Gulf oil spill trial set to resume Tuesday

FILE - In this Wednesday, April 21, 2010 file photo, oil can be seen in the Gulf of Mexico, more than 50 miles southeast of Venice on Louisiana's tip, as a large plume of smoke rises from fires on BP's Deepwater Horizon offshore oil rig. An April 20, 2010 explosion at the offshore platform killed 11 men, and the subsequent leak released an estimated 172 million gallons of petroleum into the gulf. The Gulf oil spill settlement trial has started in New Orleans, Monday, Feb. 25, 2013. U.S. District Judge Carl Barbier is scheduled to hear several hours of opening statements Monday by lawyers for the companies, federal and state governments and others who sued over the disaster. Barbier is hearing the case without a jury. The trial is designed to identify the causes of BP's well blowout and assign percentages of fault to the companies. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)

FILE - In this Wednesday, April 21, 2010 file photo, oil can be seen in the Gulf of Mexico, more than 50 miles southeast of Venice on Louisiana's tip, as a large plume of smoke rises from fires on BP's Deepwater Horizon offshore oil rig. An April 20, 2010 explosion at the offshore platform killed 11 men, and the subsequent leak released an estimated 172 million gallons of petroleum into the gulf. The Gulf oil spill settlement trial has started in New Orleans, Monday, Feb. 25, 2013. U.S. District Judge Carl Barbier is scheduled to hear several hours of opening statements Monday by lawyers for the companies, federal and state governments and others who sued over the disaster. Barbier is hearing the case without a jury. The trial is designed to identify the causes of BP's well blowout and assign percentages of fault to the companies. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)

NEW ORLEANS — A trial over the deadly Deepwater Horizon disaster is scheduled to resume Tuesday with testimony expected from Halliburton employee Jesse Gagliano, who was on the rig at the time of the April 2010 explosion.

Gagliano worked on the failed cement job that led to BP's well blowout. He was interviewed by a congressional committee and testified in 2010 before a government panel probing the disaster.

Gagliano invoked his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination at his deposition in 2011, but he later agreed to testify at trial. BP had argued that his late change of heart would give Halliburton an unfair strategic advantage.

The trial started Feb. 25 and is entering its sixth week. BP will begin presenting its defense once Halliburton rests its case, possibly later this week.

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