Men unload cantaloupes from a truck at a public market in Mexico City, Thursday, July 19, 2007. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) banned all cantaloupe from Mexico in 2002 after four salmonella outbreaks traced to the fruit killed two people in the U.S. and hospitalized at least 18 others. While some Mexican cantaloupe exporters have regained the FDA's trust by adopting cleaner irrigation methods, Mexican melons are still often contaminated by sewage-laced water. In June alone, the FDA rejected six shipments of Mexican cantaloupe, 4 percent of the 139 total shipments from Mexico, because of salmonella.

Photo by Alexandre Meneghini, AP photo

Men unload cantaloupes from a truck at a public market in Mexico City, Thursday, July 19, 2007. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) banned all cantaloupe from Mexico in 2002 after four salmonella outbreaks traced to the fruit killed two people in the U.S. and hospitalized at least 18 others. While some Mexican cantaloupe exporters have regained the FDA's trust by adopting cleaner irrigation methods, Mexican melons are still often contaminated by sewage-laced water. In June alone, the FDA rejected six shipments of Mexican cantaloupe, 4 percent of the 139 total shipments from Mexico, because of salmonella.

Photo Rating:

Comments » 0

Be the first to post a comment!

Share your thoughts

Comments are the sole responsibility of the person posting them. You agree not to post comments that are off topic, defamatory, obscene, abusive, threatening or an invasion of privacy. Violators may be banned. Click here for our full user agreement.

Comments can be shared on Facebook and Yahoo!. Add both options by connecting your profiles.

Features