4 more years: Obama wins re-election

Scott McIntyre/Staff
Voters wait in line at the Bonita Springs Lions Club on election day Tuesday to vote.

Photo by SCOTT MCINTYRE // Buy this photo

Scott McIntyre/Staff Voters wait in line at the Bonita Springs Lions Club on election day Tuesday to vote.

Cell Phone: Nelson speaks about victory

Nelson tops Mack.

— President Barack Obama rolled to re-election Tuesday night, vanquishing former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and prevailing despite a weak economy that plagued his first term and put a crimp in the middle class dreams of millions.

"This happened because of you. Thank you" Obama tweeted to supporters as he celebrated four more years in the White House.

After the costliest — and arguably the nastiest — campaign in history, divided government seemed alive and well.

Democrats retained control of the Senate with surprising ease. Republicans were on course for the same in the House, making it likely that Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, Obama's partner in unsuccessful deficit talks, would reclaim his seat at the bargaining table.

Romney led narrowly in the popular vote, by about 30,00 votes out of more than 98 million cast, with ballots counted in 74 percent of the nation's precincts.

But Obama's laserlike focus on the battleground states allowed him to run up a sizeable margin in the competition for electoral votes, where it mattered.

He won Ohio, Wisconsin, Virginia, Iowa, New Hampshire, Colorado and Nevada, seven of the nine battlegrounds where the rivals and their allies poured nearly $1 billion into dueling television commercials.

Florida is still up for grabs but Obama has a 50,000 vote lead as of midnight with only Miami-Dade to be counted.

Romney was in Massachusetts, his long and grueling bid for the presidency at an unsuccessful end.

He won North Carolina among the battleground states. Florida remained too close to call.

The election emerged as a choice between two very different visions of government — whether it occupies a major, front-row place in American lives or is in the background as a less-obtrusive facilitator for private enterprise and entrepreneurship.

The economy was rated the top issue by about 60 percent of voters surveyed as they left their polling places. But more said former President George W. Bush bore responsibility for current circumstances than Obama did after nearly four years in office.

That bode well for the president, who had worked to turn the election into a choice between his proposals and Romney's, rather than the simple referendum on the economy during his time in the White House.

Unemployment stood at 7.9 percent on election day, higher than when he took office. And despite signs of progress, the economy is still struggling after the worst recession in history.

There was no doubt about what drove voters to one candidate or the other.

About 4 in 10 said the economy is on the mend, but more than that said it was stagnant or getting worse more than four years after the near-collapse of 2008. The survey was conducted for The Associated Press and a group of television networks.

In the battle for the Senate, Democrats won seats currently held by Republicans in Indiana and Massachusetts.

In Maine, independent former Gov. Angus King was elected to succeed retiring GOP Sen. Olympia Snowe. He has not yet said which party he will side with, but Republicans attacked him in television advertising during the race, and Democrats rushed to his cause.

Polls were still open in much of the country as the two rivals began claiming the spoils of a brawl of an election in a year in which the struggling economy put a crimp in the middle class dreams of millions.

The president was in Chicago as he awaited the voters' verdict on his four years in office. He told reporters he had a concession speech as well as victory remarks prepared. He congratulated Romney on a spirited campaign. "I know his supporters are just as engaged, just as enthusiastic and working just as hard today" as Obama's own, he added.

Romney reciprocated, congratulating the man who he had campaigned against for more than a year.

Earlier, he raced to Ohio and Pennsylvania for Election Day campaigning and projected confidence as he flew home to Massachusetts. "We fought to the very end, and I think that's why we'll be successful," he said, adding that he had finished writing a speech anticipating victory but nothing if the election went to his rival.

But the mood soured among the Republican high command as the votes came in and Obama ground out a lead in critical states.

Like Obama, Vice President Joe Biden was in Chicago as he waited to find out if he was in line for a second term. Republican running mate Paul Ryan was with Romney in Boston, although he kept one eye on his re-election campaign for a House seat in Wisconsin, just in case.

The long campaign's cost soared into the billions, much of it spent on negative ads, some harshly so.

In the presidential race, an estimated one million commercials aired in nine battleground states where the rival camps agreed the election was most likely to be settled — Ohio, New Hampshire, Virginia, Florida, North Carolina, Wisconsin, Iowa, Colorado and Nevada.

In a months-long general election ad war that cost nearly $1 billion, Romney and Republican groups spent more than $550 million and Obama and his allies $381 million, according to organizations that track advertising.

In Virginia, the polls had been closed for several minutes when Obama's campaign texted a call for volunteers "to make sure everyone who's still in line gets to vote."

In Florida, there were long lines at the hour set for polls to close. Under state law, everyone waiting was entitled to cast a ballot.

According to the exit poll, 53 percent of voters said Obama is more in touch with people like them, compared to 43 percent for Romney.

About 60 percent said taxes should be increased, taking sides on an issue that divided the president and Romney. Obama wants to let taxes rise on upper incomes, while Romney does not.

Other than the battlegrounds, big states were virtually ignored in the final months of the campaign. Romney wrote off New York, Illinois and California, while Obama made no attempt to carry Texas, much of the South or the Rocky Mountain region other than Colorado.

There were 33 Senate seats on the ballot, 23 of them defended by Democrats and the rest by Republicans.

Democratic Rep. Chris Murphy, a Democrat, won a Connecticut seat long held by Sen. Joe Lieberman, retiring after a career that included a vice presidential spot on Al Gore's ticket in 2000. It was Republican Linda McMahon's second defeat in two tries, at a personal cost of $92 million.

The GOP needed a gain of three for a majority if Romney won, and four if Obama was re-elected. Neither Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada nor GOP leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky was on the ballot, but each had high stakes in the outcome.

All 435 House seats were on the ballot, including five where one lawmaker ran against another as a result of once-a-decade redistricting to take population shifts into account. Democrats needed to pick up 25 seats to gain the majority they lost two years ago.

Depending on the outcome of a few races, it was possible that white men would wind up in a minority in the Democratic caucus for the first time.

Speaker John A. Boehner, R-Ohio, raised millions to finance get-out-the-vote operations in states without a robust presidential campaign, New York, Illinois and California among them. His goal was to minimize any losses, or possibly even gain ground, no matter Romney's fate. House Democratic leader Rep. Nancy Pelosi of California campaigned aggressively, as well, and faced an uncertain political future if her party failed to win control.

In gubernatorial races, Republicans picked up North Carolina, where Pat McCrory won easily. The incumbent, Democratic Gov. Bev Purdue, did not seek re-election.

In a campaign that traversed contested Republican primaries last winter and spring, a pair of political conventions this summer and three presidential debates, Obama, Romney, Biden and Ryan spoke at hundreds of rallies, were serenaded by Bruce Springstein and Meat Loaf and washed down hamburgers, pizza, barbecue and burrito bowls.

Obama was elected the first black president in 2008, and four years later, Romney became the first Mormon to appear on a general election ballot. Yet one man's race and the other's religion were never major factors in this year's campaign for the White House, a race dominated from the outset by the economy.

Over and over, Obama said that during his term the nation has begun to recover from the worst recession since the Great Depression. While he conceded progress has been slow, he accused Romney of offering recycled Republican policies that have helped the wealthy and harmed the middle class in the past and would do so again.

Romney countered that a second Obama term could mean a repeat recession in a country where economic growth has been weak and unemployment is worse now than when the president was inaugurated. A wealthy former businessman, he claimed the knowledge and the skills to put in place policies that would make the economy healthy again.

In a race where the two men disagreed often, one of the principal fault lines was over taxes. Obama campaigned for the renewal of income tax cuts set to expire on Dec. 31 at all income levels except above $200,000 for individuals and $250,000 for couples.

Romney said no one's taxes should go up in uncertain economic times. In addition, he proposed a 20 percent cut across the board in income tax rates but said he would end or curtail a variety of tax breaks to make sure federal deficits didn't rise.

The differences over taxes, the economy, Medicare, abortion and more were expressed in intensely negative advertising.

Obama launched first, shortly after Romney dispatched his Republican foes in his quest for the party nomination.

One memorable commercial showed Romney singing an off-key rendition of "America The Beautiful." Pictures and signs scrolled by saying that his companies had shipped jobs to Mexico and China, that Massachusetts state jobs had gone to India while he was governor and that he has personal investments in Switzerland, Bermuda and the Cayman Islands.

Romney spent less on advertising than Obama. A collection of outside groups made up the difference, some of them operating under rules that allowed donors to remain anonymous. Most of the ads were of the attack variety. But the Republican National Committee relied on one that had a far softer touch, and seemed aimed at voters who had been drawn to the excitement caused by Obama's first campaign. It referred to a growing national debt and unemployment, then said, "He tried. You tried. It's OK to make a change."

More than 30 million voters cast early ballots in nearly three dozen states, a reflection of the growing appeal of getting a jump on the traditional Election Day.

POSTED EARLIER

Media outlets are calling President Obama the winner. News organizations are giving Ohio to Obama putting him over the top for re-election.

"This happened because of you. Thank you" Obama tweeted to supporters" as he secured four more years in the White House.

Obama and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney swapped hard-fought battleground states Tuesday night in a tense duel for the White House shadowed by a weak economy and high unemployment that crimped the middle class dreams of millions.

Obama won New Hampshire, and Romney put North Carolina in his column, the first two of nine battleground states to fall.

The rest of the pivotal states were anything but settled — Ohio, Virginia and Florida among them — with long lines in some locations hours after poll-close time. Romney led in the national popular vote with 40 million votes, or 50 percent. Obama had 34.4 million, or 48 percent, with half of the precincts tallied.

But Obama led in the competition for electoral votes, where it mattered most. He led 234-200, with 270 required for victory.

The economy was rated the top issue by about 60 percent of voters surveyed as they left their polling places. But more said former President George W. Bush bore responsibility for current circumstances than Obama did after nearly four years in office.

About 4 in 10 said the economy is on the mend, but more than that said it was stagnant or getting worse more than four years after the near-collapse of 2008. The survey was conducted for The Associated Press and a group of television networks.

Democrats got off to a quick start in their bid to renew their Senate majority, capturing seats in Indiana and Massachusetts now in Republican hands.

In Maine, independent former Gov. Angus King was elected to succeed retiring GOP Sen. Olympia Snowe. He has not yet said which party he will side with, but Republicans attacked him in television advertising during the race, and Democrats rushed to his cause.

Polls were still open in much of the country as the two rivals began claiming the spoils of a brawl of an election in a year in which the struggling economy put a crimp in the middle class dreams of millions.

The president was in Chicago as he awaited the voters' verdict on his four years in office. He told reporters he had a concession speech as well as victory remarks prepared. He congratulated Romney on a spirited campaign. "I know his supporters are just as engaged, just as enthusiastic and working just as hard today" as Obama's own, he added.

Romney reciprocated, congratulating the man who he had campaigned against for more than a year.

Earlier, he raced to Ohio and Pennsylvania for Election Day campaigning and projected confidence as he flew home to Massachusetts. "We fought to the very end, and I think that's why we'll be successful," he said, adding that he had finished writing a speech anticipating victory but nothing if the election went to his rival.

But the mood soured among the Republican high command as the votes came in and Obama ground out a lead in critical states.

Like Obama, Vice President Joe Biden was in Chicago as he waited to find out if he was in line for a second term. Republican running mate Paul Ryan was with Romney in Boston, although he kept one eye on his re-election campaign for a House seat in Wisconsin, just in case.

Voters also chose a new Congress to serve alongside the man who will be inaugurated president in January, Democrats defending their majority in the Senate, and Republicans in the House.

The long campaign's cost soared into the billions, much of it spent on negative ads, some harshly so.

In the presidential race, an estimated one million commercials aired in nine battleground states where the rival camps agreed the election was most likely to be settled — Ohio, New Hampshire, Virginia, Florida, North Carolina, Wisconsin, Iowa, Colorado and Nevada.

In a months-long general election ad war that cost nearly $1 billion, Romney and Republican groups spent more than $550 million and Obama and his allies $381 million, according to organizations that track advertising.

In Virginia, the polls had been closed for several minutes when Obama's campaign texted a call for volunteers "to make sure everyone who's still in line gets to vote."

In Florida, there were long lines at the hour set for polls to close. Under state law, everyone waiting was entitled to cast a ballot.

According to the exit poll, 53 percent of voters said Obama is more in touch with people like them, compared to 43 percent for Romney.

About 60 percent said taxes should be increased, taking sides on an issue that divided the president and Romney. Obama wants to let taxes rise on upper incomes, while Romney does not.

Other than the battlegrounds, big states were virtually ignored in the final months of the campaign. Romney wrote off New York, Illinois and California, while Obama made no attempt to carry Texas, much of the South or the Rocky Mountain region other than Colorado.

There were 33 Senate seats on the ballot, 23 of them defended by Democrats and the rest by Republicans.

Democratic Rep. Chris Murphy, a Democrat, won a Connecticut seat long held by Sen. Joe Lieberman, retiring after a career that included a vice presidential spot on Al Gore's ticket in 2000. It was Republican Linda McMahon's second defeat in two tries, at a personal cost of $92 million.

The GOP needed a gain of three for a majority if Romney won, and four if Obama was re-elected. Neither Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada nor GOP leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky was on the ballot, but each had high stakes in the outcome.

All 435 House seats were on the ballot, including five where one lawmaker ran against another as a result of once-a-decade redistricting to take population shifts into account. Democrats needed to pick up 25 seats to gain the majority they lost two years ago.

Depending on the outcome of a few races, it was possible that white men would wind up in a minority in the Democratic caucus for the first time.

Speaker John A. Boehner, R-Ohio, raised millions to finance get-out-the-vote operations in states without a robust presidential campaign, New York, Illinois and California among them. His goal was to minimize any losses, or possibly even gain ground, no matter Romney's fate. House Democratic leader Rep. Nancy Pelosi of California campaigned aggressively, as well, and faced an uncertain political future if her party failed to win control.

In gubernatorial races, Republicans picked up North Carolina, where Pat McCrory won easily. The incumbent, Democratic Gov. Bev Purdue, did not seek re-election.

In a campaign that traversed contested Republican primaries last winter and spring, a pair of political conventions this summer and three presidential debates, Obama, Romney, Biden and Ryan spoke at hundreds of rallies, were serenaded by Bruce Springstein and Meat Loaf and washed down hamburgers, pizza, barbecue and burrito bowls.

Obama was elected the first black president in 2008, and four years later, Romney became the first Mormon to appear on a general election ballot. Yet one man's race and the other's religion were never major factors in this year's campaign for the White House, a race dominated from the outset by the economy.

Over and over, Obama said that during his term the nation has begun to recover from the worst recession since the Great Depression. While he conceded progress has been slow, he accused Romney of offering recycled Republican policies that have helped the wealthy and harmed the middle class in the past and would do so again.

Romney countered that a second Obama term could mean a repeat recession in a country where economic growth has been weak and unemployment is worse now than when the president was inaugurated. A wealthy former businessman, he claimed the knowledge and the skills to put in place policies that would make the economy healthy again.

In a race where the two men disagreed often, one of the principal fault lines was over taxes. Obama campaigned for the renewal of income tax cuts set to expire on Dec. 31 at all income levels except above $200,000 for individuals and $250,000 for couples.

Romney said no one's taxes should go up in uncertain economic times. In addition, he proposed a 20 percent cut across the board in income tax rates but said he would end or curtail a variety of tax breaks to make sure federal deficits didn't rise.

The differences over taxes, the economy, Medicare, abortion and more were expressed in intensely negative advertising.

Obama launched first, shortly after Romney dispatched his Republican foes in his quest for the party nomination.

One memorable commercial showed Romney singing an off-key rendition of "America The Beautiful." Pictures and signs scrolled by saying that his companies had shipped jobs to Mexico and China, that Massachusetts state jobs had gone to India while he was governor and that he has personal investments in Switzerland, Bermuda and the Cayman Islands.

Romney spent less on advertising than Obama. A collection of outside groups made up the difference, some of them operating under rules that allowed donors to remain anonymous. Most of the ads were of the attack variety. But the Republican National Committee relied on one that had a far softer touch, and seemed aimed at voters who had been drawn to the excitement caused by Obama's first campaign. It referred to a growing national debt and unemployment, then said, "He tried. You tried. It's OK to make a change."

More than 30 million voters cast early ballots in nearly three dozen states, a reflection of the growing appeal of getting a jump on the traditional Election Day.

POSTED EARLIER

President Obama has surged in Florida up by 40,000 votes over Mitt Romney as of 10:30 p.m.

The two have been going back in forth in Florida. At 9:20 p.m, Romney took a slim 9,000 vote lead. Obama had a 9,000 vote lead only minutes earlier.

President Barack Obama powered through the reliably Democratic Northeast, and Republican Mitt Romney secured his conservative base Tuesday night in a tense duel for the White House shadowed by a weak economy and high unemployment.

The battlegrounds that held the keys to the White House were anything but settled — Virginia, Ohio and Florida among them — with long lines in many locations long after poll-close time.

Romney led in the national popular vote with 17.9 million votes, or 50 percent. Obama had 17.2 million, or 48 percent, with 19 percent of precincts tallied.

The former Massachusetts governor also held an early electoral vote advantage, 153-123, with 270 needed for victory, although he lost his home state of Michigan as well as Massachusetts, where he served as governor.

Obama led in Pennsylvania, where Romney campaigned twice in the race's closing days.

The economy was rated the top issue by about 60 percent of voters surveyed as they left their polling places. But more said former President George W. Bush bore responsibility for current circumstances than Obama did after nearly four years in office.

About 4 in 10 said the economy is on the mend, but more than that said it was stagnant or getting worse more than four years after the near-collapse of 2008. The survey was conducted for The Associated Press and a group of television networks.

Polls were still open in much of the country as the two rivals began claiming the spoils of a brawl of an election in a year in which the struggling economy put a crimp in the middle class dreams of millions.

The president was in Chicago as he awaited the voters' verdict on his four years in office. He told reporters he had a concession speech as well as victory remarks prepared. He congratulated Romney on a spirited campaign. "I know his supporters are just as engaged, just as enthusiastic and working just as hard today" as his own, he added.

Romney reciprocated, congratulating the man who he had campaigned against for more than a year.

Earlier, he raced to Ohio and Pennsylvania for Election Day campaigning and projected confidence as he flew home to Massachusetts. "We fought to the very end, and I think that's why we'll be successful," he said, adding that he had finished writing a speech anticipating victory but nothing if the election went to his rival.

Like Obama, Vice President Joe Biden was in Chicago as he waited to find out if he was in line for a second term. Republican running mate Paul Ryan was with Romney in Boston, although he kept one eye on his re-election campaign for a House seat in Wisconsin, just in case.

Voters also chose a new Congress to serve alongside the man who will be inaugurated president in January, Democrats defending their majority in the Senate, and Republicans in the House.

In Maine, independent former Gov. Angus King won a Senate seat long in GOP hands, the first potential switch of the evening. He has not yet said which party he will side with, although Republicans attacked him during the campaign with television advertising, and Democrats rallied to his cause.

The long campaign's cost soared into the billions, much of it spent on negative ads, some harshly so.

In the presidential race, an estimated one million commercials aired in nine battleground states where the rival camps agreed the election was most likely to be settled — Ohio, New Hampshire, Virginia, Florida, North Carolina, Wisconsin, Iowa, Colorado and Nevada.

In a months-long general election ad war that cost nearly $1 billion, Romney and Republican groups spent more than $550 million and Obama and his allies $381 million, according to organizations that track advertising.

In Virginia, the polls had been closed for several minutes when Obama's campaign texted a call for volunteers "to make sure everyone who's still in line gets to vote."

In Florida, there were long lines at the hour set for polls to close. Under state law, everyone waiting was entitled to cast a ballot.

According to the exit poll, 53 percent of voters said Obama is more in touch with people like them, compared to 43 percent for Romney.

About 60 percent said taxes should be increased, taking sides on an issue that divided the president and Romney. Obama wants to let taxes rise on upper incomes, while Romney does not.

Other than the battlegrounds, big states were virtually ignored in the final months of the campaign. Romney wrote off New York, Illinois and California, while Obama made no attempt to carry Texas, much of the South or the Rocky Mountain region other than Colorado.

There were 33 Senate seats on the ballot, 23 of them defended by Democrats and the rest by Republicans.

Democratic Rep. Chris Murphy, a Democrat, won a Connecticut seat long held by Sen. Joe Lieberman, retiring after a career that included a vice presidential spot on Al Gore's ticket in 2000. It was Republican Linda McMahon's second defeat in two tries, at a personal cost of $92 million.

The GOP needed a gain of three for a majority if Romney won, and four if Obama was re-elected. Neither Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada nor GOP leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky was on the ballot, but each had high stakes in the outcome.

All 435 House seats were on the ballot, including five where one lawmaker ran against another as a result of once-a-decade redistricting to take population shifts into account. Democrats needed to pick up 25 seats to gain the majority they lost two years ago.

Depending on the outcome of a few races, it was possible that white men would wind up in a minority in the Democratic caucus for the first time.

Speaker John A. Boehner, R-Ohio, raised millions to finance get-out-the-vote operations in states without a robust presidential campaign, New York, Illinois and California among them. His goal was to minimize any losses, or possibly even gain ground, no matter Romney's fate. House Democratic leader Rep. Nancy Pelosi of California campaigned aggressively, as well, and faced an uncertain political future if her party failed to win control.

In gubernatorial races, Republicans picked up North Carolina, where Pat McCrory won easily. The incumbent, Democratic Gov. Bev Purdue, did not seek re-election.

In a campaign that traversed contested Republican primaries last winter and spring, a pair of political conventions this summer and three presidential debates, Obama, Romney, Vice President Joe Biden and Republican running mate Paul Ryan spoke at hundreds of rallies, were serenaded by Bruce Springstein and Meat Loaf and washed down hamburgers, pizza, barbecue and burrito bowls.

Obama was elected the first black president in 2008, and four years later, Romney became the first Mormon to appear on a general election ballot. Yet one man's race and the other's religion were never major factors in this year's campaign for the White House, a race dominated from the outset by the economy.

Over and over, Obama said that during his term the nation has begun to recover from the worst recession since the Great Depression. While he conceded progress has been slow, he accused Romney of offering recycled Republican policies that have helped the wealthy and harmed the middle class in the past and would do so again.

Romney countered that a second Obama term could mean a repeat recession in a country where economic growth has been weak and unemployment is worse now than when the president was inaugurated. A wealthy former businessman, he claimed the knowledge and the skills to put in place policies that would make the economy healthy again.

In a race where the two men disagreed often, one of the principal fault lines was over taxes. Obama campaigned for the renewal of income tax cuts set to expire on Dec. 31 at all income levels except above $200,000 for individuals and $250,000 for couples.

Romney said no one's taxes should go up in uncertain economic times. In addition, he proposed a 20 percent cut across the board in income tax rates but said he would end or curtail a variety of tax breaks to make sure federal deficits didn't rise.

The differences over taxes, the economy, Medicare, abortion and more were expressed in intensely negative advertising.

Obama launched first, shortly after Romney dispatched his Republican foes in his quest for the party nomination.

One memorable commercial showed Romney singing an off-key rendition of "America The Beautiful." Pictures and signs scrolled by saying that his companies had shipped jobs to Mexico and China, that Massachusetts state jobs had gone to India while he was governor and that he has personal investments in Switzerland, Bermuda and the Cayman Islands.

Romney spent less on advertising than Obama. A collection of outside groups made up the difference, some of them operating under rules that allowed donors to remain anonymous. Most of the ads were of the attack variety. But the Republican National Committee relied on one that had a far softer touch, and seemed aimed at voters who had been drawn to the excitement caused by Obama's first campaign. It referred to a growing national debt and unemployment, then said, "He tried. You tried. It's OK to make a change."

More than 30 million voters cast early ballots in nearly three dozen states, a reflection of the growing appeal of getting a jump on the traditional Election Day.

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Sen. Bill Nelson said he would continue work with Republicans to help unify the nation during his third term as United States senator.

Nelson said Americans are “tired of division and want unity.” He said Republican opponent Connie Mack was not his enemy, but his opponent and the now both sides need to come together to get the country back on track.

Grace Nelson, the senator's wife, introduced her husband, saying Floridians picked the right man for the job. She said tonight's results show elections can't be bought.

“You don't win in America by cheating, changing the ruls, bullying or hiding behind special interest money,” she said.

EARLIER

Mitt Romney is now back on top in Florida after early voting totals showed President Obama with a slight lead.

POSTED EARLIER

At about 8:30 p.m., with the Associated Press calling the race, U.S. Senate candidate Connie Mack hasn't yet come out to address the roughly 100 supporters at the Hyatt Regency in Estero. The Associated Press is reporting Mack will wait out the results for a while.

Attention has largely shifted to the presidential race, with a Fox News broadcast showing on a big screen beside the podium where Mack will address the crowd.

With roughly 5.8 million votes cast, incumbent Democrat Bill Nelson leads Mack by about 13 percentage points. It's nowhere near as tight as the presidential race, with President Barack Obama leading by 0.37 percentage points.

EARLIER

Sen. Bill Nelson is expected to take the stage around 8:40 p.m., Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer told a crowd of excited Nelson supporters a few minutes ago.

The Associated Press projected Nelson would win the race shortly after 8 p.m. Dyer made the announcement to the crowd, which erupted in a roar.

“You ready to get this party started,” Dyer asked the crowd.

Rod Smith, chairman of the state Democratic party, spoke at the event and said Orange County – Nelson's home county and where Orlando is located – delivered for President Barack Obama and for Nelson. Smith also sent a message to those people across the state still waiting in line at polling places.

“Tonight matters,” Smith told the crowd. “If you're out there tonight and you're still n line, do not step out of that line.”

Nelson is expected to thank the crowd for their support and for the opportunity to continue his service. He is also expected to call for bipartisan cooperation, according to a news release sent to the media around 8:22 p.m.

“I'd like to say that Connie Mack was my opponent – not my enemy,” Nelson said in the release. "You know, these days the extremists in our political system try to divide. We need to unify.

Gracie Fowler brought her two children – 7-year-old Havilah and 8-year-old Jackson – to the Orlando Democrats party. The Orlando resident said she and her children have been active in politics this year, campaigning for President Barack Obama this year and four years ago.

“I'm just so excited about the election,” she said.

Fowler said while she doesn't have an extensive knowledge of Nelson, she likes what she sees and feels like he's the best person for the job.

“I'm behind Nelson,” she said. “That's whose sign is in my front yard.”

Fowler's children danced in front of the stage as dozens of reporters did live feeds earlier in the evening. The crowd has grown as the night went on, and supporters of Nelson and other Orange County Democrats are dancing and cheering as they wait for the senator.

EARLIER

Twenty minutes after the polls closed at the Golden Gate community center, an elections official stood at the end of the line as the bearer of bad news.

“If you’re just getting here and you’re wanting to vote, you’re too late,” he said to two men who approached. “Sorry.”

“Seriously?” asked Andy Martinez.

“Serious as a heart attack,” the official said.

Voters in Golden Gate had different reasons for wanting to cast a ballot into the late hours of Election Day.

“Procrastination,” said Shannon Blair, who waited two hours.

“It’s more exciting,” said Gina Russen, who waited one and a half.

Martinez said he was busy at home cooking and cleaning. “I never got around to it,” he said.

Around 7:20 p.m., the last voter in line at the community center remained 186 paces to the front door. The line continued inside.

Karina and Adam Muse couldn’t say why they didn’t vote early or by absentee ballot.

“Next election,” Karina Muse said, “we’re going to.”

Susan Jennings-Wood became an American just after the 2008 presidential race.

So, she wasn't about to miss voting in her first presidential election - even if it did mean waiting in the dark.

"It's a privilege," she said. "No matter who you are voting for, the right to vote is a privilege."

Jennings-Wood was one of about 200 people still standing in line Tuesday evening at the Golden Gate Community Center as the polls closed.

Deputy Supervisor of Elections Tim Durham said two locations were still voting people after 7 p.m. - Golden Gate and in Immokalee. He said his office had sent "rovers," or more experienced poll workers, to those locations to help speed things along.

"People wonder why we can't send more machines, but the machines are programmed for the specific ballot of the precinct," he said.

Durham said the Supervisor of Elections Office had 120 ballot scanners out at the 60 poll locations.

"We deployed almost everything. We knew," he said.

But while some polling places had many people who voted early or absentee, others like Golden Gate Community Center were seeing swift business by voters on Election Day.

They included people like Guiseline Fortune, who stood in her high heels in the parking lot, waiting to vote.

"I have been working since 6:30 (a.m.) and I got off work at 6:30 (p.m.)," she said. "But this will be worth it. I have to vote. Our votes do count."

POSTED EARLIER

NBC News is reporting on its national newscast at 8:01 p.m. that U.S. Sen Bill Nelson is the projected winner in Florida over Fort Myers Congressman Connie Mack, a Fort Myers Republican.

The Associated Press also called the race for Nelson at 8:03 p.m.

POSTED EARLIER

The early results from Collier County have been reported and no surprise -- Mitt Romney has carried the county. Romney got 65 percent of the early voting and absentee voting.

In Lee County, Romney holds a slight lead over President Obama. Romney got 51 percent of the early and absentee voting in Lee County.

Statewide, Obama has 51 percent of the early and absentee votes.

Elsewhere The polls are starting to close in the eastern United States, and President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney each have an early victory.

Mitt Romney has captured West Virginia and its five electoral votes.

President Barack Obama is unpopular in the state, and West Virginia GOP officials have been hoping that would lead to victories for other Republicans on the ballot.

Romney earlier won in Kentucky, giving him 13 electoral votes overall, while Obama was the winner of Vermont's three electoral votes.

Vermont voters also re-elected Independent Sen. Bernie Sanders.

Still to come are the returns from the handful of states, including Ohio, Florida and Virginia, where Obama and Romney have concentrated their efforts in recent weeks.

An exit poll conducted nationwide today for The Associated Press finds that the economy is still at the top of the list of voter concerns, with 6 in 10 saying it's the biggest issue facing the nation.

POSTED EARLIER

Shorty after 7 p.m., Irena June was turned away at St. John the Evangelist Church in North Naples.

June said her husband thought the polls closed at 8 p.m., just as she did -- since that is the time polls close in her native country of Poland.

"It's just a mistake," said June, who would have been voting for the first time in the U.S.

"I'm disappointed."

June said she couldn't vote earlier because of her hospital work shift.

POSTED EARLIER

Lee County Elections Supervisor Sharon Harrington was urging county voters to be patient as they faced lines as long as five hours to cast their ballot Tuesday.

"We just want everybody to be patient. We used the same amount of equipment in 2008. We had some very long lines. I think it's amazing that people are so anxious to vote. It may take a little while, but we're going to get you through," Harrington said.

Wait times ran the gamut - from 30 minutes or less at some polls, two-plus hours and many and 5 hours and 10 minutes on the extreme side.

"We were hoping there weren't going to be long lines. We anticipated it to a certain extent," Harrington said. "There may be more issues later because of the amount of people using [the scanners.]"

Scores of voters attributed the delays to the optical scanning machines, which read the standardized-test style ballot the county uses. And in most cases there was a single machine per precinct.

"We do not have any additional equipment to deploy any extra DS200's [the scanning machine]. In the larger precincts we did add an extra one. We have some - I think 30 about 35 precincts that have more than one scanner, but they're larger precincts with more people in them. All the other ones just have a single scanner," Harrington said.

In north Collier, in a 15-minute period, the line for voting dropped from 40 to about a dozen around 6:30 p.m.

"I've still got frosting on me," laughed would-be voter Laura Olaski, who came straight from a shift in the bakery of a nearby supermarket.

After driving past a long line during early voting at the Collier County Public Library headquarters across the street last week, then a long line at St. Katherine earlier Tuesday, she waited until after her shift - about an hour before the polls closed - to cast her ballot.

Christa Whelan, her neighbor in the voting line, admitted to procrastinating and not understanding how early voting worked.

An Albany, N.Y., transplant, Tuesday was her first time voting in a presidential election in Collier County.

"I'm surprised to see how many people came out tonight to vote," Whelan said.

Both she and Olaski predicted higher turnout in this election than ever before.

"This is an important vote," Olaski said. "This could change our lives, literally."

There was no line to vote at 6:55 p.m. at Veterans Community Park in North Naples.

Back in Lee County, though the line at St. Leo's Catholic Church in Bonita Springs stretched three hours long early Tuesday, by 5 p.m., only about a dozen voters were waiting.

There was no post-work rush.

"It's not a bad time to vote," said Bruce Kirn, who said it took him 1 1/2 hours to cast his ballot.

Like at several other polling sites, the most time-consuming part of voting was feeding the ballots into the sole scanner at St. Leo's, the clerk there noted.

An afternoon shower forced poll workers to herd voters inside the church's community room, snaking around tables at a peak time, but that was the only problem at that site, the clerk said.

There was no wait at 5:30 p.m. at St. Mary's Episcopal Church on Bonita Beach Road when it started doing double duty, as a religious service began and voters trickled into a community room.

The polling site's clerk said about 650 people had cast their ballots at the location with only 90 minutes left to vote.

Heavy voter traffic in the morning tapered off around 1 p.m., the clerk said, with no indication of a post-work flood of last-minute voters.

READ THE NBC-2 REPORT

POSTED EARLIER

In the first 75 minutes the polls were open in Collier County on Tuesday, more than 6,000 people had voted. But not everything was smooth sailing on Election Day.

The Collier County Supervisor of Elections Office said the machine that checks in voters for precinct 594, which represents the southern portion of Immokalee, was not working this morning.

"We have a paper poll book to check in voters, so that the clerk can check in voters if the machine goes down. But apparently people panicked, didn't know what to do and there was a delay (in starting to use the poll book)," said Deputy Supervisor of Elections Tim Durham.

Durham said voters are now being checked in using the paper poll book and the Supervisor of Elections Office is sending new equipment to the voting site, which is the Immokalee Community Center. He added that the machine was tested before Tuesday's polls opened.

The voting sites can use the paper poll books to check in voters, however Durham said it is more time consuming and voters might have to wait a bit longer to vote.

Gov. Rick Scott shook hands with fellow Neapolitans on Tuesday morning as he and a few dozen voters waited in line to cast their ballots at St. Ann Jubilee Center in downtown Naples.

It took Scott, his wife Ann, their daughter, Allison, and son-in-law, Pierre, about 40 minutes to wait in line and vote by about 8 a.m.

Scott's grandson, Auguste Guimard, who turns 1 on Nov. 15, was too young to partake, but sported an "I voted" sticker on his left arm anyway.

"It's a great day for America," Gov. Scott said. "It's so exciting that we get to vote."

As of Tuesday, 4.4 million Floridians had already gone to the polls early or voted by absentee.

Scott said he voted for presidential hopeful Mitt Romney along with Trey Radel for the U.S. House of Representatives, and Rep. Connie Mack, who is hoping to snag a U.S. Senate seat.

"When Gov. Romney wins, you'll see an attitude of 'We like business,'" Scott said.

Scott said Floridians care most about jobs, education and keeping the cost of living low and that the federal government needs to do what the state's already doing to improve those conditions.

"Romney will help us accelerate what we've already done," he said.

Scott voted with his daughter and grandson at the same precinct, number 477, for the primary when Auguste first showed an affinity for news cameras, grabbing at a reporter's microphone.

Today, he grinned while reaching both hands out for two microphones as Scott gave an interview.

"I was just waiting for him to take one and put it in his mouth," Ann Scott joked later.

Laura Caliguiri and her father, Larry Caliguiri, greeted voters near the precinct with signs for the Republican ticket.

"It's going to be a clear Republican victory across the board," said Laura Caliguiri, 43.

Laura Caliguiri voted early but said she planned to hang out at the polls with her father for a few hours this morning to drum up last-minute support.

"It's always fun to vote on Election Day," she said of those who waited to vote until today. "There's always something that makes it."

The line outside the Golden Gate Community Center this morning spanned the front of the building and into the parking lot as more than 100 voters waited for a booth at about 9:15 a.m.

When 26-year-old Melda Dupont saw the line, she didn't turn away despite what would become a 75-minute wait at precinct 323 in Golden Gate.

"I wasn't discouraged," she said. "I have to go because it matters."

Leonor Esteves intended to vote early, but lines were so long at polling places last week that she didn't make it.

"I had my grandchildren," she said.

Esteves tried three different libraries before resolving to show up today, waiting for about two hours to fill out a ballot.

Campaign volunteers outside the community center said this year's lengthy ballot with 11 amendments was likely to blame for the wait.

"Most people have to read through a few times," said Kimberly Hill, who held signs for Mitt Romney. "But they have language help in there for Spanish and Creole."

Nearby, Jackie Alwan sat next to her van decked out with stickers in support of President Barack Obama.

"Can you guess who I'm voting for?" she asked, showing pins on her shirt for the same party.

Alwan voted absentee to clear her schedule for what she predicts will be a Democratic victory today. She planned to hold signs at the polls until 11 a.m.

"I'm partying tonight," she said.

In Bonita Springs, the line at Gospel Baptist Church was about 40 people deep. It was a mix of younger and older voters.

Fifty people were in line by 6:30 a.m., a poll worker told the Daily News. The wait shortly before 10 a.m. was less than an hour, and there were no reported problems.

People who can't stand for long, such as a man who arrived around 9:30 on crutches, were taken to the front of the line. Other would-be voters read books or chatted with neighbors in line.

At the Bonita Springs Lions Club, the line was about 70 people long shortly after 10 a.m. With about two dozen booths at the Lions Club, the line was moving quickly, with the wait at an estimated half hour, according to a precinct clerk. Some voters are dressed for the occasion, in American flag shirts.

The slowest part of the voting process there is scanning the ballots at the end, where a dozen voters waited in line inside to insert their sheets into the machine. That was taking voters the most time, the clerk observed in the first hours of voting Tuesday, and was apparent inside the precinct around 10:15 a.m.

Bonita Springs resident Mark Stuckey said he felt like voter turnout was better this election because of social media.

"Even on Facebook posts, people start having opinions," Stuckey said, while exchanging text messages with a friend who had been waiting for 90 minutes in line to vote at another Lee County precinct. "Then they go out and vote."

Next to him in line at the Lions Club voter line, Jack Gerkits said he didn't vote early because he's always voted on Election Day.

Stuckey plans to monitor the elections results until about midnight, while Gerkits said he'll turn on a movie and see the results in the morning.

The greatest thing about Election Day, he said, is "we don't have to see those ads anymore on TV."

p>Shari Monetta was five donuts and six hours into a long day of campaigning for local Republicans outside Max Hasse Jr. Community Park in Golden Gate at about 10:30 a.m.

"Gotta get my doughnut fix for the next four years, you see," she said with a Dunkin' Donuts coffee in one hand and a sign for Rep. Matt Hudson in the other.

Monetta has campaigned for the party for the past 16 years and woke up at 4:30 a.m. to put out signs this morning. Last week, she spent 70 hours at the polls for early voting.

But she said she doesn't enjoy the work.

"It's a necessity," she said.

The wait for precincts 551 and 552 was between 15 and 30 minutes for most voters.

Erin Toppe and Matthew Guyette waited for 30 minutes at the wrong precinct before they were sent across the parking lot to the correct one.

"It shouldn't be by precinct," Guyette said. "You should just be able to go to a building and vote."

Matt Coppens held signs for President Barack Obama outside the polls and recalled the 2008 election on his college campus. At the University of South Florida, students waited more than six hours to vote, he said.

Both Coppens and Monetta credit Jennifer Edwards, Collier County's supervisor of elections, with the short wait and smooth process today.

"She's a 5-foot bulldog in cowboy boots," Monetta said. "And I can say that because I know her."

Sign holders outside First Church of the Nazarene off of Airport-Pulling Road said the lines for voters moved quickly all morning.

Wait times shrunk from 40 minutes for the first voters to about 15 minutes for those who showed after 11 a.m.

Lines were longer outside St. Katherine Greek Orthodox Church in North Naples where voters queued in two lines through the front and back of the church. Wait times ranged from 30 to 45 minutes depending on the line.

In the back parking lot, strangers campaigning for separate parties passed the time talking pleasantly. No bickering here, they said.

"She's a sweet lady," said Timothy Parry of the Republican party.

"We just have different opinions," said Rusty Nunley, who wore an Obama shirt.

While they disagree on politics, both said they hope to avoid a repeat of the 2004 election.

"No hanging chads this year," Nunley said.

"We hope the count doesn't go late into the hours," Parry agreed. "It all depends on other states."

Heather Carrington brought extra foundation and sunscreen for her shift at the polls. She planned on holding signs and passing out flyers for Norman Feder, a candidate for seat 5 of the North Naples Fire Control and Rescue District , until 5 p.m.

"I've noticed a lot of younger people today," Carrington said. "A lot of mothers with their children."

Carrington spent 35 minutes in line this morning at Village Walk to vote, a wait longer than any she's seen at the polling place.

"Usually you're in and out," she said, adding that lengthy amendments likely have voters spending more time in the booths.

Alicia Rosa spent 45 minutes in line at the church and was out by noon. She skipped out on early voting to spend part of her day off today casting a ballot.

"Because today's the day you vote," she said.

North Naples resident George Oberdorster spent Election Day passing out 'Bye Bye Obama' bracelets to voters at a handful of Collier County precincts.

Photo by KRISTINE GILL // Buy this photo

North Naples resident George Oberdorster spent Election Day passing out "Bye Bye Obama" bracelets to voters at a handful of Collier County precincts.

North Naples resident George Oberdorster spent the day passing out "Bye Bye Obama" bracelets to voters at a handful of Collier County precincts.

Oberdorster, 32, had the bands made up when he and a friend set out to start a business selling them.

They've been sitting in storage since he and his partner decided not to go ahead with the idea, so Oberdorster gave them out for free Tuesday.

"I'm just voicing my freedom of speech for my political decision," he said.

Of the 1,500 bands he had made, Oberdorster passed out about 88 at precinct 202 at the Vanderbilt Presbyterian Church before passing out dozens more at Veterans Community Park, precinct 258. He plans to pass out 250 more tonight.

Voters who accepted them gave him a thumbs up and handshakes and those who didn't just walked by, he said.

"The bands are going to be a hot commodity if Romney wins," he said. "And of course if Obama wins, they'll probably go in the trash."

---

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Comments » 40

WhiskeyTangoFoxtrot writes:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

MrBreeze writes:

Klas,Congrats your guy won. I hope you are right as I see the anger of divide. This election has divided the country in a very bad way the same way that Marco Island is divided under the current City leadership.

I do not believe in one party or the next, I just look at what has the person accomplished or set out to do. I hope Obama can stop blaming everone else and run his own show as he has won the election and the slate is now clean.

I am thrilled that the new guys won the Council seats and I am relieved to think they will stand up for the residents, not pit condo vs. homeowner, have sensable spending so we all can enjoy our piece of paradise and not be sold out.

RayPray writes:

The greatness of the Great OBAMA is now beyond human reckoning!

The greedy 1% of millionaires & billionaires (anyone not on welfare or snoozing in a government unionized job and making, say, over $50K) must pay for opposing HIS will.

Check you bank balance & net worth.

A year from now, after the Great OBAMA pushes you over the fiscal cliff it will be substantially worse....

26yearsonmarco writes:

Let's not give up hope yet and wait for the outcome of the hearings on the Libya massacre of four Americans on American soil due to obama's lack of leadership.

Clinton was almost impeached for leaving stains on the carpet in the Oval Office, and if obama’s lack of action does not lead to impeachment, I will be shocked.

No_more_cyber_bullying (Inactive) writes:

Think about this 26. If there is, in fact, an impeachment will we be ready for the rioting 87%?

26yearsonmarco writes:

in response to No_more_cyber_bullying:

Think about this 26. If there is, in fact, an impeachment will we be ready for the rioting 87%?

Look's like they are ready in NJ & NY.

Looting Reaches Epidemic Levels...

Homeowners Issue Warnings To Looters Following Superstorm Sandy

Residents On Long Island, In NYC's Outer Boroughs, N.J. Arm Up To Make Stand

Para_Rescue_38th writes:

Obama's version of the democratic process is where people who don't work get to choose how much taxes I have to pay to support them.

Para_Rescue_38th writes:

By the way, Klaus, are you even a citizen of the United States of America? Sounds to me like your political ideologies are very similar to 1939 Germany!!

MrBreeze writes:

Klaus is very good on his wourld history. I give him much credit for that. He can quote many things,times and events. I believe he was or is a history professor or historian. So do not insult the man's intellect. He has shown by my observance to know his history.

He also states and I believe to be true he has been a property owner since 1971 (Deltona Era).
I respect people that can tell history as fact as they have lived during that time period.

Para_Rescue_38th writes:

I didn't insult anyone, I simply asked the very outspoken Klaus a question. Additionally, if he is an historian he would see similarities in Obamas policies to that of many failed countries throughout history. Acting like Obama is the great Messah is the same way Germans acted when Hilter took power...that my friend is not an insult but a fact.

MrBreeze writes:

Para Rescue, I agree that is how Hitler took power. My point was many people take aim at him (Klas) and one can see by his writings that he is from another country. Never the less he is entitled to his opinion and I would agree if he toned down his posts and stay to the facts he would not upset as many folks on this blog as he tends to do.

It is obivious he is a Obama supporter and he has ever right to be that is called freedom and America.

ajm3s writes:

in response to GorchFock:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

K:

My predition tally was way off, and after reading your posts, it was obvious you and I have different views of America. But you shown a European/World view of America that many Americans, like myself, have failed to recognize, that there is a changing demography that is influencing elections.

I could go into a thesis of why Obama won, some of which you have touched on. My regret is that I believed America was on a steady course to a revitalization of understanding the benefits of a Constitution that acts as a solid blueprint for dealing with any demography, because its framework is based on basic principles (individual freedom and small central government) and dealing with the frailties of human nature (incorporation of branches of government with checks and balance of power).

I regret the rise of popularism to prop up an incumbency, but to your point, the opposing party cannot win without support of Hispanics, and other demographics that are growing.

My vision for the future of America is that the Constitution will not become obsolete HOWEVER, it is difficult to oppose a central federal government that provides stuff for a larger portion of the American electorate.

Again, K you may be boisterous in your expression, but as I have learned throughout my life, times like these are very revealing, and cannot be dismissed by all the talking heads, irregardless of which side of the vote we chose.

Para_Rescue_38th writes:

Klaus, please answer my question; are you even a citizen of the United States of America? The country that I fought for? I am simply trying to ascertain if you have any stake in this election or if you are just another arrogant European. It's obvious your type of politics don't work...Europe is sinking and Obama wants the US to become part of the European Union; a one world government. Is that what you want?

And please don't skirt the issue; are you a citizen of our great nation? If not, please keep your Facist ideologies to yourself! I fought for the freedom of Americans to speak freely, not self righteous blowhard foriegners.

RayPray writes:

in response to rolomokat:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

"Whites are rapidly becoming the minority due to their apathy."

>>> No, due to their fertility, or lack thereof. The apathy they display is in the bedroom!"

RayPray writes:

in response to Para_Rescue_38th:

Klaus, please answer my question; are you even a citizen of the United States of America? The country that I fought for? I am simply trying to ascertain if you have any stake in this election or if you are just another arrogant European. It's obvious your type of politics don't work...Europe is sinking and Obama wants the US to become part of the European Union; a one world government. Is that what you want?

And please don't skirt the issue; are you a citizen of our great nation? If not, please keep your Facist ideologies to yourself! I fought for the freedom of Americans to speak freely, not self righteous blowhard foriegners.

"keep your Facist ideologies to yourself!"

>>> To equate the Great OBAMA to Hitler requires a monumental level of historical ignorance.

>>> Our dusky Helmsman lacks the imagination for an ideological Fascist. If anything, HE is little more than Some overly self-regarding Kerensky Social Democrat.

"It's obvious your type of politics don't work...Europe is sinking"

>>> Europe is sinking because genuine Judeo-Xtian Europeans, even historically fertile countries like Eire & Italy, fail to reproduce. Almost 15% of the residents of West Europe now consists of Mohammedans snuck in from Africa, who languish around the banlieus, collecting welfare and dreaming of jihad.

"I fought for the freedom of Americans"

>>> Everyone here is really impressed by your muscles.

>>> Where exactly did you join up to fight to free speech? After WWII, all our wars were worthless adventures. If you fought in any of these, you lost.

>>> You were being paid to defeat the enemy, but you failed!

Para_Rescue_38th writes:

RayPray, I fought in Vietnam and by the tone of your ignorant post you are exactly why this country is failing (throw urine on an old vet just like they did when I returned home). Respect for the military is paramount where I come from. My Dad fought on the beaches of Normandy, I served as a PJ until I retired in 1979 and my son served in the Marine Corp in Iraq & Afghanistan (that's Corp, not Corpse as YOUR president referred to them). You and your boyfriend Klaus, whose country was liberated by the blood of Americans were probably toasting Obama when he apologized to the very countries our men died fighting to liberate.

I am amazed anyone in their right mind could vote for Obama and when Klaus called him the great one it made me vomit.

Klaus, are you a citizen of the USA or not?

RayPray writes:

in response to Para_Rescue_38th:

RayPray, I fought in Vietnam and by the tone of your ignorant post you are exactly why this country is failing (throw urine on an old vet just like they did when I returned home). Respect for the military is paramount where I come from. My Dad fought on the beaches of Normandy, I served as a PJ until I retired in 1979 and my son served in the Marine Corp in Iraq & Afghanistan (that's Corp, not Corpse as YOUR president referred to them). You and your boyfriend Klaus, whose country was liberated by the blood of Americans were probably toasting Obama when he apologized to the very countries our men died fighting to liberate.

I am amazed anyone in their right mind could vote for Obama and when Klaus called him the great one it made me vomit.

Klaus, are you a citizen of the USA or not?

"You and your boyfriend Klaus"

>>> Wow, How shrewd of you to guess that like you we were both gay?

"whose country was liberated by the blood of Americans"

>>> Mostly it was Soviet troops who raped and plundered and their way across the Reich in 1945, obliterating, not liberating Germany.

"Respect for the military is paramount where I come from."

>>> More paramount than in Nazi Germany?

"are you a citizen of our great nation?"

>>> Tell me, if you truly think this is such a great nation, why then does it keep voting in such creeps and villains as the Great OBAMA, Nancy Pelosi, and Harry Reid?

http://www.chicagonow.com/life-as-i-s...

1Paradiselost writes:

NEWS FLASH: OBAMA WINS FLORIDA!

http://www.nypost.com/p/news/national...

FreshFace writes:

You cannot hope to win an election in the US if you are an extremist. Romney=EXTREME They have hate and fear on their side and those that feed off of that will vote for them...Thankfully that wasn't the majority but rather the minority of our great country. You cannot alienate people in our country and consider them second class citizens and expect to win an election. There are too many thinkers in our country now. The years of the "good ol' boy" era and sheep herding are over. When the Repubs find a middle ground they can recover, but until then the Dems will always win. I have no background in government or politics yet I understand this very basic logic.

2themoon writes:

in response to MrBreeze:

Klaus is very good on his wourld history. I give him much credit for that. He can quote many things,times and events. I believe he was or is a history professor or historian. So do not insult the man's intellect. He has shown by my observance to know his history.

He also states and I believe to be true he has been a property owner since 1971 (Deltona Era).
I respect people that can tell history as fact as they have lived during that time period.

Mcbreeze are you serious? Klaus a historian?. Any idiot with a computer can look like a genius with google.. The guy is anti Amercan socialist . I wish he would use spell check as much as he uses google history.

1Paradiselost writes:

Congratulations Klaus.......

American wins! The process works! Don't listen to all the racist rednecks that live here. They are just old angry white men. Many of them will be dead by time the next election cycle comes along. America is changing, support change, or get out of the way.

Glad to see all those multi-million dollar donors get their millions ripped off by Karl Rove and their FOX news friends. I thought Rove was going to start crying on camera. The man was in such denial of reality when they called OHIO for President Obama. One must wonder how much donor cash he put in his pocket?

How many poor families could have been fed with the money the Republicans spent lying to the American public?

Did anyone notice that Romney carried all the former Confederate States? It sickens me to see that racism is alive and well in the south, as well noted in this newspaper from many who blog here.

The Republican party has lost it's way, and soon will find it self going the way of the dinosaur.

The majority of Americans have spoken! The election is over. Time for us ALL to support America the country we love and move FORWARD!

2themoon writes:

Sgt Shultz you seem flustered ?!,?.,(your punctuation used)
Google is your savior ...dumm dumm...!, yes No DOUBT!

happy34145 writes:

Santa Klaus could you please google " how to stop making an (tried to use a naughty word) of yourself "

happy34145 writes:

Santa Klaus all I want for Christmas is for you to go back to the Faderland, far, far away from the good Americans on Marco Island who despise you so much, you dumpkof.

RayPray writes:

in response to FreshFace:

You cannot hope to win an election in the US if you are an extremist. Romney=EXTREME They have hate and fear on their side and those that feed off of that will vote for them...Thankfully that wasn't the majority but rather the minority of our great country. You cannot alienate people in our country and consider them second class citizens and expect to win an election. There are too many thinkers in our country now. The years of the "good ol' boy" era and sheep herding are over. When the Repubs find a middle ground they can recover, but until then the Dems will always win. I have no background in government or politics yet I understand this very basic logic.

"Romney=EXTREME They have hate and fear on their side"

>>> I had no interest in Robot Romney, but the guy was about as middle-of-the-road suburban bland as they come....

"You cannot alienate people in our country and consider them second class citizens"

>>> Illegal aliens = second class citizens now???

"until then the Dems will always win."

>>> Like taking the House two years ago and this year too?

"There are too many thinkers in our country now."

>>> Thanks for the major guffaw of the day!

>>> Here is what happens next. Second term GREAT OBAMA seeks to build 'his legacy'. Not much he can do at home, since GOP controls House. Moreover he has no further ideas beyond dumping more 'stimulus' $$$s on municipal unions.

>>> So he looks overseas. Sinking Europe really likes him.

>>> Perhaps he gets the navy involved in the Spratley Islands dispute.

>>> My guess though is our Great Helmsman decides to attack Iran. At first at least, this would be popular with our great thinkers at the WaP & NYTimes. Moreover, Israel would approve....

1Paradiselost writes:

26 What's your point?

A bunch of losers flying the flag upside down?

People have been protesting using the America flag since the 1790's.

That's the greatness of America, being able to say what you like without being arrested by the secret police. Protest is part of America's history.

Here is another group of wack jobs.....

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/polit...

2themoon writes:

Big mouth Santa Klaus is down to a one word vocabulary. Check out his last couple of posts.
Very impressive dumpkof

26yearsonmarco writes:

in response to 2themoon:

Big mouth Santa Klaus is down to a one word vocabulary. Check out his last couple of posts.
Very impressive dumpkof

Also note that 1P is BAAAAAAAAAAAAAACK!!!!!!!!!!

happy34145 writes:

in response to GorchFock:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

I want to thank all of you who have helped get 'Big Mouth' Santa Klaus down to his one word vocabulary. Gone are the days of needless incomprehensible posts and psycotic Obamma ramblings.

26yearsonmarco writes:

A CANADIAN NEWSPAPER EDITORIAL TODAY
IT SAYS IT ALL
……………
The Will of the People Has Spoken and America Died
The End of an Empire
Our Constitutional Republic died a peaceful death on November 6, 2012. Having reached the point of no return in a comatose state after years of progressive and illegal immigration assaults, the fabric of conservative society is now completely unraveled and Uncle Sam’s America is no more.
The United States of America is now relegated to the dust bin of history as a “has been” empire. The Shining City on the Hill, the hope of so many millions since July 4, 1776, no longer exists. What rises from the ashes is a country that few of us will recognize, like, or learn to accept submissively.
After 236 years of existence, a new country emerges today, run by secular progressives who rejected our Constitution, what we stand for, and who we are as a nation. The Supreme Court will be forever altered after its last conservative members will be replaced by the liberal academics who call themselves “progressives.” The rule of law will be implemented by Executive Orders, making Congress irrelevant.
The communist motto “Forward” that resonated with so many ignorant Americans will plunge us into many years of darkness from which we will never be able to recover. We have proven our Founding Fathers right, they did give us a Constitutional Republic and we were unable to maintain it.
The forces of the failed communist fundamental transformation that were driven underground in many places around the world, resurfaced with a vengeance in the United States and have now taken over.
How long we will still have freedom of speech, movement, assembly, and control of our private property remains to be seen. Faith and churches will be driven underground; allowing secularism to prosper and take deep roots among the progressives whose God is Mother Earth.
The welfare dependent Americans, unions, and illegal aliens have chosen for the rest of us the dark path of serfdom to big government and to socialist utopia.
Who would have guessed that the very people who were complaining that the government is not extricating them from disaster or giving them the help they needed in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, would vote for the very politicians who turned their backs on needy Americans after the lights went dark when the political photo opportunities ended?
Who would have guessed that Americans were as ignorant and irresponsible as to choose fiscal destruction over fiscal sanity for their children and grandchildren, secularism and communism over faith, dependence over personal responsibility and self-reliance?

26yearsonmarco writes:

Editoral Continued:

A CANADIAN NEWSPAPER EDITORIAL TODAY
IT SAYS IT ALL
……………

Americans have been protesting for the last four years the dismal state of the economy and the direction of our country, the corruption of our politicians, and the loss of personal and economic freedom.
Rallies in support of conservatism overwhelmed venues for Mitt Romney while rallies for our bumbling President became scarcer and scarcer. Yet, miraculously, at the ballot box, our President won all over the country.
We lost seats in the Senate. Americans chose liars and cheats to be their Senators and Representatives, rejecting those who protected the Constitution. The candidate from Massachusetts who claimed direct American Indian lineage to Pocahontas is now a Senator, having defeated Scott Brown. Representative Allen West lost his seat by a narrow margin to the infamous Wasserman Schultz from Florida.
Americans chose high unemployment, reduction of our military, communist indoctrination of their children, and loss of personal freedoms unlike we have never seen before in this country.
I am saddened by the loss of millions and millions of American soldiers who have died to preserve freedom yet we lost it on November 6, 2012. Those buried in cemeteries around the world and at Arlington must be rolling in their graves today. We shamelessly allowed their sacrifice of blood and treasure to go in vain. We have no honor because we let down all the soldiers who fought in recent times and returned home limbless with lives shattered from physical and mental wounds of war.
I mourn today the loss of my adopted country. I have fought hard over the last four years to prevent its overt and accelerated destruction but the darker forces stronger than many of us have overcome concerted efforts by millions of Americans to maintain the Republic. Mediocrity, sloth, godlessness, dependence, cowardice, using the law selectively or ignoring it, and hopeless corruption will define the new country. Only God can save us now with his mercy and grace.

1Paradiselost writes:

Which CANADIAN newspaper was the above in?

26yearsonmarco writes:

in response to 1Paradiselost:

Which CANADIAN newspaper was the above in?

This one:

http://www.canadafreepress.com/index....

Are you going to report them to the CIA????, or are you just having a problem swallowing the Truth??

1Paradiselost writes:

I have no problem with the truth.. that your a racist!

1Paradiselost writes:

26....
Thank you for the info in the artical you posted in todays paper from the "Canada free press"

Here is what is posted about that paper....

"Judi Ann T. McLeod (born 1944) [1] is a Canadian journalist who operates the whacko conservative Canadian website, Canada Free Press (CFP), which publishes news stories, features, and editorials. The main page of the website uses the title "Canada Free Press ...Because without America there is no Free World" and features a "Countdown until Obama leaves Office" (capitalization in the original)

So whacko eh? I guess only whackos read that Rag?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judi_McLeod

1Paradiselost writes:

From the Another Whacko Department......

A FLORIDA MAN who warned that he might harm himself if Barack Obama won the presidency was found dead two days after the election of an apparent self-inflicted drug overdose.
Henry Hamilton, 64, was discovered dead in his home on Nov. 8 alongside two empty bottles of prescription drugs and a living will on which he'd written "Do not revive! F--- Obama!"

His partner Michael Cossey told the Key West police that Hamilton was "very upset about the election results," The Miami Herald reported.

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/natio...

26yearsonmarco writes:

For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/artic...

26yearsonmarco writes:

Here is 1P's government at work:

http://washingtonexaminer.com/fema-so...#.UKQZzYWhA-M

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