Romney-Ryan 2012: That's the ticket

Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, right, and vice presidential candidate Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., wave at the crowd during a campaign event, Saturday, Aug. 11, 2012, in Norfolk, Va. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, right, and vice presidential candidate Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., wave at the crowd during a campaign event, Saturday, Aug. 11, 2012, in Norfolk, Va. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

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NewsMakers: Paul Ryan

He endorses Chauncey Goss.

NORFOLK, Va. — Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney introduced Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin as his vice presidential running mate on Saturday, turning to the architect of a deeply conservative and intensely controversial long-term budget plan to remake Medicare and cut trillions in federal spending.

In the campaign to come, Republicans will present economic solutions "that are bold, specific and achievable," Romney said as he presented his political partner. "We offer our commitment to create 12 million new jobs and bring better take home pay to middle class families."

The two men basked in the cheers of supporters in their made-for-television debut on a ticket hoping to make President Barack Obama's first term his last. "I did not make a mistake with this guy," Romney exulted.

"I am deeply excited and honored to join you as your running mate," Ryan said in his first words at the podium." He said that together, Republicans would eliminate the country's "debt, doubt and despair."

He said that "Regrettably, President Obama has become part of the problem, and Mitt Romney is the solution" to an economy that has yet to make a strong recovery from the worst recession in decades.

The ticket made its debut at a naval museum in Norfolk, Va., the initial stop of a bus tour through four battleground states, including Florida, in as many days. The USS Wisconsin, berthed at the museum, was their bunting-draped backdrop, a symbol of the nation's military strength as well as an obvious reference to Ryan's home state.

First Romney, then Ryan, a generation younger than his patron, jogged down the ship's gangplank to the cheers of hundreds and the stirring soundtrack from the movie "Air Force One."

As his family came on stage, Ryan knelt to embrace his daughter and two sons before kissing his wife.

While word of Ryan's selection leaked late Friday night and was posted by the campaign to its phone app before the speeches, Obama's campaign withheld its reaction until the Republicans had spoken.

"The architect of the radical Republican House budget, Ryan, like Romney, proposed an additional $250,000 tax cut for millionaires, and deep cuts in education from Head Start to college aid," Jim Messina, the president's campaign manager, said in a written statement.

"His plan would also end Medicare as we know it by turning it into a voucher system, shifting thousands of dollars in health care costs to seniors," he said.

Ryan's selection — as well as Romney's own nomination — will be ratified by delegates to the Republican National Convention that begins Aug. 27 in Tampa.

Obama and Vice President Joseph Biden will be nominated for a second term at the Democratic convention the following week.

One campaign official said Romney settled on Ryan on Aug. 1, more than a week ago, and informed Beth Myers, the longtime aide who had shepherded the secretive process that led to the selection. The official spoke on condition of anonymity to provide details.

It was not known when Romney informed Ryan he wanted him on the ticket.

In making his pick, Romney bypassed other potential running mates, including Ohio Sen. Rob Portman, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty and Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell.

Officials said he had called all four to notify them of his decision.

There was one unscripted moment, when Romney mistakenly introduced Ryan as the next president. He returned to the podium to say, "Every now and then I'm known to make a mistake. I didn't make a mistake with this guy. But I can tell you this, he is going to be the next vice president of the United States."

At 42, Ryan is a more than two decades younger than the 65-year-old Romney.

His conservative credentials are highly regarded by fellow Republican House members, while numerous polls during the primaries of winter and spring found that Romney's credentials were suspect among the party's core supporters.

A seven-term congressman, Ryan is chairman of the House Budget Committee, and primary author of conservative tax and spending blueprints that the tea party-infused Republican majority approved over vociferous Democratic opposition in 2011 and again in 2012.

They envision transforming Medicare into a program in which future seniors would receive government checks that they could use to purchase health insurance. Under the current program, the government directly pays doctors, hospitals and other health care providers.

Ryan and other supporters say the change is needed to prevent the program from financial calamity. Critics argue it would impose ever-increasing costs on seniors.

Other elements of the budget plan would cut projected spending for Medicaid, which provides health care for the poor, as well as food stamps, student loans and other social programs that Obama and Democrats have pledged to defend.

In all, it projected spending cuts of $5.3 trillion over a decade, and cut future projected deficits substantially.

It also envisions a far reaching overhaul of the tax code of the sort Romney has promised.

Romney and Ryan appeared unusually comfortable with each other when they campaigned together earlier in the year. The former governor eagerly shared the microphone with the younger man and they shared hamburgers at a fast food restaurant.

In making an endorsement before his state's primary last spring, Ryan said, "I picked who I think is going to be the next president of the United States — I picked Mitt Romney. ... The moment is here. The country can be saved. It is not too late to get America back on the right track. ... It is not too late to save the American idea."

Romney was the subject of an April Fools prank in which Ryan played a role. Romney showed up at a supposed campaign event where he heard Ryan calling him "the next president of the United States" — only to find the room nearly empty.

In recent days, conservative pundits have been urging Romney to choose Ryan in large part because of his authorship of a House-backed budget plan that seeks to curb overall spending on benefit programs such as Medicare, Medicaid and food stamps.

Republican National Committee finance chairman Ron Weiser of Michigan, said Friday night that Ryan's selection would help Romney win Wisconsin and its 10 electoral votes in the fall. The state typically supports Democrats in presidential contests, and Obama won it handily four years ago.

Ryan has worked in Washington for much of his adult life, a contrast to Romney, who frequently emphasizes his experience in business.

The congressman worked as an aide in Congress, and also was a speechwriter for Jack Kemp, who years earlier had been one of the driving forces behind across-the-board tax cuts that were at the heart of Ronald Reagan's winning presidential campaign in 1980.

Ryan is also well-known for his fiendish physical fitness workouts.

His congressional district in southeast Wisconsin has something of a bipartisan voting record. Obama took 54 percent of the vote there in 2008, while the congressman received 64 percent in winning re-election.

Outside Ryan's home in Janesville, Wis., on Friday night, there was nothing to suggest that the residence belonged to a vice presidential candidate. An Associated Press reporter who knocked just before midnight got no answer. There was a light on in a first-floor room of the two-story brick home atop a hill.

Earlier this week, a Ryan adviser said the congressman, his wife and their three children were preparing for a weeklong Colorado vacation.

Most of Romney's staff learned of the planned announcement during a 10 p.m. EDT conference call Friday about an hour before the campaign issued a statement. The identity of Romney's pick was not disclosed during the call. The campaign had promised that first news of the selection would be delivered via a phone app.

Earlier in the day, Romney's campaign briefed reporters on the bus tour without mention of the impending vice presidential announcement.

The tour will take Romney through Virginia, North Carolina, Florida and Ohio. All are battlegrounds where Obama won in 2008. They hold a combined 75 electoral votes, of the 270 needed to win election.

Posted earlier:

AP: Romney picks Rep. Paul Ryan of Wis. for VP running mate

NORFOLK, Va. — Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney intends to name Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin as his vice presidential running mate for the fall campaign, party officials said early Saturday, turning to the architect of a conservative and intensely controversial long-term budget plan to remake Medicare and cut trillions in federal spending.

These officials said a formal announcement was set for Norfolk, Va., as the newly minted Republican ticket begins a bus tour through four battleground states, including Florida, in as many days. They spoke on condition of anonymity, saying they were not authorized to disclose the decision.

In a statement issued Friday night, Romney's campaign said only that the running mate would be present at 9 a.m. EDT at the Nauticus Museum. The USS Wisconsin is berthed there — offering a hint about Ryan's selection.

Ryan's selection — as well as Romney's own nomination — will be ratified by delegates to the Republican National Convention that begins on Aug. 27 in Tampa.

President Barack Obama and Vice President Joseph Biden will be nominated for a second term at the Democratic convention the following week.

At 42, Ryan is a generation younger than the 65-year-old Romney.

His conservative credentials are highly regarded by fellow Republican House members, while numerous polls found that Romney's own were suspect among the party's core supporters during the primaries of winter and spring.

A seventh-term congressman, Ryan is chairman of the House Budget Committee, and primary author of conservative tax and spending blueprints that the tea party-infused Republican majority approved over vociferous Democratic opposition in 2011 and again in 2012.

It envisions transforming Medicare into a program in which future seniors would receive government checks that they could use to purchase health insurance. Under the current program, the government directly pays doctors, hospitals and other health care providers.

Ryan and other supporters say the change is needed to prevent the program from financial calamity. Critics argue it would impose ever-increasing costs on seniors.

Other elements of the budget plan would cut projected spending for Medicaid, which provides health care for the poor, as well as food stamps, student loans and other social programs that Obama and Democrats have pledged to defend.

In all, it projected spending cuts of $5.3 trillion over a decade, and cut future projected deficits substantially.

It also envisions a far reaching overhaul of the tax code of the sort Romney has promised.

In turning to Ryan, Romney bypassed other potential running mates without the Wisconsin lawmaker's following among rank-and-file conservatives, including Ohio Sen. Rob Portman and former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty.

Republican officials said Romney had spoken with both men.

Romney and Ryan appeared unusually comfortable with each other when they campaigned together earlier in the year. The former governor eagerly shared the microphone with the younger man and they shared hamburgers at a fast food restaurant.

In making an endorsement before his state's primary last spring, Ryan said, "I picked who I think is going to be the next president of the United States — I picked Mitt Romney. ... The moment is here. The country can be saved. It is not too late to get America back on the right track. ... It is not too late to save the American idea."

Romney was the subject of an April Fools prank in which Ryan played a role. Romney showed up at a supposed campaign event where he heard Ryan calling him "the next president of the United States" — only to find the room nearly empty.

In recent days, conservative pundits have been urging Romney to choose Ryan in large part because of his authorship of a House-backed budget plan that seeks to curb overall spending on benefit programs such as Medicare, Medicaid and food stamps.

Republican National Committee finance chairman Ron Weiser of Michigan, said Friday night that Ryan's selection would help Romney win Wisconsin and its 10 electoral votes in the fall. The state typically supports Democrats in presidential contests, and Obama won it handily four years ago.

Ryan has worked in Washington for much of his adult life, a contrast to Romney, who frequently emphasizes his experience in business.

The congressman worked as an aide in Congress, and also was a speechwriter for Jack Kemp, who years earlier had been one of the driving forces behind across-the-board tax cuts that were at the heart of Ronald Reagan's winning presidential campaign in 1980.

Ryan is also well-known for his fiendish physical fitness workouts.

His congressional district in southeast Wisconsin has something of a bipartisan voting record. Obama took 54 percent of the vote there in 2008, while the congressman received 64 percent in winning re-election.

Outside Ryan's home in Janesville, Wis., on Friday night, there was nothing to suggest that the residence belonged to a vice presidential candidate. An Associated Press reporter who knocked just before midnight got no answer. There was a light on in a first-floor room of the two-story brick home atop a hill.

Earlier this week, a Ryan adviser said the congressman, his wife and their three children were preparing for a weeklong Colorado vacation.

Most of Romney's staff learned of the planned announcement during a 10 p.m. EDT conference call Friday about an hour before the campaign issued a statement. The identity of Romney's pick was not disclosed during the call. The campaign had promised that first news of the selection would be delivered via a phone app.

Earlier in the day, Romney's campaign briefed reporters on the bus tour without mention of the impending vice presidential announcement.

The tour will take Romney through North Carolina, Virginia, Florida and Ohio. All are battlegrounds where Obama won in 2008. They hold 75 electoral votes combined, of the 270 needed to win the election.

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Comments » 7

dregstudios writes:

So the economist joins the greed-ridden elitist to try and buy their way to the White House- What a team! Ryan will need to get fitted for his Magic Mormon Underwear soon! These sacred undergarments harness the power of the Almighty to cough up enough cash for their crusade to the highest seats in the land. See for yourself how these miracles are performed and how money plays its role in politics at http://dregstudiosart.blogspot.com/20...

August8 writes:

The only desperate people are the Crat's, they are toast now and they know it, thank God !!!

Mayor_McCheese writes:

in response to Genuine:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

You seem to express a very narrow point of view. Fortunately, most Americans do not share your perspective. Even most of those who will vote for Romney don't share your warped world view. Most voters are thoughtful people who have one opinion or another. People like you are political drama queens. Comments like "a guy who call himself president" and "Conservatives tend to be Christian" make you sound rediculous.

For starters, Obama was ELECTED President of the United States. He calls himself President because that is in fact who he is. You may not like it, but not accepting it is absolutely un-American. After Bush v. Gore, Democrats accepted the USSC's opeinion even if they didn't agree with it. You and other un-American's can't seem to accept what American's have accepted for over 200 years when their candidate lost an election. Your comments are treasonous and completely un-American. You probobly worship at the alter of Tim McVey. Next, to say that oOnservatives tend to be Christian suggest that you believe that being a Christian is in some way what clear thinking "real" Americans are. Well, if you know anything about US history, you would know that most of the founding fathers DID NOT consider themselve to be Christians the way that term is currently understood. Christmas was not even a National Holiday until almost 90 years after the founding of the republic. It was a regular work day in 1776, 1777, 1778, 1779, 1780, etc. . .

You may not like it, but America in 2012 is a far diferent place than it was when you were a kid and it will continue to evolve long past our days. That is one of the great things and strengths about America. The dustbin of history is litered with people like you who can't accept and adjust to changing times. You sound like a dinoseur holding a buggy whip.

Oh, I'm sorry. I must have also missed all of the race wars you speak of fueled by the presidential puppets - such drama. Racial tensions are far better today than any time in the last 50 years. I'm also unaware of any efforts to shut down conservative media outlets. Where do you come up with this stuff?

Open your eyes, grow up, and drop all of the drama. The sky is not going to fall - even when the President wins his second term.

RayNetherwood writes:

Mayor ... good comments, a little misplaced since it seems like we're slowly sliding into the dustbin of history.

The country is broken ... need a little race war lesson ... just look up the street at Zimmerman, you know, the poor "white" hispanic who Sharpton, Jackson, and all the brothers condemned (even Odumbo waded in with the "my son" comment) -- yet, in large cities across this nation they senselessly "pop" one another over drugs or "gettin' dissed".

Obama is a socialist at heart, in deed and thought ... he, you, and Klaus can deny it all you want. Doesn't change reality.

Anyone thinking Obama should be reelected is either of color or has bought into the class warfare being shoved down our throats. This country IS exceptional ..... we got lucky with size and geography, but it's the people that have made it great. Look at the Olympics, go stand in the middle of a really big supermarket, freely travel to San Diego by air, car, boat, bus, or bicycle and take a tour of the Midway.

It is US capitalism that has enabled US citizens and much of the rest of the world to thrive. Who doesn't thrive under capitalism? Dictators, theocracies, and socialist states. Obama, idiot-in-chief, doesn't get it and never will. Out the door in November!!!!!

Mayor_McCheese writes:

in response to RayNetherwood:

Mayor ... good comments, a little misplaced since it seems like we're slowly sliding into the dustbin of history.

The country is broken ... need a little race war lesson ... just look up the street at Zimmerman, you know, the poor "white" hispanic who Sharpton, Jackson, and all the brothers condemned (even Odumbo waded in with the "my son" comment) -- yet, in large cities across this nation they senselessly "pop" one another over drugs or "gettin' dissed".

Obama is a socialist at heart, in deed and thought ... he, you, and Klaus can deny it all you want. Doesn't change reality.

Anyone thinking Obama should be reelected is either of color or has bought into the class warfare being shoved down our throats. This country IS exceptional ..... we got lucky with size and geography, but it's the people that have made it great. Look at the Olympics, go stand in the middle of a really big supermarket, freely travel to San Diego by air, car, boat, bus, or bicycle and take a tour of the Midway.

It is US capitalism that has enabled US citizens and much of the rest of the world to thrive. Who doesn't thrive under capitalism? Dictators, theocracies, and socialist states. Obama, idiot-in-chief, doesn't get it and never will. Out the door in November!!!!!

I guess I just see things a bit more optimistically than you. The fact that there was no race war as a result of the Zimmerman event proves my point. Yes, some people vented and groused a bit - and it continues - but there were no riots like after the Rodney King event or others. If anything, Obama and Rick Scott calmed the situation.

How exactly has there been an erosion of capitalism in the US since Obama was elected? Even under the president you hate, the US Olympic teams have won a record number of gold medals and medals overall. We just landed the most sophisticated probe ever on Mars and the economy is recovering - although more slowly than we would all like. We have successfully privatized space travel (something all good conservatives should applaud,)gas is up a bit this week but still down from W and no where near the $5 - $8 Republicans promised us with Obama. The Stock market has recovered and the housing market is finally showing signs of life. Oh, and we got Bin Laden, but still no WMDs

It doesn't sound like the sky is falling to me. Don't let them try to scare you. Open your eyes and see what is really going on around you. Its really not so bad.

RayNetherwood writes:

I guess you're right, Obama would claim that the athletes didn't deserve their medals ... they only got them because of Him. Doesn't the narcissism make you just a little ill?? He's an AA nothing, right place, right time. That's it. Oh, and like NOT singlehandedly stopping the BP spill, he obviously flew that craft to Mars and landed it. Thank goodness we've got the anointed one, or we'd obviously have reverted back to the Stone Age.

Mayor_McCheese writes:

in response to RayNetherwood:

I guess you're right, Obama would claim that the athletes didn't deserve their medals ... they only got them because of Him. Doesn't the narcissism make you just a little ill?? He's an AA nothing, right place, right time. That's it. Oh, and like NOT singlehandedly stopping the BP spill, he obviously flew that craft to Mars and landed it. Thank goodness we've got the anointed one, or we'd obviously have reverted back to the Stone Age.

You can give the President credit for all good things that happen and for all of the bad things too. The truth is that the President has very little if any effect of most things, including the economy. As a result, change really happens very slowly - regardless of who is President. If you can accept that, then it really comes down to whom you feel more comfortable with.

My point was only that the world has not come to an end, Americans are still exceptional, we are climbing OUT of a very deep fiscal hole, we are still achieving great scientific feats, we are still the dominant power and culture in the world, the Dollar is stronger against the Euro than it has been in years, bad as it is, the US economy is still the safest place for foreigners to invest, etc, etc, etc.

Even if you think he is a Socialist, Kenyan-born Islamist with a secret agenda to undermine the United States, you would have to admit that he has been woefully unsuccessful in his goal to destroy America.

It sounds to me like you don't like his style. That the media plays him up, that he seems smug. I can understand that. He doesn't seem that way to me or to most Americans (according to all current polls). There are many people who feel the same way about Romney and Ryan.

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