Marco ex-cop still hopes to get job back despite careless driving conviction

Ed d'Alessandro

Ed d'Alessandro

Ed D'Alessandro, 54, a 10-year veteran and former New York police officer, now proceeds to an administrative hearing in March in an attempt to get his job back. He earned $68,621 yearly but was terminated in October due to violations of 10 agency guidelines, including "unbecoming conduct" and "willful misuse of police authority."

— A former Marco Island police officer's battle to get his job back hit a snag in late January when a judge found him guilty of careless driving for speeding without his lights and siren and crashing into a woman's car when he still worked for the police department.

Collier County Judge Rob Crown also revoked former officer Ed d'Allesandro's license and fined him $500 for the Aug. 13 crash that seriously injured Pat Stoye, an 80-year-old Marco police volunteer victim advocate.

Crown cited officers' testimony that a be-on-the-lookout alert for a hit-and-run vehicle d'Alessandro said he was responding to was called off two to three minutes before he hit Stoye, and witnesses' testimony that the police car was speeding, passing cars and weaving through traffic without its lights and siren on.

Crown ruled d'Alessandro wasn't driving in a prudent, careful manner and caused serious injuries to Stoye, who was taken by air ambulance to Lee Memorial Hospital in Fort Myers and treated in the intensive care unit.

The judge's decision pleased Stoye, who came to court using a cane, still suffering from her fractured leg. Stoye didn't testify because she doesn't remember the crash.

"We have a claim against all responsible parties and (the case) helped establish a responsible party," said Stoye's attorney, Sharon Hanlon of Naples, who hasn't filed a lawsuit but is pursuing an insurance claim to cover Stoye's hefty medical bills.

D'Alessandro, 54, a 10-year veteran and former New York police officer, now proceeds to an administrative hearing in March in an attempt to get his job back. He earned $68,621 yearly but was terminated in October due to violations of 10 agency guidelines, including "unbecoming conduct" and "willful misuse of police authority."

The internal affairs investigation that led to his termination was his first.

But it wasn't his only on-duty crash. He struck another vehicle in 2007 and hit a utility pole wire in 2006. Both caused damage to city vehicles. The Aug. 13 crash destroyed both cars.

Defense attorney Derek Verderamo and d'Alessandro declined comment, as did Marco Island police officials. On Monday, however, Verderamo filed a motion asking Crown to mitigate — reduce — the sentence.

In his testimony, d'Alessandro said he was searching for a white sport utility vehicle involved in a hit-and-run crash and was driving up to SUVs, then moving to the next one.

"Had (Stoye) not pulled in front of me, making what was an illegal turn, the accident would not have occurred," d'Alessandro testified. " ... I really don't think my speed was excessive."

The black box revealed Ed d'Alessandro was driving 80 mph on Collier Boulevard, a 35 mph zone, without emergency lights or sirens, six seconds before impact. It showed his northbound car was going 61.5 mph when it hit Pat Stoye's southbound car as she turned left onto Saturn Court.

He contended he had to speed because he believed the SUV was fleeing for other reasons and he didn't want it to leave the island.

During closing arguments, Verderamo contended d'Alessandro wasn't guilty of a traffic infraction.

"My client did absolutely nothing wrong to warrant careless driving," Verderamo told the judge. "It would be customary for him to travel at this rate of speed under the circumstances."

Verderamo was successful in getting the car's black box evidence tossed out because it's considered hearsay — inadmissible — without witnesses or evidence to certify and prove it was routinely calibrated. As a result, testimony only involved witnesses saying his speed was more than 55 mph.

The black box revealed d'Alessandro was driving 80 mph on Collier Boulevard, a 35 mph zone, without emergency lights or sirens, six seconds before impact. It showed his northbound car was going 61.5 mph when it hit Stoye's southbound car as she turned left onto Saturn Court.

He tried to stop, but skidded 121 feet before hitting her, causing both cars to spin and the patrol car to go over a sidewalk, roll over a park bench and land in palm trees. Stoye's Toyota Corolla was propelled about 220 feet and came to rest in the middle of the street.

Collier sheriff s Cpl. Karen Hebebrand investigated and found two contributing factors: d'Alessandro's speed and Stoye not yielding the right of way. She didn't ticket either driver.

However, after investigating, Marco police Sgt. George Williams cited d'Alessandro.

© 2012 marconews.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Comments » 20

kevdiaz69 writes:

You hired the skinny loser cop (Shemanator)back after he beat the shizz out of someone in bathroom of Flamingo with the Roid Cop Hennings...why not give Big Ed his job back.

NobodysFool57 writes:

Just careless driving for someone who sent their victim to intensive care by helicopter? You'd get that ticket for any fender-bender. He needs to move on, he apparently wasn't fit to continue in NYC and now proven he's no "keeper" here. As for the "Shermanator", unless he's learned his lesson about harassing patrons of "the bird" he'll be back on the streets (sans job) in no time.

marco826 writes:

"Had (Stoye) not pulled in front of me, making what was an illegal turn, the accident would not have occurred," d'Alessandro testified. " ... I really don't think my speed was excessive."
Thats what we need on Marco, a cop who is a liar and would say anything to save his own neck. I regretfully predict he will get his job back...fool and clown that he is.

MarcoCitizen writes:

Bad,unprofessional cops are a MIPD specialty. Behaviors that would put anyone else in jail are tolerated and protected if you are a cop. Why can't we have a professional force that can weed out these dangerous cops instead of sticking us with them?

marco97 writes:

After the next election the police dept. will be history.

woozygirl writes:

in response to marco97:

After the next election the police dept. will be history.

Hope ur right!

RayNetherwood writes:

My wife and I were leaving Joey's when the accident happened. It's a freaken miracle that Stoye wasn't killed. If there had been anyone walking, biking, or sitting on the bench which the police cruiser smooshed that anyone would probably be dead.

d'Allesandro needs to consider himself lucky and move on ... he oughtta be in jail.

Throat_Yogurt writes:

In an accident like this, EMS would have taken blood to determine if drugs/alcohol played any part in this. I'll assume this wasnt done bc he's a cop. $68K salary...no wonder our police budget is in the millions.

woozygirl writes:

in response to Throat_Yogurt:

In an accident like this, EMS would have taken blood to determine if drugs/alcohol played any part in this. I'll assume this wasnt done bc he's a cop. $68K salary...no wonder our police budget is in the millions.

$68K is one of the salaries. Some salaries are over $75K and above according to city records.

Throat_Yogurt writes:

AND turning left onto Saturn Ct from Collier Blvd is not a "illegal" turn. What a fat pos this guy is

RayNetherwood writes:

The picture is not very flattering, and a camera adds at least 10 pounds to most people, BUT ... Marco (all municipalities) should have performance standards for first responders be they cops, firemen, ambulance drivers, etc., that have to be met to get through the door and then maintained so long as they're employed (sort of like the military). d'Allessandro doesn't look height and weight appropriate, and if there were physical fitness standards ... run, push-ups, etc., doesn't look like he could pass them. I think we gave up reasonable/justifiable standards somewhere along the way .... we oughtta reinstate them.

panola60 writes:

It would appear that the vast majority of Marco residents would feel more comfortable and secure with permanently taking away his badge.

JohninMarco writes:

Note to Chief Hunter. The last time the city attempted to dismiss a police officer the city got a new chief and new city attorney. Now the player at the top changed but the staff in the pd who did the investigation and paper work are the same. I wish the chief well in this attempt.

happy6 writes:

the tub needs to go and stay gone...he was wrong this time and wrong the time before,...the union needs to drop this character...he ain't worth defending...but i'll bet the union will back his butt 100%...it's the liberal way.

MIslander writes:

When can this issue finally appear on a ballot???

MIPD is a waste of money.

RayNetherwood writes:

Klaus ... you're too quick sometimes to jump on things. The comment is 100% right on ... the problem Shadow points out is that the idiotic public service union (which should be outlawed/banned) will probably try to back d'Allessandro ... if he's a card carrying member. He could have sideswiped and killed the pope and they'd still try to say he's a great guy and deserves one more chance. Unions have simply GOT TO GO!!!!!

ajm3s writes:

This a great demonstration how a union position to support safety officers at all costs actually creates an environment in which public safety is at stake and hangs on the balance.

Sadly, this happens all the time, in which the "rights" of an officer are supported by a union to the extent it imperils the safety of its citizens. Ironically, officers are sworn to protect its citizens.

If we wish to seek clarity, simply ask the victim(s), who was served.

In the end, it is almost always about seeking monies and this officer through legal and union representation is willing to use all avenues to that end, and the victim and citizens watch with astonishment.

Pathetic and/or predatory?

RayPray writes:

in response to ajm3s:

This a great demonstration how a union position to support safety officers at all costs actually creates an environment in which public safety is at stake and hangs on the balance.

Sadly, this happens all the time, in which the "rights" of an officer are supported by a union to the extent it imperils the safety of its citizens. Ironically, officers are sworn to protect its citizens.

If we wish to seek clarity, simply ask the victim(s), who was served.

In the end, it is almost always about seeking monies and this officer through legal and union representation is willing to use all avenues to that end, and the victim and citizens watch with astonishment.

Pathetic and/or predatory?

The union is doing its job!

If you paid high duties to the union, you'd expect it to protect you too.

Who is not doing its job is the gormless City government, that first instituted the unnecessary and overmanned constabulary -- the joke of the county -- and then failed to resist these municipal unions whatever the temporary unpleasantness at the time.

26yearsonmarco writes:

This is my comment related to the Olivero Apology that did not appear in this paper:

I’m confused by this story, and I’m sure Tige Thompson was at the time of Oliverio’s arrest, when he was just doing his job.
Carr’s comment said “Thompson violated department regulations on the use of discretion in arrests, and alternatives to arrest and confinement,” and Hunter calling it “a result of some misinterpretation of information that the agency had received from the Chicago police department”.
We are also led to believe the arrest stems from a grudge Thompson has against Oliverio.
“Discretion”, Alternatives, Misinterpretation, Grudge”, to me, this sounds like an unprofessional “Old West” story, and not the way our Police Department should act when reacting to a crime.

bob3812 writes:

in response to woozygirl:

$68K is one of the salaries. Some salaries are over $75K and above according to city records.

there was nothign to suggest alcohol or drugs so would you even mention it. you think 68k is high, what do you think officers should get paid. I live in New Jersey, the average salary is about 120k for officers, I think your getting a deal for your pieceof paradise.

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