Jeb Bush quiets presidential run talk but says country needs fixing

A bespectacled Jeb Bush nearly blushed at the admiration he received from a crowd of about 400 people in Marco Island.

“As a former governor, I don’t get many standing ovations, so this is neat,” he said.

Bush, who was the featured speaker at the inaugural Marco Town Hall Speaker Series event held at the Marco Island Marriot, addressed federal policies and agenda in his 45-minute speech, but later dispelled rumors of a presidential run in two years.

“It’s very flattering that people would consider me worthy of that pursuit,” he said.

He said he has even avoided speaking in Iowa – even though he’s been invited repeatedly – because it’s an early primary state.

“I don’t want to raise speculation,” he said.

Though Bush has been coy about possible presidential plans beyond 2012, he was more transparent about his views about America’s politics and its future.

“The world (doesn’t view) the United States as the gold standard anymore,” Bush said. “That troubles me.”

Bush believes the federal government should prioritize energy, education, and immigration reform while reducing regulation that’s he said prevent innovation.

But he said agencies with “alphabet soup” acronyms create burdens for entrepreneurs, so they go to other countries.

“As people … try to envision a return on their investment all of this rewriting of policy and the uncertainty brings creates new problems,” he said. “That doubt and uncertainty makes it harder to innovate.”

Amending immigration laws and policy may encourage growth, according to Bush. He believes immigration reform should come in two phases. In the first phase, the federal government would focus more resources on border security measures and use methods of internal oversight, such as E-verify.

During the second phase of reform, Bush said lawmakers should amend federal polices to encourage young, aspirational immigrants the opportunity to become permanent citizens.

“We should say (that) we want the aspiring next generation to create prosperity for us,” he said.

According to Bush, the United States needs a diverse and high-achieving “next generation” to “allow the generation that is retiring to live in dignity.”

“It’s not popular, but you do the math,” Bush said. “A declining population of older people will not be able to achieve economic growth.”

Trey Radel, host for a local political radio show, doesn’t think Bush’s immigration policies deviate from the conservative zeitgeist.

“He’s a principled conservative. He can talk about these issues with depth. He comes from a worldly perspective,” Radel said.

To encourage members of the audience to stay involved in the political process, Bush shared a quote from former president Theodore Roosevelt.

“‘Let us run the risk of wearing out instead of rusting out,’” he said. “I’m not a candidate for anything (laugh from people) but I will be in the arena … to change the course of our country.”

The following are quotes from Jeb Bush from Friday night's speech:

On Rick Scott:

“Until Rick Scott showed up, I was probably the most conservative governor in the state’s history.”

“He is incredibly intense, which I like, incredibly hardworking, (and) very disciplined.”

On Hispanic Voters and the Republican Party:

“Be sensitive to the fact that what you say matters,” he said. “They want to feel like they are a part of the team.”

“We can ignore them and expect a state like Nevada to be lost forever, or you can challenge the perception that all Hispanics are liberal because they’re not.”

On the Wisconsin Protest and Governor Scott Walker:

“Maybe he’s a little aggressive, but I was and I like that.”

“I’m a huge Scott Walker fan, and I think he’s on the right side of this.”

“This is tough duty right now to be in public life and (people like) Walker are showing a better way.”

On hearing Marco Rubio stump:

“I cried every time because it just warmed my heart that someone could speak about the aspirational parts of our country in such a moving way.”

“I’m one of the groupies.”

On Education:

“I think the system stinks. We have a system that doesn’t work and we need transformation.”

“We should be able to fire the bad teachers that exist all across the country. They are a minority, but they have a debilitating effect.”

“We have to stop the notion that there is something idyllic about this notion that universal education has to be homogenous across the country.”

On Hope:

“Americans want hope … real hope, not the hopey, changey stuff.”

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Comments » 11

captnjimbo writes:

Note how strong he is on the education problem.

RayPray writes:

in response to islandeye1#236971:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

Kindly remember that Marianne Herzili is a lady!!

Ocram (Inactive) writes:

(This comment was removed by site staff before I posted it! ;-)

u2cane writes:

captnjimbo writes:
Note how strong he is on the education problem.
.

That is because he owns a testing company, so he stands to gain a lot of money if we go to a test based pay schedule for teachers. It is not about education, it is about him making more money (just like it is with just about any politician these days).

naples_rocket writes:

in response to u2cane:

captnjimbo writes:
Note how strong he is on the education problem.
.

That is because he owns a testing company, so he stands to gain a lot of money if we go to a test based pay schedule for teachers. It is not about education, it is about him making more money (just like it is with just about any politician these days).

Are you talking about Pearson?

I have been following this company since I took grad school admission tests. Exorbitant fees for nothing. Call center in India. For example, they administer GMAT. This test is required by most of the legit business schools not only here but worldwide! China, Europe, Singapore, you name it, everybody has to pay $250 and take it. Very often retake it. For an additional $250. I can only imagine the money they are making.
And all those $100-200 textbooks...

Anyway, I wonder how much money Collier C schools board dishes out to this corporation. Teachers keep talking about books, tests and other instructional materials from Pearson. Every time I go to the school board there's always somebody with Pearson badge in the elevator. Very interesting.

captnjimbo writes:

in response to naples_rocket:

Are you talking about Pearson?

I have been following this company since I took grad school admission tests. Exorbitant fees for nothing. Call center in India. For example, they administer GMAT. This test is required by most of the legit business schools not only here but worldwide! China, Europe, Singapore, you name it, everybody has to pay $250 and take it. Very often retake it. For an additional $250. I can only imagine the money they are making.
And all those $100-200 textbooks...

Anyway, I wonder how much money Collier C schools board dishes out to this corporation. Teachers keep talking about books, tests and other instructional materials from Pearson. Every time I go to the school board there's always somebody with Pearson badge in the elevator. Very interesting.

Rocket and Cane...glad you picked up on this.

In the last 6 months I have read both the Romney book and the Gingrich book. Both came on as strong as the Jebster on the need to localize the school systems and push teachers to be as good in their late years as they were in their right out of college years. The Charter school initiative across the country works off the local needs...with strong parental involvement and influence by them and their administrators and without dictates from a union.

I spent most of my life in Wisconsin, in a town that put all of its schools in one "unified" district and frankly it was run by the teachers union. The teachers I knew personally hated it and it drove the brightest kids to private schools. This town, Racine Wisconsin, had a beligerent union leadership, and now on National television everyone can get a look. My daughter taught in a public school in a rural district and while the school was in a district, the administration for each school remained somewhat independent and they were able to turn out a pretty good product yet the state collected the union dues and a few strong minded teacher labor activist made it difficult for the administrators. My daughter subsequently has joined a private academy...in Florida. She makes a little less money and has a one year contract and can be terminated for cause, in a heartbeat. So why does she do it? Diciplined kids and teachers, close monitoring with influence by the admintrators and rewarding results from the kids.

My ploy in my opening was to bring back the argument in favor of a charter school here, which has been proven to be a better educational product than the current labor controlled system in place in most areas of the country. They either succeed by being more effective or the parents will vote with their feet..and seats.

Jeb knows this...the Governor in New Jersey knows it...the Govenor in Wisconsin knows it...as well as everybody else that has seen the system gamed.

Ocram (Inactive) writes:

in response to captnjimbo:

Rocket and Cane...glad you picked up on this.

In the last 6 months I have read both the Romney book and the Gingrich book. Both came on as strong as the Jebster on the need to localize the school systems and push teachers to be as good in their late years as they were in their right out of college years. The Charter school initiative across the country works off the local needs...with strong parental involvement and influence by them and their administrators and without dictates from a union.

I spent most of my life in Wisconsin, in a town that put all of its schools in one "unified" district and frankly it was run by the teachers union. The teachers I knew personally hated it and it drove the brightest kids to private schools. This town, Racine Wisconsin, had a beligerent union leadership, and now on National television everyone can get a look. My daughter taught in a public school in a rural district and while the school was in a district, the administration for each school remained somewhat independent and they were able to turn out a pretty good product yet the state collected the union dues and a few strong minded teacher labor activist made it difficult for the administrators. My daughter subsequently has joined a private academy...in Florida. She makes a little less money and has a one year contract and can be terminated for cause, in a heartbeat. So why does she do it? Diciplined kids and teachers, close monitoring with influence by the admintrators and rewarding results from the kids.

My ploy in my opening was to bring back the argument in favor of a charter school here, which has been proven to be a better educational product than the current labor controlled system in place in most areas of the country. They either succeed by being more effective or the parents will vote with their feet..and seats.

Jeb knows this...the Governor in New Jersey knows it...the Govenor in Wisconsin knows it...as well as everybody else that has seen the system gamed.

Give me a break! Your daughter may be one of a limited number of special people. But for the most part those that join Charter Schools do it because they could not find a better job elsewhere.

Now since you are so much in touch with what the teachers of the Academy are capable of please list the credentials and experience of those hired to date. Enough of the possibilities, please list the facts so parents can honestly see who their children will be educated by.

RayPray writes:

in response to u2cane:

captnjimbo writes:
Note how strong he is on the education problem.
.

That is because he owns a testing company, so he stands to gain a lot of money if we go to a test based pay schedule for teachers. It is not about education, it is about him making more money (just like it is with just about any politician these days).

I can't find any information that Jeb owns a testing company. Which is it?

Pearson is a huge UK based and publicly owned educational publishing company. They publish the Financial Times, for example. They own many esteemed science publishing subsidiaries.

While these texts are expensive, this is no more so than other publishers today.

Pearsoned is involved with GMAT and educational supplies this. They also own PearsonVue which gives tests.

But there prices are in line with other professional certs like those offered by Comptia and Microsoft and Cisco, some of which are given by competitor Prometric.

While these may seem dear, the certs are the vocational equivalents of up to a BS degree in some areas, and the total expense is much cheaper than tuition and books from any college today.

I've taken many Prometric certs at $125-- each. These seemed dear, but was told by someone working for Prometric that the testing centers barely broke even on giving these exams.

In fact, in the last 10 years all the Prometric testing centers in SW FLA have shut down. The nearest remaining Pearson one in in Port Charlotte.

I suspect it is the same for GMAT.

I have small faith in any of these ed reform schemes floated by politicians.

Still how does Jeb control the huge company Pearson???

naples_rocket writes:

in response to RayPray:

I can't find any information that Jeb owns a testing company. Which is it?

Pearson is a huge UK based and publicly owned educational publishing company. They publish the Financial Times, for example. They own many esteemed science publishing subsidiaries.

While these texts are expensive, this is no more so than other publishers today.

Pearsoned is involved with GMAT and educational supplies this. They also own PearsonVue which gives tests.

But there prices are in line with other professional certs like those offered by Comptia and Microsoft and Cisco, some of which are given by competitor Prometric.

While these may seem dear, the certs are the vocational equivalents of up to a BS degree in some areas, and the total expense is much cheaper than tuition and books from any college today.

I've taken many Prometric certs at $125-- each. These seemed dear, but was told by someone working for Prometric that the testing centers barely broke even on giving these exams.

In fact, in the last 10 years all the Prometric testing centers in SW FLA have shut down. The nearest remaining Pearson one in in Port Charlotte.

I suspect it is the same for GMAT.

I have small faith in any of these ed reform schemes floated by politicians.

Still how does Jeb control the huge company Pearson???

I would too like to see some link to verify the info that Jeb B is somehow connected to one of the testing companies...
I mentioned Pearson because I know that it does a lot of curriculum development and other stuff for our school district. Which is an empire by itself with way too many employees yet still manages to get away with hiring consultants for every little thing plus hires companies like Pearson to develop curriculum, etc. I am not saying that their products are bad, but they are just sooooo expensive. And what all these people at school district are doing if we have to hire an outside company do do this kind of job?
All the school district staff+school board members+superintendent+consultants+Pearson and we are talking real numbers.

RayPray writes:

in response to naples_rocket:

I would too like to see some link to verify the info that Jeb B is somehow connected to one of the testing companies...
I mentioned Pearson because I know that it does a lot of curriculum development and other stuff for our school district. Which is an empire by itself with way too many employees yet still manages to get away with hiring consultants for every little thing plus hires companies like Pearson to develop curriculum, etc. I am not saying that their products are bad, but they are just sooooo expensive. And what all these people at school district are doing if we have to hire an outside company do do this kind of job?
All the school district staff+school board members+superintendent+consultants+Pearson and we are talking real numbers.

Pearson is an old and reputable company with huge market cap:

http://finance.yahoo.com/q/pr?s=PSON....

"I am not saying that their products are bad, but they are just sooooo expensive."

My point was that all higher education products are extortionate today.

I know someone at a local college who pays twice in books what I paid in tuition decades ago!

I don't know what the CCPS is doing with Pearson.

However, many of the products & services they offer thru Pearson Vue for tutoring kids and professional certs are quite good and cheaper than the alternatives.

If you had a failing school kid, better to have him tutored by Vue than hiring a private tutor.

Just don't see the Bushes have the $$$ to have any control over Pearson....

WhiskeyTangoFoxtrot writes:

All you people that argue on here are very funny (dumb)!

It's all the same. Be it Jeb, Barry, Clinton, George, Romney, etc. It doesn't matter! Schools suck. Debt rises. Jobs lost. Dollar loses value (purchasing power / inflation). When will you all learn. Real change IS needed! Not Barry's hope for change! Keep waiting! Let me know when it arrives!

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