A researcher holds three Florida panther kittens pulled from their mother’s den in Everglades National Park in 2006, among some 500 born in just over a decade. The big cats have become much more prolific since the introduction of a group of female pumas from Texas rejuvenated the breeding population. (SHNS photo courtesy Copyright Science)

A researcher holds three Florida panther kittens pulled from their mother’s den in Everglades National Park in 2006, among some 500 born in just over a decade. The big cats have become much more prolific since the introduction of a group of female pumas from Texas rejuvenated the breeding population. (SHNS photo courtesy Copyright Science)

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