White House, lawmakers reject clemency for Edward Snowden

In this video frame grab provided by LifeNews via Rossia 24 TV channel, which has been authenticated based on its contents and other AP reporting, former National Security Agency systems analyst Edward Snowden looks over his shoulder during a boat trip on the Moscow River in Moscow, with the Christ the Savior Cathedral in the background. LifeNews said the video was shot in September 2013 and Snowden’s lawyer, Anatoly Kucherena, confirmed the photo's authenticity. Snowden is calling for international help to persuade the U.S. to drop its espionage charges against him, according to a letter a German lawmaker released Friday after he met the American in Moscow. (AP Photo/LifeNews via Rossia 24 TV channel)

In this video frame grab provided by LifeNews via Rossia 24 TV channel, which has been authenticated based on its contents and other AP reporting, former National Security Agency systems analyst Edward Snowden looks over his shoulder during a boat trip on the Moscow River in Moscow, with the Christ the Savior Cathedral in the background. LifeNews said the video was shot in September 2013 and Snowden’s lawyer, Anatoly Kucherena, confirmed the photo's authenticity. Snowden is calling for international help to persuade the U.S. to drop its espionage charges against him, according to a letter a German lawmaker released Friday after he met the American in Moscow. (AP Photo/LifeNews via Rossia 24 TV channel)

— The White House and the leaders of the intelligence committee in Congress are rejecting National Security Agency-contractor Edward Snowden's plea for clemency.

"Mr. Snowden violated U.S. law," White House adviser Dan Pfeiffer said Sunday about the former systems-analyst-turned-fugitive who has temporary asylum in Russia.

"He should return to the U.S. and face justice," Pfeiffer said, adding when pressed that no offers for clemency were being discussed.

Snowden made the plea in a letter given to a German politician and released Friday. In his one-page typed letter, he asks for clemency for charges over allegedly leaking classified information about the NSA to the news media. "''Speaking the truth is not a crime," Snowden wrote.

Snowden's revelations, including allegations that the U.S. has eavesdropped on allies including German Chancellor Angela Merkel, have led to calls by allies to cease such spying, and moves by Congress to overhaul U.S. surveillance laws and curb the agency's powers.

But head of the Senate Intelligence Committee said if Snowden had been a true whistle-blower, he could have reported it to her committee privately.

"That didn't happen, and now he's done this enormous disservice to our country," said Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif. "I think the answer is no clemency."

The chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, Rep. Mike Rogers, called clemency for Snowden a "terrible idea."

"He needs to come back and own up," said Rogers, R-Mich. "If he believes there's vulnerabilities in the systems he'd like to disclose, you don't do it by committing a crime that actually puts soldiers' lives at risk in places like Afghanistan."

Rogers contended that Snowden's revelations had caused three terrorist organizations to change how they communicate.

Both lawmakers addressed word that President Barack Obama did not realize Merkel's personal phone was being tapped.

Rogers implied that he didn't believe the president, or European leaders who claimed they were shocked by Snowden's allegations.

"I think there's going to be some best actor awards coming out of the White House this year and best supporting actor awards coming out of the European Union," he said "Some notion that ... some people just didn't have an understanding about how we collect information to protect the United States to me is wrong."

Feinstein said she didn't know what the president knew, but said she intended to conduct a review of all intelligence programs to see if they were going too far.

"Where allies are close, tapping private phones of theirs ... has much more political liability than probably intelligence viability," she said.

Feinstein and Rogers have taken grief for defending the NSA. Feinstein's committee produced a bill last week that she says increases congressional oversight and limits some NSA powers under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. Privacy advocates say the measure codifies the agency's rights to scoop up millions of American's telephone records.

Former NSA and CIA director Mike Hayden said it was possible Obama did not know about the alleged Merkel phone tapping.

But he said it was "impossible" that Obama's top staffers were unaware. "The fact that they didn't rush in to tell the president this was going on points out what I think is a fundamental fact: This wasn't exceptional. This is what we were expected to do."

Hayden's defense of the president comes days after he reportedly criticized the White House's handling of NSA revelations, when a former Democratic political operative tweeted snatches of Hayden's phone conversation, overheard on an Amtrak train.

Pfeiffer appeared on ABC's "This Week," while Rogers, Feinstein and Hayden were interviewed on CBS' "Face the Nation."

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Comments » 4

WMissow writes:

.......and what would Fiendstein have done, if she received the documents......store them in the same place Obama's earlier, college and personal records are stored.

I am saying that Snowden did the right thing, but come on folks what's fair is fair.

All these records should be public knowledge and let the cards fall where the should.

WMissow writes:

Please requote..I AM NOT saying Snowden did the right thing.........

Konfuzius writes:

Snowden did the right thing! What do you want?
Big brother is watching you?
Not the land of the free!
Enough is enough!

RayPray writes:

Snowden is our Nathan Hale....

Why are News Corp employees on trial in London for phone hacking

http://worldnews.nbcnews.com/_news/20...

while 'What-Me-Worry' Merkel & Millions-more phone snoop & drone-mad war-kriminal OBAMA still hangs onto his Nobel Peace Prize?

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