A library copy of the American classic novel 'Gone With The Wind' sits on a table inside the Grand People's Study House in Pyongyang, North Korea on Aug. 8, 2012. To come across Margaret Mitchell's 1936 Civil War epic in North Korea is to stumble over the unlikeliest of American cultural touchstones in the unlikeliest of places. In 'Gone With the Wind,' North Koreans found echoes of their own history and insights into the United States: bloody civil wars fought nearly a century apart; two cities - Atlanta and Pyongyang - reduced to rubble after attacks by U.S. forces; two cultures that still celebrate the way they stood up to the Yankees. If North Koreans have yet to find fortune, they haven't given up.

Photo by Associated Press

A library copy of the American classic novel "Gone With The Wind" sits on a table inside the Grand People's Study House in Pyongyang, North Korea on Aug. 8, 2012. To come across Margaret Mitchell's 1936 Civil War epic in North Korea is to stumble over the unlikeliest of American cultural touchstones in the unlikeliest of places. In "Gone With the Wind," North Koreans found echoes of their own history and insights into the United States: bloody civil wars fought nearly a century apart; two cities - Atlanta and Pyongyang - reduced to rubble after attacks by U.S. forces; two cultures that still celebrate the way they stood up to the Yankees. If North Koreans have yet to find fortune, they haven't given up.

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