Born to dance – Marco Island Charter Middle School student Breana Wielgos

Jean Amodea Special to the Eagle
Ballet student, Breana Wielgos demonstrates a flat foot arabesque, a position in which the dancer stands on one leg, while the other leg is extended behind the body, with both knees straight.

Jean Amodea Special to the Eagle Ballet student, Breana Wielgos demonstrates a flat foot arabesque, a position in which the dancer stands on one leg, while the other leg is extended behind the body, with both knees straight.

Jean Amodea Special to the Eagle
Abdelazis Roque, Artistic Director and owner of the Naples Dance Conservatory gives student Breana Wielgos pointers on form.

Jean Amodea Special to the Eagle Abdelazis Roque, Artistic Director and owner of the Naples Dance Conservatory gives student Breana Wielgos pointers on form.

Jean Amodea Special to the Eagle
Breana Wielgos stretching after an evening lesson at the Naples Dance Conservatory.

Jean Amodea Special to the Eagle Breana Wielgos stretching after an evening lesson at the Naples Dance Conservatory.

Jean Amodea Special to the Eagle
Another view of ballet student, Breana Wielgos demonstrates a flat foot arabesque, a position in which the dancer stands on one leg, while the other leg is extended behind the body, with both knees straight.

Jean Amodea Special to the Eagle Another view of ballet student, Breana Wielgos demonstrates a flat foot arabesque, a position in which the dancer stands on one leg, while the other leg is extended behind the body, with both knees straight.

— Breana Wielgos wants to be a dancer someday and she seems to be destined to realize her dream. Since early on – in fact before she was born – her mother, Kathy said that while carrying her daughter, each time she played music, the unborn child would stir in her womb – dancing, she said.

“Even after Breana was born, the only thing that could soothe her was listening to music. And watch me twirl and dance. Her first words were ‘again’ wanting to hear the song played again and ‘up’ indicating she wanted me to get up and dance for her,” said Kathy.

An early walker at 10 months, Breana loved to watch television and bop to the music. She began dance class at age two and a half and has been taking lessons ever since.

“I started her with a combo class at Island Dance Academy, operated by Natalie Strafford where she still attends and practices all dance forms. I waited for some time before starting her En pointe and ballet lessons, then a year and a half ago, I enrolled at Naples Dance Conservatory,” said Wielgos.

“She is doing great and progressing well,” said owner, Artistic Director and Head Ballet Master Abdelazis Roque, who also teaches the Cuban method of dance.

Now 13 years of age, the young dancer is entering her teen years with her dream intact.

“My head is filled with wonderful dreams, with fears to conquer and smiles to share. My journey might be difficult, but I don’t care,” she penned in a poem sent to her mother.

However, the pursuit of her aspiration to become a dancer has not come without cost.

“Breana is often left out of social activities, because her friends know she is always busy practicing or taking lessons, but she is willing to make that sacrifice. Dance is not a extra-curricular activity, it is her future,” said Kathy.

Not desirous of being pegged as a stage mother, Kathy says she has never pushed her daughter and that it has always been solely her daughter’s decision to devote her time to dance.

“If she wants to achieve her dream, she knows that she has to become the best of the best – it is a completive field. And as single mom, I do my best to make it happen for her – like any devoted mother, I have put my social life on hold and I am doing all I can to help her. If one day she decides she is done with dance, I will back her up and support her in whatever direction she chooses,” she added.

Some of Breana’s more memorable performances were at the age of nine, in 2007 when she danced at the half time show at the Orange Bowl, performing with an on-field dance troupe for on-stage acts, Gladys Knight and Taylor Swift.

“In 2007, 2009 and 2010 she had roles in ‘The Nutcracker’ at the Naples Philharmonic. But more than playing a part, she was most excited about sharing the stage with the Miami City Ballet,” said Kathy.

“I hope that the public will support our youth, especially those who work so hard to excel in the arts and who are so dedicated to their passion. These kids need scholarships and other similar support.”

At present, Breana, who is a student at Marco Island Charter Middle School, spends 15 to 20 hours a week at her craft, between lessons and at home practice in a room that has been fitted with a wooden floor and floor length mirror.

When asked about the role the young ballerina would most like to perform, she responded that of either the white or black swan in Tchaikovsky’s “Swan Lake” ballet.

“The greatest rewards for me are to be able to express myself on stage through dance. I am constantly challenging myself to be the best I can be,” said Breana. “My mom encourages me to never give up – she drives me.”

My Future

A poem by Breana Wielgos

In the future

I hope to be

A magnificent dancer

Or a mother to be

My head is filled with wonderful dreams

With fears to conquer and smiles to share

My journey might be difficult

But I don’t care

I hope one day

That I can be a terrific mother

As my mother has been to me

She truly is like no other

The lessons that she has shared with me

Taught me I could be anything I wanted to be

There is not failure unless you try

It will be interesting to see what my future has

In store for me

© 2011 marconews.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Comments » 1

blondie writes:

Bravo! It is so refreshing to reading such an inspired story full of ambition, hopes, dreams, and positive attitude. With that much ambition and talent, you are well on your way to making your dream come true.

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