Our World: ‘It’s fun to be able to act out something that isn’t you’

Ten-year-old Lucie Fumagalli depicts Pepperment Patty in St. Ann School's production of You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown. David Albers/Staff

Photo by DAVID ALBERS // Buy this photo

Ten-year-old Lucie Fumagalli depicts Pepperment Patty in St. Ann School's production of You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown. David Albers/Staff

Lucie Fumagalli does her own freckles.

Last Friday, the 10-year-old fifth-grader stepped out of her own skin and into the role of Peppermint Patty in St. Ann Catholic School’s production of the classic “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown.”

“I’ve got a lot of energy. It’s an important quality of Peppermint Patty. She just doesn’t give up, so it’s a fun part to play,” said Lucie.

In a cast of seven actors accompanied by six chorus members, Lucie acted and sung her role in the musical based on Charles Schulz’s “Peanuts” comic strip. St. Ann’s rendition of the play includes Peppermint Patty adapted from a lesser-know character in the original script.

As Charlie Brown (played by eighth-grader Joey Byre) frets his existence among the Peanuts universe, Lucie is juxtaposed as the supremely confident and gregarious Patty.

It’s a natural role for her.

Lucie admits her likeness to her character, but is quick to point out major differences.

“She’s a spunky, really cool, laid back girl, but she’s tomboyish,” said Lucie. “So, it is fun to play something that is the opposite of me. I do play sports, but I like going to the mall and shopping. I’m not as much of a tomboy. I wear pink.”

Lucie’s spunkiness overshadows the 5-foot tall cutouts of the Peanuts characters onstage. Working alongside her best friend, Gloria Idzi, as Linus, the two girls feed off each other’s buoyant energy.

Their Peanuts roles were written more than 40 years ago. The characters and coming-of-age lessons still hold their truth today.

“It lets you try out different personalities,” Lucie explains. “Right now, I feel like going home and eating ice cream. Right now, she’d feel like throwing a baseball with someone. It’s fun to be able to act out something that isn’t you.

“It lets you change your mood.”

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Connect with David Albers at www.naplesnews.com/staff/david-albers.

© 2011 marconews.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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