Jewish Congregation of Marco Island's Deli Fest takes place Sunday

Corey Perrine/Staff 
Bernie Seidman, center, laughs with friends George Karpman, left, and Bert Thompson Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2014 at the Jewish Congregation of Marco Island. Those involved for Jan. 26, when the first annual Jewish Deil Fest is held, were busy making kosher style matzah ball soup. Five people combined and modified recipes from their grandmothers dating back over 100 years. The traditional eastern European dish is loosely known as 'jewish penicillin,' according to Estie Karpman, who made all 300 of the matzah balls.

Photo by COREY PERRINE // Buy this photo

Corey Perrine/Staff Bernie Seidman, center, laughs with friends George Karpman, left, and Bert Thompson Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2014 at the Jewish Congregation of Marco Island. Those involved for Jan. 26, when the first annual Jewish Deil Fest is held, were busy making kosher style matzah ball soup. Five people combined and modified recipes from their grandmothers dating back over 100 years. The traditional eastern European dish is loosely known as "jewish penicillin," according to Estie Karpman, who made all 300 of the matzah balls.

Bernie’s Deli might not be the Second Avenue Deli, Carnegie Deli or the Stage Deli, but the Jewish Congregation of Marco Island is promising delicious food and a trip down memory lane from 11:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday during its Deli Fest. It’s named for congregant Bernie Seidman who grew up helping his father in the family’s grocery store and deli.

Say the word deli and everyone thinks corned beef or pastrami on rye, kosher pickles, cole slaw, potato salad, knishes, fries or a grilled frankfurter with sauerkraut and mustard. Never mayonnaise, butter or milk, but you could always get a Dr. Brown’s cream, black cherry or cel-ry soda or hot tea to accompany your sandwich.

Kosher delis are disappearing across our country, but the volunteers at JCMI are going to whet your appetite and bring back that feeling of old when you visit during their Deli Fest. Not only will you get a kosher-style corned beef, pastrami or salami sandwich with homemade cole slaw and potato salad, you will also be able to get a bowl of homemade matzo ball or mushroom and barley soup along with a selection of homemade sweets from Bubbie’s Bakery. The delicacies include rugelach, strudel, mandelbrot, apple cakes and many other delights that your mother and grandmother used to bake.

The room will be set to enjoy your lunch or dinner in or to take out to eat at home. You can do both, eat in on Sunday and take out for another day during the week.

The Sisterhood has banded together to form Bubbie’s Bakery and will be selling a variety of homemade goodies. Estie Karpman has been baking for weeks and her Bubbie’s strudel is from a recipe that was passed down from her great-grandmother who made it in Russia. Karpman learned to make it while watching and measuring with her grandmother after school in St. Louis.

“It was difficult getting the exact recipe, because my grandmother measured by the handful with some of this and a little of that. I finally got the recipe when I made Bubbie put her handfuls into a cup or pinches in a measuring spoon to get the exact measurements,” Karpman said.

“Bubbie told me that the feel was easy when the dough was thin enough when it felt like a baby’s bottom,” Karpman stated.

Her grandmother made the strudel for many delis in and around St. Louis and Karpman helped bake and deliver the delicacy with her.

The wonderful smell of nuts and raisins has been lingering in Sandy Schuman’s kitchen as she rolls out her famous rugelach from a recipe taken from the “Barefoot Contessa’s Cookbook.” Everyone who tastes the rugelach wants more or asks for the recipe to make them at home.

Bernie Seidman and a group of men are busy making the soups and other congregants are baking, shredding, chopping and hocking to make certain that the deli will be a success.

The event is completely staffed by temple volunteers who have wanted to do this for the past few years, but wanted to make sure everything would be just right. They had a small deli during a rummage sale two years ago, and it was a sell out and couldn’t wait to do it on a bigger scale. The temple is also noted for its kosher hotdogs during bingo and people have been asking for a full-out deli to satisfy their hunger of being home and being at a familiar place. Home, family and community is important for the members of the congregation, and they make you feel at home whether at bingo or other temple events and their love of entertaining shows with their success. The Jewish Congregation of Marco Island will be the place to gather on Sunday to feel part of a community and to remember the foods you ate with your parents and grandparents.

Here is the strudel recipe from Estie Karpman, and the rugelach recipe from Sandy Schuman for you to make at home:

Bubbie’s Strudel

Dough

Ingredients

2 eggs beaten

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon sugar

1 -1/2 cups hot water, not boiling

1 cup oil

5 cups flour

1 cup sugar

1 tablespoon cinnamon

DIRECTIONS

1 Mix ingredients (use a mixer) and add flour to make dough. It will be soft, but let stand one hour in a covered bowl.

2 Roll out small pieces on lots of flour and make as thin as possible and oblong in shape. Should be about 15 inches long and 8 to 10 inches wide.

FRUIT FILLING

Ingredients

2 boxes white raisins

2 package apricots or 24 ounces apricot preserves

2 cans crushed pineapple, drained

1 pounds ground nuts if desired

1 box shredded coconut

2 24-ounce jars cherry or strawberry preserves

Zest and juice of one lemon or one orange

Graham cracker crumbs

DIRECTIONS

1 Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

2 Brush the dough with a layer of oil.

3 Sprinkle with a mixture of the sugar and cinnamon.

4 On half the area of the dough sprinkle with graham cracker crumbs.

5 Mix the fruits, nuts, coconut and juice and zest thoroughly together and spread fruit filling on top, about one and half inches high.

6 Take the end of the dough and roll over and then fold over both ends of the dough. Roll until you have a log.

7 Spray cookie sheet with oil and cover with parchment paper.

8 Place strudel log onto the sheet and brush tops of rolls with oil.

9 Sprinkle the cinnamon/sugar mixture on top.

10 With a sharp knife, score the top about every inch at an angle.

11 Bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes.

Yields 48-50 pieces of strudel

Sandy Schuman has been baking this recipe since 2001 and serves them at all her family events. When she bakes them for Rosh Hashannah they are the first to go.

Rugelach

Makes four dozen

Ingredients

8 ounces cream cheese at room temperature

1/2 pound unsalted butter at room temperature

1/4 cup granulated sugar plus 9 tablespoons

1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

2 cups all-purpose flour

1/4 cup light brown sugar, packed

1 -1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon

3/4 cup raisins

1 cup walnuts, finely chopped

1/2 cup apricot preserves, pureed in a food processor

1 egg, beaten with 1 tablespoon milk, for egg wash

DIRECTIONS

1 Cream the cheese and butter in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment until light.

2 Add 1/4 cup granulated sugar, the salt, and vanilla.

3 With the mixer on low speed, add the flour and mix until just combined. Dump the dough out onto a well-floured board and roll it into a ball.

4 Cut the ball in quarters, wrap each piece in plastic, and refrigerate for 1 hour.

5 To make the filling, combine 6 tablespoons of granulated sugar, the brown sugar, 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon, the raisins, and walnuts.

6 On a well-floured board, roll each ball of dough into a 9-inch circle.

7 Spread the dough with two tablespoons of apricot preserves and sprinkle with 1/2 cup of the filling.

8 Press the filling lightly into the dough.

9 Cut the circle into 12 equal wedges (cut the whole circle in quarters, then each quarter in thirds).

10 Starting with the wide edge, roll up each wedge.

11 Place the rugelach, points tucked under, on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and chill for 30 minutes.

12 Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

13 Brush each rugelach with the egg wash.

14 Combine three tablespoons granulated sugar and one teaspoon cinnamon and sprinkle on the rugelach.

15 Bake for 15 to 20 minutes, until lightly browned.

16 Remove to a wire rack and let cool.

Note: You can make the whole recipe and freeze the rugelach unbaked. Defrost completely before baking. This recipe can be made with raspberry jam or chocolate as fillings.

From Sandy Schuman taken from Ina Garten, “Barefoot Contessa.”

Connect with Sheila Mesulam at naplesnews.com/staff/sheila_mesulam

If you go

What: Jewish Deli Fest

When: 11:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 26

Where: Jewish Congregation of Marco Island, 991 Winterberry Drive (off of South Collier Blvd.), Marco Island

Cost: Free admission; food is for sale to eat in or take out

Information: 239-642-0800

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