Marcophiles: State of the art heart center is up and running

CHRIS CURLE
At the reception desk of the spacious new Naples Heart Institute, Medical Director Dr. Ron Levine talks shop with nurse Tammy Case. Don Farmer/Eagle Correspondent 

The 25,000 square foot facility on the NCH campus accommodates 13 cardiologists and other healthcare professionals

At the reception desk of the spacious new Naples Heart Institute, Medical Director Dr. Ron Levine talks shop with nurse Tammy Case. Don Farmer/Eagle Correspondent The 25,000 square foot facility on the NCH campus accommodates 13 cardiologists and other healthcare professionals

iiPads have replaced old magazines in the waiting room at the new Naples Heart Institute. Don Farmer/Eagle Correspondent

From games to publications to graphics of heart functions, the iPads help patients pass the time and summon them when the doctor is ready.

iiPads have replaced old magazines in the waiting room at the new Naples Heart Institute. Don Farmer/Eagle Correspondent From games to publications to graphics of heart functions, the iPads help patients pass the time and summon them when the doctor is ready.

As I was coming out of the shiny new Naples Heart Institute the other day, after interviewing the facility’s Medical Director, Dr. Ron Levine, a couple also leaving the Institute struck up a conversation.

They are among the many Marco Islanders whose cardiologists are in the group of 13 doctors now headquartered at the 25,000 square foot Institute.

“The Institute is part of the NCH Healthcare Group, which is the group of physicians employed by and under the roof of the NCH Healthcare System,” Dr. Levine explained.” I asked why the Institute was created.

“One very important reason is the commitment to improving quality of care.

“There’s a lot of quality infrastructure out there that many of the private physicians’ offices didn’t invest in because of the expense. So by being together and having integration with the hospital partner, we have more medical resources.

“For example, I can be at my home in the middle of the night and pull up not just a report but actual images of an angiogram that was done at the hospital on one of my patients who came in at 3 a.m. I can review their images and make better decisions about what to do for them.

“What’s more, if I’m on call and must deal with a patient previously unknown to me, I have the information at my fingertips, so it improves patient care, makes it more efficient, much safer and less costly.”

One feature that patients visiting the new Institute will notice immediately is the warmly decorated yet sleek-looking waiting room, a far cry from some waiting rooms we’ve all been in somewhere from time to time.

For one thing, there are no old magazines strewn about. No longer can I enjoy browsing through a 1992 issue of Field and Stream magazine while awaiting an echocardiogram.

The waiting area abounds with iPads loaded with e-versions of current publications, plus games such as Angry Bird. If a patient wants to learn more about his or her medical situation, vivid videos of various heart-related situations are just a click away. The iPad will even alert you when the doctor is ready to see you.

In my Farmer File column in this Friday’s Naples Daily News, I’ll have more on the new Naples Heart Institute and its plans to help medical professionals and patients in this area cope with the healthcare challenges ahead.

Lee Horton, a member of the Artists Colony at the Esplanade, shows a collective work of artists' small paintings about trees. It's similar to the collaborative work the Artists' Colony is doing about Marco's proposed big flag. Don Farmer/Eagle Correspondent

Lee Horton, a member of the Artists Colony at the Esplanade, shows a collective work of artists' small paintings about trees. It's similar to the collaborative work the Artists' Colony is doing about Marco's proposed big flag. Don Farmer/Eagle Correspondent

Artists donate time and talent to the Big Flag campaign

It was a welcome call the other day when artist Jo-Ann Sanborn phoned with good news from the Artists Colony at the Esplanade.

“We have voted to create a collaborative work of art and donate it to the flag project,” Jo-Ann said.

Here’s the deal. Artists at the Colony will get creative (as they do all the time, of course) and each contribute a small painting, impressionist perhaps, retro maybe or whatever they want to create, about the plan to put up a big American flag near the Jolley Bridge entrance to the island. The emphasis is on total, no-rules creativity.

Jo-Ann and her colleagues will put the paintings together in one frame and give it to the flag committee, which can use it to raise money for the Big Flag Campaign.

No decisions have been made yet on how best to incorporate the artists’ creation into the fund-raising campaign, but one possibility would be a raffle. Stay tuned.

Chris Curle is a former news anchor for CNN and for ABC-TV stations in Washington, D.C., Atlanta and Houston. E-mail chris@chriscurle.com.

Don is a former ABC News correspondent and bureau chief and a former news anchor for CNN and ABC-TV, in Atlanta. His Farmer File column appears Fridays in the Naples Daily News. E-mail: don@donfarmer.com.

© 2011 marconews.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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