More than a school play  — Stage right, Sally Scrivner floats a blue veil down around 13-year-old Katey McCauley, transforming her into Mary, the mother of Jesus, for the annual St. Elizabeth Seton Christmas performance. Scrivner and fellow volunteer Jayne Rice put the array of costumes together for this cast of a dozen young actors. Rice has two granddaughters at St. Elizabeth Seton, and they had told teachers there about their grandmother's wonderful sewing skills. Other members of the sixth-, seventh- and eighth-grade chorus class are busy donning their own costumes before running through a dress rehearsal of 'The Most Wonderful Story Ever Told.' Stage left, a group of third-grade students prepare to make an orderly march to a set of bleachers for their contribution to the play. There's one last rehearsal before parents, family and friends fill the auditorium at Golden Gate High School. With all 226 students participating in the play, the performance and the patrons have outgrown the stage at St. Elizabeth Seton. For each year of the school's existence, the school has put on a Christmas production in one form or another. Now in its 25th year, the school plays have become a tradition, with preparations beginning as soon as the first school bell rings. Over the years, younger students who had singing parts are now teenagers, and some budding actors with roots in the dramatic arts that go back years. Center stage, Lois Carme, the school's first-year music teacher, keeps the third-grade students students smiling, focused and singing as they run through their performances. Carme taught school in Boston for 25 years. And, she says with a smile, she's a lawyer, which comes in pretty handy with the little ones. When the curtain rises, the tradition goes on. For the students and their families. Flashes pop and video cameras whir. The Christmas spirit descends on those in attendance.  Published December 25, 2006

Photo by MICHEL FORTIER, Daily News

More than a school play — Stage right, Sally Scrivner floats a blue veil down around 13-year-old Katey McCauley, transforming her into Mary, the mother of Jesus, for the annual St. Elizabeth Seton Christmas performance. Scrivner and fellow volunteer Jayne Rice put the array of costumes together for this cast of a dozen young actors. Rice has two granddaughters at St. Elizabeth Seton, and they had told teachers there about their grandmother's wonderful sewing skills. Other members of the sixth-, seventh- and eighth-grade chorus class are busy donning their own costumes before running through a dress rehearsal of "The Most Wonderful Story Ever Told." Stage left, a group of third-grade students prepare to make an orderly march to a set of bleachers for their contribution to the play. There's one last rehearsal before parents, family and friends fill the auditorium at Golden Gate High School. With all 226 students participating in the play, the performance and the patrons have outgrown the stage at St. Elizabeth Seton. For each year of the school's existence, the school has put on a Christmas production in one form or another. Now in its 25th year, the school plays have become a tradition, with preparations beginning as soon as the first school bell rings. Over the years, younger students who had singing parts are now teenagers, and some budding actors with roots in the dramatic arts that go back years. Center stage, Lois Carme, the school's first-year music teacher, keeps the third-grade students students smiling, focused and singing as they run through their performances. Carme taught school in Boston for 25 years. And, she says with a smile, she's a lawyer, which comes in pretty handy with the little ones. When the curtain rises, the tradition goes on. For the students and their families. Flashes pop and video cameras whir. The Christmas spirit descends on those in attendance. Published December 25, 2006

Buy this photo

Photo Rating:

Comments » 0

Be the first to post a comment!

Share your thoughts

Comments are the sole responsibility of the person posting them. You agree not to post comments that are off topic, defamatory, obscene, abusive, threatening or an invasion of privacy. Violators may be banned. Click here for our full user agreement.

Comments can be shared on Facebook and Yahoo!. Add both options by connecting your profiles.

Features