Alberto Mascaro, chief of staff for the Office of Cuba Broadcasting, which oversees TV Marti, talks to a reporter in front of a map of Cuba in Miami, Friday, June 22, 2007. When it comes to the U.S. government's TV Marti broadcasts, more than two dozen recently arrived Cubans from across the island told The Associated Press the same thing: the programs aimed at offering an alternative to their government-controlled media aren't getting through. Despite a rosy State Department draft report circulated last month that suggested otherwise, experts in the U.S. and those who have visited Cuba agree the $20 million TV Marti broadcasts are still blocked.

Photo by Alan Diaz, AP photo

Alberto Mascaro, chief of staff for the Office of Cuba Broadcasting, which oversees TV Marti, talks to a reporter in front of a map of Cuba in Miami, Friday, June 22, 2007. When it comes to the U.S. government's TV Marti broadcasts, more than two dozen recently arrived Cubans from across the island told The Associated Press the same thing: the programs aimed at offering an alternative to their government-controlled media aren't getting through. Despite a rosy State Department draft report circulated last month that suggested otherwise, experts in the U.S. and those who have visited Cuba agree the $20 million TV Marti broadcasts are still blocked.

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