High School would not?

freedomofspeech1 writes:

Marco Charter has a good sports program for a MIDDLE school....they play sisters of the mary schools like FBA,NCA,COMMUNITY,SEACREST...If you want your athlete to compete against that for 4 more years be my guest. That is not REAL HS sports. That is the highest level this school will ever offer.

islandgma writes:

Mackle Park should remain a park - we already gave some to the dogs, now to those who want to shelter their children? Yes, I believe that is the issue. How about putting it out in Key Marco? If it is truly going to be a "Discovery" school, there is plenty to discover out there. This is an issue that should be voted on by all folks who pay taxes. Those of you new to Marco know what the island was all about, do not make it into the cities you were fast to leave.

u2cane writes:

Ned, the problem is that many people use the excuse that Lely is a C school. Lely is a very good school and the teachers that are there are excellent, so why do we need another school? Just because Lely is a C school, like Naples high is? Again, I don't see this as a NEED and you have given me nothing to show why this is a NEED instead of a WANT. Lely is more than capable of educating our kids (Ned, how many kids do you have that will be attending high school in the future?) and in fact sending kids to colleges such as Duke and Ivy league institutions. There is one kid I know of right now graduating from Lely this year going to the Ivy leagues. So that is a poor excuse that the people for this charter school use. Again, no NEED for this school, simply a WANT. Diversity, yes, look me straight in the face and tell me that the parents that are pushing for this school aren't concerned about the diversity that Lely offers.

Smeg writes:

Alinsky Vocational High School
Fill the pond to create 15+ additional acres. If water is necessary a large pond of gulf water is only a few yards to the west.
Mackel has the advantage of pre-existing day care areas for the children of the unwed.
Saul and Dale will be proud to have this school named in their honor.
Move on this project rapidly.

condoseller writes:

There is only one question to answer. Should we give up park land to build a high school?

I answer absolutely not.

This should be a campaign issue. Who of the council candidates supports giving up park land to build a high school?

We are not asking about supporting a letter of intent or, about supporting the concept of a high school on the island, the question is simple council candidates, when it comes down to counting your vote, will you vote for or against giving up park land to build a high school?

Whoever states they will vote against giving up our precious park land has my vote.

Ask the question MI Eagle and candidate forum coordinators.

Ned269 writes:

U2cane:
What makes you think I'm white?
Be glad to look you in the eye and tell you.

getreal239 writes:

Don't give our park away to any group!!!!

SAVE OUR PARK! SAVE OUR PARK! SAVE OUR PARK! We the people are committed to saving Mackle Park from being taken over! How can our elected officials even consider something like this? They give up our park, they will be voted out. Guaranteed!

lauralbi1 writes:

The Deed Restrictions actually prohibit this from happening. The problem is that the President of MICA is a big proponent of this Charter School and has two kids that he wants to go to this future school. Let's see if MICA does their job and really stands up to what the Mackle Brothers wanted for Mackle Park. It may actually take a citizen to file a lawsuit, if MICA does not do their job, to enforce the restrictions in the long run. There is no "gray area". A School is not a Park or a recreational use, no matter what you do with the buildings after school or on weekends.
I support a Charter High School on Marco, I do not support using a Public Park to do it.
Ed Issler

freedomofspeech1 writes:

Well said Ed, lets keep this issue clear....its not about Lely, or a High School on Marco...its about LAND USE....this is our park and we only have 2 on the island....Winterberry and Mackle...once you allow the land to be used as a school it will NEVER be a Public park. The people of Marco will be second class citizens in their own park. City council needs to separate their emotions here and treat this as it should be.
How dare this group even ASK for the land to be used as a school.

marco97 writes:

I am at the school every day to pick up my child and have only met a handful of parents but the ones I have are a very diverse group consisting of people from, Brazil, Columbia, Guatemala, Argentina, Mexico, Germany, France, Israel and England. I don't know what the school was like 10 years ago but from what I see it's like the United Nations.

suesea writes:

I walked round Mackle Park today, and REALLY looked at where the proposed school will be. How can anyone say it will not impact the green space. There are going to be buildings where there are presently no buildings, just grass and trees that will be GONE.

And as for sharing the facilities, presumably (and rightly) the school will not want members of the public (who may be sexual predators) wandering around the school during school hours. So we may share the facilities when there are no children around!!!! Maybe 8 p.m. to close, and maybe part of the weekend. I don't think so. This land is designated for PUBLIC use - it must remain the beautiful, serene place that it is for the public.

They will need extended car parking - after all won't all the seniors at least be driving their own cars. And off-island children will be bussed in presumably.

Ms. Watts says "there is tons of money available through grants". Am I the only person who finds this remark insensitive and offensive in these hard financial times. If there is tons of money, it should be directed at those poor people who have found themselves homeless and jobless through no fault of their own. How about financing some Habitat for Humanity homes? Or what about directing it at the current schools, to make improvements so that the level of education there is upgraded.

I spoke to many people since Sunday, when the news was first broken. People who keep themselves abreast of what is going on on our Island - nobody had any inkling that this was going before the Council first thing Monday morning. Not any time at all to change commitments, to be able to attend and voice our concerns. How strange this is!

We must have an Island wide vote on this - it is too important, and has been sprung into being too quickly. We need a Referendum. And we need everybody to be aware of what is happening.

condoseller writes:

MICA should not have to be involved. The City should have done their job and ended this discussion on Monday by enforcing the deed restriction. Instead, City Council agreed to sign a letter of intent which gives further incentive for this group to spend more money on developing plans for a school at Mackle Park. Had the City fullfilled their obligation to protect common land then MICA would have no need to be involved. Let's hope MICA speaks up as they did when the school board wanted to sell Tract K.

Council candidates, where do you stand on this issue?

Ned269 writes:

in response to marco97:

I am at the school every day to pick up my child and have only met a handful of parents but the ones I have are a very diverse group consisting of people from, Brazil, Columbia, Guatemala, Argentina, Mexico, Germany, France, Israel and England. I don't know what the school was like 10 years ago but from what I see it's like the United Nations.

Oh, My Lord, Diversity on our Island! You have to be kidding! We are a "sheltered community" LOL

MrBreeze writes:

Condoseller, you are right on target. MICA needs to stand firm on the deed restriction. I see this group with this letter of intent in hand will then move to the next step of legal action and seek damages for costs of design of the project. The city did not do its job to the citizens of Marco Island in letting this continue. I see it heading for the courthouse to enforce the letter of intent.

ilikemarco writes:

Keep the park a park. There is no place for parking if a school is built there. Use of the path around the lake is already restricted by dogs walking on long leashes. Honor the deed restrictions--school is not recreation. Enough is enough.

liberator100 writes:

City Council made a very bad decision which will come back to haunt them! City cannot give away parts of a public park without first having a city-wide referendum on the issue; regardless of the reason. What if the members of the local Taliban show up and ask for a piece of the park for a madrassa! Will the City be as accommodating to the Taliban as they have been to these elitists?

marco97 writes:

liberator100, ya right you get to vote on this just like you got to vote on the STRP.

ilikemarco writes:

in response to liberator100:

City Council made a very bad decision which will come back to haunt them! City cannot give away parts of a public park without first having a city-wide referendum on the issue; regardless of the reason. What if the members of the local Taliban show up and ask for a piece of the park for a madrassa! Will the City be as accommodating to the Taliban as they have been to these elitists?

Your are right. This school group will take the council vote and try to make it an endorsement and agreement to use park land and a support of the project. The media is already reporting the vote as a "boost" for the school. Let's not let this be a run away train.

lauralbi1 writes:

For right now, this issue is null and void. Please read the letter I just e-mailed, together with the recorded Deed Restrictions, to Council, below.

Gentlemen: The foresight and competence of the Mackle Brothers and their staff is beyond reproach. Once again, their vision has been expressed with no possibility for mis-interpretation. Even a simple citizen, such as myself, does not need a lawyer to understand what the original Developers wanted this land to be utilized for.

But all is not lost for the Marco Island Charter High School, that many of us support (personally I support the school, just not in the Park). But first we must all read the enclosed Deed Restrictions that dictate what can and cannot be done within that land referred to as Mackle Park.

As you can all easily see, Paragraph 1, on Page 1, clearly states that said property or any building constructed thereon may ONLY (emphasis added) be used for the following purposes: outdoor playgrounds; playfields and tot lots; service buildings for rest rooms, storage and equipment, when used in conjunction with park activities;........

So, based on these land use restrictions, which are non-negotiable, the Letter Of Intent that the Council approved at the 09 November meeting would appear to be inappropriate and non-enforceable. In my opinion, the Charter School people need to be informed as soon as possible to avoid any committments or applications they might make based on that Letter Of Intent. I would hate to see any costs or time be incurred on their part based on a non-valid Letter Of Intent.

But, as I stated above, there is a possible salvation. As you can see in paragraph 10, on Page 4, the timing for this request happens to be excellent. For 30 years these restrictions are fixed and not changeable. But that 30 year period ends on 10 January 2010. Now without any action, the restrictions continue in force for 10 year periods of time. But with a "vote of a majority of the then owners of the lots and tracts in the subdivision, it is agreed to change said covenants in whole or in part" (emphasis added).

My interpretation is not important as to who this represents. Since the City owns this property, does this mean that we all vote (as we are all owners) on changing the Deed Restrictions ?? That would be my interpretation. Obviously the neighbors to this property must also have their say (vote) on allowing this use for a school, which I believe was the intent of the Mackle Brothers on this option.

But action must be determined quickly. We have an election coming up early next year and the Charter School Committee must have some result so they know what their options are. This issue must be on the Ballot. Giving away a part of a City Park (physically or by use) should be voted upon by the entire City. It would seem that the Mackle Brothers agree and wanted it this way, also.

Respectfully submitted,
Ed Issler

M_Sullivan writes:

The school could be a good idea but not at the expense of losing more of the park. I think even discussing putting it in Mackle Park is just a prime example of Marco politics in action. If it does get to the point of a possibility and you're counting on the deed restrictions to protect Mackle Park, FORGET IT. Unfortunately, the city doesn't feel deed restrictions apply to them and are ignored. Especially at Mackle Park. The now Public Works storage area/building at the Southwest corner of the park (adjacent to the new dog park) has been a blatant violation of deed restrictions since the city acquired the water utilities. No, it is not part of the water plant, never has been but they just want you to think so. All deed restrictions apply to everyone including the city and should not be selectively enforced.

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