Letters to the editor

Readers' views on the news

View from afar, close up

Editor, Daily News:

A letter writer recently said he’s proud to be called a hater of homosexuals “if that is what it takes to stop this tragedy (HIV/AIDS) from happening.”

Perhaps if he spent less time hating and more time educating himself on some basic facts about the virus and disease, he’d be a happier man.

He claims the Centers for Disease Control says male-with-male sex is responsible for 70 percent of HIV/AIDS cases, so newspaper articles should not support such a dangerous “life choice.” The real CDC figure is just over 50 percent, and that’s for 2006, the most recent year studied. Odds are with greater awareness and transmission preventatives today, the figure is lower.

Arguing that only marriage of a man and woman meets his tests of history, common sense and logic, he claims countries that allow greater flexibility cannot survive: “Consider Denmark and Sweden.”

I doubt he has ever been to Sweden. I am writing this from Alingsas, a small town near Gothenburg, where I attended a christening ceremony for a relative’s child. Not only does the country seem to be surviving as it has done for many more centuries than the U.S., but I don’t think any people anywhere consider the welfare of the next generation as much as do the Swedes.

(They actually have laws against striking your children; the rules on carseats and seatbelts are inflexible, etc.)

And that goes for children being raised by a married couple, an unmarried couple, single women, a couple of the same sex, whatever.

— Don Dunn

Naples

Quite wrong, I fear

Editor, Daily News:

I take great offense at Cal Thomas’s Dec. 30 column today. His warnings of “government death panels” is a huge pile of Republican elephant poo!

Anyone who has watched a terminally ill loved one hooked to machinery that keeps that person alive artificially, with multiple tubes emanating from multiple orifices, can testify to the indignity of some end-of-life situations.

Many, if not most, of our citizens, for multiple reasons, don’t deal with end-of-life issues before it is too late. What this directive allows is for physicians to be paid to counsel their patients, if desired, as to the various possibilities of dealing with end-of-life issues.

Do they want to be kept alive artificially, and under what circumstances?

For many citizens this discussion would be the first time they have ever been exposed to the possibility of death with dignity — that they, in fact, have choices. Documents called “The Five Wishes” along with durable medical and financial powers of attorney are available for this purpose.

This is a far leap from what Thomas proposes as government-run death panels where some official determines who lives and who dies.

Only he and Sarah Palin could espouse such fear-mongering.

— Dr. Jeffrey Zaller

Bonita Springs

Bucking the NCAA

Editor, Daily News:

The Dec. 26 sports section printed a column by David Moulton concerning NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) suspension of five Ohio State University football players for some of the 2011 football games.

Moulton very logically explains why this decision by the NCAA lacks common sense and merit, and, in fact, is not logical.

It is good that the Daily News goes on record by publishing this opinion that points out that decisions made concerning sports, covered by the NCAA, must be managed correctly, logically and with the common sense that all citizens can understand.

One would also hope that bias by one or more of the NCAA decision-makers, against a certain school, would never enter into the decision.

— Richard C. McPherson, M.D.

Naples

Time will tell

Editor, Daily News:

Where is all the hype?

Last year at this time we were bombarded with articles and news stories from some of the “best’’ journalists in the world about the end and beginning of a decade.

One story in the Daily News in the first week of 2010 was about twins born on Dec. 31 and Jan. 1 reported them as being born in different decades.

This year there is barely a mention of the end of the first decade of the third millennium.

The first day of the first century of the third millennium was Jan. 1, 2001. The last day of that first decade is Dec. 31, 2010.

The new or second decade of the third millennium starts on Jan. 1, 2011.

My hope for the new year and new decade is that educators will teach their students how to count decades, centuries and millenniums so that journalists of the future can keep their years in order.

— William J. Silvia

Naples

Buried

Editor, Daily News:

A recent article out of Switzerland was buried away on Page 11A of the Daily News.

It stated that three Swiss engineers were suspected of giving nuclear-weapons technology to a rogue network in Pakistan. The discovery was brought about by a probe into an alleged nuclear-material smuggling ring.

I believe that, of the hundreds of thousands of words of that day’s news, there were none more significant to our future than those above.

It’s only a matter of time.

— Vince D’Angelo

Naples

A call to arms — and pens

Editor, Daily News:

Thanks to U.S. Sens. Orin Hatch, R-Utah, and Richard Durbin, D-Ill., we have a big problem festering in Washington that must be handled now.

Illegal young people who were brought into our land by their parents are working to get the DREAM Act passed.

These youths have been here for years and have benefited at quite an expense from our government (educationally, economically and healthwise). Now they are trying to attain citizenship by having the rules changed in their favor.

The route to citizenship is well-defined and should be supported by those of us who have forefathers who toiled to make this a great country. These young people should be made to return to their native land and apply for a visa, the first step on the path to citizenship.

After all, we have given them the education that should allow their country to grant that visa. Or perhaps they would choose to stay there and work to help their people.

Please read this bill and then contact your congresspeople to block this bill. We must not allow the “conditional status” offered by this bill to become the “permanent status.” Congress is not going to act on its own. Our representatives need to be prodded by us. Please help on this.

— Elizabeth M. Jenkins

Naples

Grinch in Michigan

Editor, Daily News:

Actual wording on a sign at a rental car counter in Detroit last week:

“To our customers:

“Due to the holidays and black-out dates, upgrade coupons will not be honored.

“Have a happy holiday season.

“The Management.”

Seriously. I was there and saw it myself.

— Charlie Berry

Naples

They deliver

Editor, Daily News:

The North Bay post office — in the shopping center on the southeast corner of Wiggins Pass Road and U.S. 41 North — is the most efficient, customer-friendly post office I have ever been lucky enough to find.

If there is a line, it moves very smoothly and rapidly, and transactions are done without a hitch.

Those guys are great!

Happy new year!

— Connie Brown

Naples

There he goes again

Editor, Daily News:

Letter-writer Jim Finnegan once again displays his doctrinaire religious bias, as well as some historical misconceptions.

Same-sex relations have occurred throughout history. It has also been shown that sexual orientation, for the most part, is not a choice, nor is it “curable.”

The Vatican is rather hung up on sexual matters, insisting that procreation (adding more disciples) is the only acceptable path. From a humane and realistic point of view, this position is wrong. The church does not have a monopoly on the truth, other than in its own mind and that of its more orthodox followers.

Lesbians and homosexuals are human beings and, as such, even if one personally disdains the lifestyle, all law-abiding citizens deserve respect, courtesy and equal treatment.

It is also interesting that Finnegan notes that children need two parents, yet rails against abortion when many single women make that choice upon realizing they are not in a position to provide the necessities required to properly raise a child.

HIV/AIDS and other sexually-transmitted diseases are indeed a problem, which is a major reason we need clear and objective sex education for young people. Neither alcohol nor drugs have been successfully controlled. To think that sexual orientation can be is folly.

It is regrettable that closed minds laced with antiquated dogma seek to constantly constrain the freedom and moral choices of others.

— Richard J. Gillis, M.D.

Naples

Lump of coal

Editor, Daily News:

This “Nic” Clause is sending a lump of coal to the property owners, residents and drivers of Bayshore Drive.

Take pride in your property. Clean it up of bottles, cans and cluttered yard waste on the sidewalks and swales.

Please don’t throw your garbage out the window. Teach your children not to litter. Isn’t there a littering fine? A sign might be in order.

— Nicole Clause

Naples

Time will tell

Editor, Daily News:

Where is all the hype?

Last year at this time we were bombarded with articles and news stories from some of the “best” journalists in the world about the end and beginning of a decade.

One story in the Daily News in the first week of 2010 was about twins born on Dec. 31 and Jan. 1 and reported them as being born in different decades.

This year there is barely a mention of the end of the first decade of the third millennium.

The first day of the first century of the third millennium was Jan. 1, 2001. The last day of that first decade is today — Dec. 31, 2010.

The new or second decade of the third millennium starts on Saturday — Jan. 1, 2011.

My hope for the new year and new decade is that educators will teach their students how to count decades, centuries and millenniums so that journalists of the future can keep their years in order.

— William J. Silvia

Naples

View from afar, close up

Editor, Daily News:

A letter writer recently said he’s proud to be called a hater of homosexuals “if that is what it takes to stop this tragedy (HIV/AIDS) from happening.”

Perhaps if he spent less time hating and more time educating himself on some basic facts about the virus and the disease, he’d be a happier man.

He claims the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says male-with-male sex is responsible for 70 percent of HIV/AIDS cases, so newspaper articles should not support such a dangerous “life choice.”

The real CDC figure is just over 50 percent, and that’s for 2006, the most recent year studied. Odds are, with greater awareness and transmission preventatives today, the figure is lower.

Arguing that only marriage of a man and woman meets his tests of history, common sense and logic, he claims countries that allow greater flexibility cannot survive: “Consider Denmark and Sweden.”

I doubt he has ever been to Sweden. I am writing this from Alingsas, a small town near Gothenburg, where I attended a christening ceremony for a relative’s child. Not only does the country seem to be surviving as it has done for many more centuries than the U.S., but I don’t think any people anywhere consider the welfare of the next generation as much as do the Swedes. (They actually have laws against striking your children; the rules on car seats and seat belts are inflexible, etc.)

And that goes for children being raised by a married couple, an unmarried couple, single women, a couple of the same sex, whatever.

— Don Dunn

Naples

Bucking the NCAA

Editor, Daily News:

Sunday’s sports section contained a column by David Moulton concerning the NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) suspension of five Ohio State University football players for some of the 2011 football games.

Moulton very logically explains why this decision by the NCAA lacks common sense and merit, and, in fact, is not logical.

It is good that the Daily News goes on record by publishing this opinion that points out that decisions made concerning sports, covered by the NCAA, must be managed correctly, logically and with the common sense that all citizens can understand.

One would also hope that bias by one or more of the NCAA decision-makers, against a certain school, would never enter into the decision.

— Richard C. McPherson, M.D.

Naples

Toga party

Editor, Daily News:

I don’t know which is more disturbing; the cavalier attitude of the Collier County School Board using $100,000 of taxpayers’ money or that the designated money unaccounted for is used for whatever.

Think slush fund.

Personally, I don’t want my tax dollars paying for Rick Scott’s entertainment.

Brent Batten has the right idea — bands wanting to go have fundraisers when they return.

That I would contribute to.

Also, is it true Scott’s multimillion-dollar inauguration starts with a parade led by Scott himself driving a chariot dressed in a toga and wreath?

— Richard Ulrich

Naples

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