Germany sees rise in reported E. coli cases

An employee of the consumer protection authority of Lower Saxony examines samples of sprouts from a farm in the Uelzen area in Oldenburg, northern Germany, Monday, June 6, 2011. In a surprising U-turn, German officials said the initial tests provided no evidence that sprouts from an organic farm in northern Germany were the cause of the country's deadly E. coli outbreak. The Lower-Saxony state agriculture ministry said 23 of 40 samples from the sprout farm suspected of being behind the outbreak have tested negative for the highly aggressive, 'super-toxic' strain of E. coli bacteria. It said tests were still under way on the other 17 sprout samples. (AP Photo/dapd, Markus Hibbeler)

An employee of the consumer protection authority of Lower Saxony examines samples of sprouts from a farm in the Uelzen area in Oldenburg, northern Germany, Monday, June 6, 2011. In a surprising U-turn, German officials said the initial tests provided no evidence that sprouts from an organic farm in northern Germany were the cause of the country's deadly E. coli outbreak. The Lower-Saxony state agriculture ministry said 23 of 40 samples from the sprout farm suspected of being behind the outbreak have tested negative for the highly aggressive, "super-toxic" strain of E. coli bacteria. It said tests were still under way on the other 17 sprout samples. (AP Photo/dapd, Markus Hibbeler)

BERLIN (AP) — Germany's national disease control center says the number of people reported sick in a deadly bacterial outbreak is still rising even though German officials say there is hope the epidemic is abating.

The Robert Koch Institute told The Associated Press on Wednesday that another person has died in Germany from the E. coli infection, raising the toll to 24 in Germany, plus one in Sweden. The number of reported cases is up by more than 300 over the previous day to 2,648, including nearly 700 suffering from a serious complication that can cause kidney failure.

Even though the reported cases are going up, there is often a lag in the reporting time and German Health Minister Daniel Bahr says the number of new infections "are clearly going down."

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