New on the art horizon – Goodland Arts Alliance hosts inaugural Arts & Music Festival

Artist Carolyn Burger stays cool and shady. The Goodland Arts Alliance held their inaugural Harbor Arts & Music Festival on Sunday at MarGood Harbor Park in Goodland. Lance Shearer/Eagle Correspondent

Photo by LANCE SHEARER // Buy this photo

Artist Carolyn Burger stays cool and shady. The Goodland Arts Alliance held their inaugural Harbor Arts & Music Festival on Sunday at MarGood Harbor Park in Goodland. Lance Shearer/Eagle Correspondent

— Art is boffo in Goodland. Even though it takes a little effort to find your way to MarGood Harbor Park, enough people did so on Sunday to keep the inaugural Harbor Arts & Music Festival bustling.

The art show, with 25 local artists exhibiting, plus a lineup of musical entertainment, was hosted by the Goodland Arts Alliance. It was nice to see the park being utilized, said Goodland resident Carolyn Roth.

“I love that the park is finally being used,” she said of the county facility, with ancient gumbo limbo trees sharing space with newly planted sabal palms. “It’s not like it was when Sandy and Elk Cannon had MarGood.” She strolled around the artists’ tents with her Yorkie, Molly, inspecting the paintings, pottery, photography, textiles, Calusa mask reproductions, and shell art on display and sale.

Jarrett Stinchomb’s paintings featured female nudes in the outdoors, sunsets and surfers, seeming to indicate he has a more interesting life than most of the viewers. Esau Rodriguez’ paintings, filled with skeletons smoking cigarettes, fish-headed women and jungle animals, might seem to indicate inner turmoil, were it not for his sunny deneamor and Mexican heritage. What appeared to be a cross between Hieronymous Bosch and Tim Burton was probably no more than an artist’s take on the Dia de los Muertes.

Photographer Kathleen Nimtz Rinaldo, who goes by the name of Kat, was all sunshine, both personally and in her work. Another photographer, Barry Howe, was kept busy taking the money for purchases and bagging up prints for the new owners.

Sales, as well as attendance, seemed to be going very well, said painter Tara O’Neill, who worked to organize the show.

“They made me be president” of the Goodland Arts Alliance, she said, standing in her booth wearing a pink cowboy hat, surrounded by canvases of beach scenes. O’Neill thanked the volunteers, plus Marco attorney, who provided pro bono legal assistance for the group. They are working to move into the abandoned cottages next to the park, and create an “artists’ village.”

It didn’t hurt turnout at the festival that the other Sunday afternoon event in Goodland, Sunday afternoon at Stan’s, was in full swing.

“Maybe it’s best if people stop in there, and have a few drinks,” before coming over and making art buying decisions, joked artist Lee Horton, chatting with fellow artists Carolyn Burger and Maggie de Marco.

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