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Anatole Kurdsjuk, 77, lives in North Fort Myers with his wife, Linda. Kurdsjuk, originally from Russia, is the youngest of five children and was born after his family escaped the gulags of Siberia in the early 1930s, only to captured by the Nazis seven years later in Ukraine. His family was forced into the slave labor camps, and at age 10, he worked cleaning machinery at a Nobel dynamite factory. Kurdsjuk was liberated by Gen. Patton's Third Army, who then helped him locate his parents. The Kurdsjuk's immigrated to the United States in 1949, and Abe Kurdsjuk went on to write a book, 'The Long Walk Home,' about his family's experience during the Holocaust and the Stalin regime.

Photo by TRISTAN SPINSKI

Tristan Spinski/Staff Anatole Kurdsjuk, 77, lives in North Fort Myers with his wife, Linda. Kurdsjuk, originally from Russia, is the youngest of five children and was born after his family escaped the gulags of Siberia in the early 1930s, only to captured by the Nazis seven years later in Ukraine. His family was forced into the slave labor camps, and at age 10, he worked cleaning machinery at a Nobel dynamite factory. Kurdsjuk was liberated by Gen. Patton's Third Army, who then helped him locate his parents. The Kurdsjuk's immigrated to the United States in 1949, and Abe Kurdsjuk went on to write a book, "The Long Walk Home," about his family's experience during the Holocaust and the Stalin regime.

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