Lluvia and Frankie — Everyone from the street could see Lluvia Qeintana, 2, and her brother Frankie Gonzalez, 7, the day the air conditioning unit in their Immokalee home was removed for cleaning. First it was Lluvia, sitting in the window watching as the world passed by, happily waving to anyone who noticed her. Soon she was joined by Frankie, and the two squeezed together as if watching a television show from the small window. For Lluvia and Frankie the world isn't very complicated yet. They are oblivious, as most children their age, to the troubles of the world. They're at the age where Saturday morning cartoons are something sacred and Popsicles have their own place among the five basic food groups. But just because Lluvia and Frankie don't have much to worry about doesn't mean their mother doesn't worry about them, or who they're talking to. In a world where child abductions are becoming more common, you can never be too careful. It only takes a minute for a child to go missing — and according to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, nearly 800,000 children are reported missing every year. About 60,000 of those children were abducted by non-family members, they say. Sadly those numbers are increasing every year.  Parents can take small steps to better ensure the safety of their children. The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children says maintaining a healthy relationship with good communication with your child is a must. It also urges parents to teach children to always check with you — or another trusted adult — before going anywhere, accepting anything or getting in the car with anyone. Having recent photos of your children will help greatly in the event of a child abduction. It's also good to teach your children important phone numbers, so they can contact you in the event of an emergency. Published October 1, 2006

Photo by Anthony Souffle, Daily News

Lluvia and Frankie — Everyone from the street could see Lluvia Qeintana, 2, and her brother Frankie Gonzalez, 7, the day the air conditioning unit in their Immokalee home was removed for cleaning. First it was Lluvia, sitting in the window watching as the world passed by, happily waving to anyone who noticed her. Soon she was joined by Frankie, and the two squeezed together as if watching a television show from the small window. For Lluvia and Frankie the world isn't very complicated yet. They are oblivious, as most children their age, to the troubles of the world. They're at the age where Saturday morning cartoons are something sacred and Popsicles have their own place among the five basic food groups. But just because Lluvia and Frankie don't have much to worry about doesn't mean their mother doesn't worry about them, or who they're talking to. In a world where child abductions are becoming more common, you can never be too careful. It only takes a minute for a child to go missing — and according to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, nearly 800,000 children are reported missing every year. About 60,000 of those children were abducted by non-family members, they say. Sadly those numbers are increasing every year. Parents can take small steps to better ensure the safety of their children. The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children says maintaining a healthy relationship with good communication with your child is a must. It also urges parents to teach children to always check with you — or another trusted adult — before going anywhere, accepting anything or getting in the car with anyone. Having recent photos of your children will help greatly in the event of a child abduction. It's also good to teach your children important phone numbers, so they can contact you in the event of an emergency. Published October 1, 2006

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