The week ahead in local and state government, Feb. 25-March 1

Florida Gov. Rick Scott, right, delivers his State of the State address to a joint session of the Florida legislature Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2012 in Tallahassee, Fla. (AP Photo/Tampa Bay Times, Scott Keeler)

Photo by Scott Keeler

Florida Gov. Rick Scott, right, delivers his State of the State address to a joint session of the Florida legislature Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2012 in Tallahassee, Fla. (AP Photo/Tampa Bay Times, Scott Keeler)

Here’s a look at some of the major state and Southwest Florida local government meetings that could generate news reports in the coming week:

Today

■ The Collier County Tourist Development Council meets starting at 8:30 a.m. in the Collier County Commission chambers at the Collier County Government Center, Administrative Building. The address is 3299 U.S. 41 East. Topics on the agenda include the proposed tourism grant guidelines for fiscal 2014, the Hideaway Beach erosion control project, peer review for the 2013-14 beach renourishment project and the Wiggins Pass Channel straightening project. The meeting will be broadcast live on Collier TV.

■ The Collier County Growth Management Division’s Transportation Engineering Department is hosting a public information meeting in an open house format regarding plans to rehabilitate the stormwater management system in Golden Gate. The meeting will be from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Golden Gate Community Center, 4701 Golden Gate Pkwy, Room D. There will not be a formal presentation.

■ Officials from the Florida Insurance Council and the Insurance Information Institute will hold a media availability at 10 a.m. in Tallahassee to discuss insurance issues expected to come up during the coming legislative session. Among those issues are personal injury protection, Citizens Property Insurance Corp., the Hurricane Catastrophe Fund, the federal health-care law and workers compensation.

■ The state Department of Education is conducting workshops on proposed rules for teacher evaluations. Teachers and others can speak on the proposed rules, which are at http://www.fldoe.org/profdev/pa.asp. The agency is holding two workshops on Monday, followed by others later in the week. Monday’s are at 4 p.m. at Broward College Central Campus, Bldg. 22, Room 136, 3501 SW Davie Road, Davie and at Gulf Coast State College, Gibson Lecture Hall, 5230 W. U.S. 98, in Panama City.

Tuesday

■ The state Department of Education continues workshops on proposed rules for teacher evaluations. Teachers and others can speak on the proposed rules, which are at http://www.fldoe.org/profdev/pa.asp. Tuesday’s sessions are at 4 p.m. at Florida Gulf Coast University in Estero, in the Sugden Resort and Hospitality Management Building, Room 110, 10501 FGCU Blvd., and at Florida State College at Jacksonville, Advanced Tech Center, Room T-140, 401 W. State St., Jacksonville.

■ Collier County commissioners are expected to weigh in on the plan to change the way the county spends the tourist tax revenue to boost marketing and beaches, while cutting museums and beach parks. The plan has shaped up as an alternative to raising the tourist tax to 5 percent, an idea commissioners may formally reject Tuesday. Commissioners also are to hear the results of audits of the Marco Island airport taxiway expansion and the Immokalee Sports Complex during their 9 a.m. meeting at the commission chambers on the third floor of the Collier County Government Center, 3299 U.S. 41 E. They are also expected to consider $8.9 million for construction of the Gordon River Greenway and a resolution in support of the second amendment.

■ Lee County commissioners are expected to decide on the design team and construction manager for improvements to Hammond Stadium, where the Minnesota Twins hold spring training. Their weekly meeting is at 9:30 a.m. at the Old Courthouse in downtown Fort Myers.

■ Edison State College’s Board of Trustees meets at 2 p.m. in room 223 of Building I on the Lee campus, off College Parkway and Summerlin Road.

Wednesday

■ The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments in Shelby County vs. Holder, a case out of Alabama that challenges a provision in the Voting Rights Act that requires some areas with a history of discrimination to get approval from the Department of Justice for any voting changes. The case could have ramifications, including for Florida, where five counties — including Collier and Hendry — are covered by the section of the law that the justices will consider. The session is at 10 a.m. in the Supreme Court building in Washington, D.C.

■ The Revenue Estimating Conference meets in Tallahassee to revise projections on Communications Services Tax collections, gross receipts taxes and how that translates into money available for public school construction. The estimates come as lawmakers are set to return in March to begin crafting budgets.

Thursday

■ There will be a Golden Gate Estates transportation public information meeting from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in the Corkscrew Middle School cafeteria, 1165 Oil Well Road.

■ The Lee Memorial Healthcare System board meets and is expected to discuss whether to proceed with an application to the state to build a hospital with up to 80 beds on the 33 acres it owns off Coconut Road.

■ The House Select Committee on the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) will meet in Tallahassee to discuss issues related to insurance regulation and the state-employee health insurance program. The federal law could spur changes on those issues, including the addition of temporary workers to the state insurance program.

■ The state Department of Education continues a workshop on proposed rules for teacher evaluations. Teachers and others can speak on the proposed rules, which are at http://www.fldoe.org/profdev/pa.asp at 4 p.m. at Valencia College, 8600 Valencia College Lane, Criminal Justice Institute Bldg., Room 152, Orlando.

Friday

■ The Social Services Estimating Conference will take another whack at the proposed costs of expanding Medicaid benefits to people up to 133 percent of poverty, an optional program under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. So far, the price of adding nearly 1 million people to the Medicaid rolls will cost between $3 billion and $26 billion over the next decade. Meeting in the Capitol, the panel of economists from the Legislature and the governor’s office will attempt to narrow that range as lawmakers consider whether to expand the program.

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