VIDEO: Emergency management: BP opens Naples claims office, Marco Island needs more boom

BP opens claims office in Naples

Dozens are already visiting in seek of ...

BP recently opened a claims office in Naples, Collier County Emergency Management’s coordinator Rick Zyvoloski said during a Marco Island City Council meeting Monday.

The BP claims office is located at 4121 U.S. 41 East, which is near Sugden Regional Park in East Naples. Businesses may also make a claim by calling BP, 800-440-0858.

Zyvoloski recommended that all businesses keep detailed records in case they incur any damages from the spill.

Zyvoloski also said a request has been made for more boom to be allocated to Marco Island.

“When we first came into this disaster, there was a strategy to protect the environmentally sensitive inlets and mangroves,” Zyvoloski said.

Though that strategy remains, he said the initial estimate of Marco needing 103,000 total linear feet of boom, including several different varieties, may not be adequate based on recently created maps and information provided by city officials.

After meeting with Marco and Florida Department of Environmental Protection officials, that need was revised to 153,000 feet due to changing coast lines indicating a disappearance of some barrier islands and areas east of Cape Romano, Zyvoloski said.

Councilman Bill Trotter wanted to know whether the boom would be available as quickly as needed. If the 72-hour outlook, obtainable anytime by calling 252-7755, were to change for Marco Island, could that much boom actually be delivered in-time? he asked.

“I was assured that it would be,” Zyvoloski responded. He added that he didn’t think Marco Island and Southwest Florida was in any threat of experiencing more than perhaps tar balls on the beach, which wouldn’t require boom.

Interim-City Manager Jim Riviere was less confident.

“I’m not confident of anything,” Riviere said.

Trotter said even if there is a chain of command between BP, the federal government and the Coast Guard, he believed city officials had a responsibility to obtain the information.

Riviere said the city will be marking the locations were the boom should go if needed, particularly to protect Marco Island’s primary inlets, including one on the northern end of the barrier island and one to the south. This would ensure the Coast Guard’s ability to get the boom to the proper places quickly.

Fire Chief Mike Murphy said officials on city, county and state levels were doing all they could.

“The bottom line is the oil threat to Southwest Florida is low, has been low and it’s still anticipated to be low,” Zyvoloski said.

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Comments » 5

JoeFubietze writes:

“The bottom line is the oil threat to Southwest Florida is low, has been low and it’s still anticipated to be low,”

Yup, that is why BP is opening a claims office in Naples!

Hey, Roger Hall, you can stop your ridiculous crusade for boom material at your wacky, ever-changing prices now. We have at least double the amount you wanted coming our way at a much better cost...FREE.

Note to Ed Issler/laurelb1; Hey, I'm still waiting for my visit from the authorities.

marco97 writes:

Joe, How can you be sure the oil is not coming here? are you clairvoyant?
All we need is a hurricane in the gulf and that oil will be on our beaches.

JoeFubietze writes:

in response to marco97:

Joe, How can you be sure the oil is not coming here? are you clairvoyant?
All we need is a hurricane in the gulf and that oil will be on our beaches.

I cannot recall making any claims where the oil would or would not go. I copied the quote of Zyvoloski that is the end of the article. Matter of fact, marco97, I am sure that you meant to say "All we need is a hurricane in the gulf and that oil COULD POSSIBLY be on our beaches". Because you cannot be sure either. However, I totally agree with what you are attempting to say. Actually, with the amount of oil that the newest reports calculate has already spewed into the gulf I am very surprised that we have not seen the oil yet. I doubt that we would even need a severe weather event for the oil to be on our beaches. I strongly recommend that everyone watch this http://www.cnn.com/2010/US/04/29/inte... which has been posted on CNN. There are 2 key issues that you need to look for on this series of maps. 1) Why doesn't the surface oil area ever increase proportionately in size? Some days its actually smaller. Because...2) Look at June 8th, 50 seconds into the clip. The surface oil suddenly has a second area due west of us. But just for the one day. The most likely reason is that the oil is mostly underwater most of the time.

Anyhow, my real problems are the ridiculous ideas, knee-jerk reactions and cover-ups. Ridiculous ideas would be using only 10 miles of boom to try to save the island. It is like leaving all your doors and windows open then locking your front door. Knee-jerk reactions are the common way of dealing with many issues on Marco Island. And Cover-ups would be telling us that there is a very low likelihood of oil reaching us while you have just established a local office to handle claims.

I believe that all involved realize that the threat to us is not just possible, it is probable.

JoeFubietze writes:

I totally agree Klabautermann. It is why I say the things that I say. It is not avoidable. When this finally comes at us, there will be very little the boom material will be able to do. The thing that I hear the most is the increased possibility of oil headed our way due to a severe weather event. These are the same people that want to use boom material. Tell me how effective the boom material will be then.

marco97 writes:

in response to JoeFubietze:

I cannot recall making any claims where the oil would or would not go. I copied the quote of Zyvoloski that is the end of the article. Matter of fact, marco97, I am sure that you meant to say "All we need is a hurricane in the gulf and that oil COULD POSSIBLY be on our beaches". Because you cannot be sure either. However, I totally agree with what you are attempting to say. Actually, with the amount of oil that the newest reports calculate has already spewed into the gulf I am very surprised that we have not seen the oil yet. I doubt that we would even need a severe weather event for the oil to be on our beaches. I strongly recommend that everyone watch this http://www.cnn.com/2010/US/04/29/inte... which has been posted on CNN. There are 2 key issues that you need to look for on this series of maps. 1) Why doesn't the surface oil area ever increase proportionately in size? Some days its actually smaller. Because...2) Look at June 8th, 50 seconds into the clip. The surface oil suddenly has a second area due west of us. But just for the one day. The most likely reason is that the oil is mostly underwater most of the time.

Anyhow, my real problems are the ridiculous ideas, knee-jerk reactions and cover-ups. Ridiculous ideas would be using only 10 miles of boom to try to save the island. It is like leaving all your doors and windows open then locking your front door. Knee-jerk reactions are the common way of dealing with many issues on Marco Island. And Cover-ups would be telling us that there is a very low likelihood of oil reaching us while you have just established a local office to handle claims.

I believe that all involved realize that the threat to us is not just possible, it is probable.

I stand corrected Joe, could possibly be on our beaches. But one way or another I think we are going to get some.

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