Randell Research Center volunteer archaeologist Rose Shultz sifts through excavated dirt looking for small artifacts at a Calusa Indian archaelogical dig site on Pine Island which she gently cleans with a brush before being sent off to the center for analysis. There are two main theories that surround mound construction. One suggests that mounds sprawl like cities with the Calusa building out and adding on as the tribe grows. The other suggests that the Calusa begin building the mounds from the ground up and they grow over time, much like volcanoes.

Photo by MICHEL FORTIER, Bonita Daily News file photo

Randell Research Center volunteer archaeologist Rose Shultz sifts through excavated dirt looking for small artifacts at a Calusa Indian archaelogical dig site on Pine Island which she gently cleans with a brush before being sent off to the center for analysis. There are two main theories that surround mound construction. One suggests that mounds sprawl like cities with the Calusa building out and adding on as the tribe grows. The other suggests that the Calusa begin building the mounds from the ground up and they grow over time, much like volcanoes.

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