The 130-year-old Duquesne Incline, saved from demolition in the 1960s, provides a panoramic view of downtown Pittsburgh for visitors like 5-year-old Devin Zerjav on Thursday, July 12, 2007. Two inclined planes railways, also known as funiculars, still function in the city, where as many as 17 once operated. The Johnstown Inclined Plane, built in 1891, two years after the epic flood that obliterated Johnstown and killed more than 2,200 people, is used by tourists now, who pay $2.50 to $4 for a round trip.

Photo by Justin Merriman, New York Times

The 130-year-old Duquesne Incline, saved from demolition in the 1960s, provides a panoramic view of downtown Pittsburgh for visitors like 5-year-old Devin Zerjav on Thursday, July 12, 2007. Two inclined planes railways, also known as funiculars, still function in the city, where as many as 17 once operated. The Johnstown Inclined Plane, built in 1891, two years after the epic flood that obliterated Johnstown and killed more than 2,200 people, is used by tourists now, who pay $2.50 to $4 for a round trip.

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