Corey Perrine/Staff 
Suzanne Croche, from left, a volunteer, Hayley Howard, a child life specialist, talks with Daniel Spolar while repairing a 'Spider-Man' pinball machine at the Children's Hospital of Southwest Florida Monday, July 1, 2013 in Fort Myers, Fla. The Pittsburgh native, Spolar, has been collecting seriously with business partner David Denholtz since 2004. In 2007 they were contacted by the hospital saying that a machine had been sitting for a year and in need of service. Spolar thought the idea of a machine going to waste was not acceptable. He not only stepped in, fixed and maintains the machine today, but he helped to found projectpinball.org. Currently his collection is about 80 machines dating back to the early 70's to today's most current machines. He also has a few machines he's housing for friends who are willing to share them with private parties. A general contractor by trade, he's a self-taught repairman relying on the internet for his extensive knowledge in repair. Spoiler is now in the process of sharing his collection and commercial space, The Pinball Asylum, to host sanctioned events to private parties when approved through the city. Spolar's organization allows children at other hospitals by passing on knowledge to those who are interested in establishing a similar 501(c) (3), as well as fund raising efforts through his private collection. 'I do this because I enjoy it day in and day out. It gives me great joy I can bring children in pain, relief from stress and illness.' Spolar said. 'He has a superpower -- who do you call to fix a pinball machine?' Chris Griffith, a business associate added.

Photo by COREY PERRINE

Corey Perrine/Staff Suzanne Croche, from left, a volunteer, Hayley Howard, a child life specialist, talks with Daniel Spolar while repairing a "Spider-Man" pinball machine at the Children's Hospital of Southwest Florida Monday, July 1, 2013 in Fort Myers, Fla. The Pittsburgh native, Spolar, has been collecting seriously with business partner David Denholtz since 2004. In 2007 they were contacted by the hospital saying that a machine had been sitting for a year and in need of service. Spolar thought the idea of a machine going to waste was not acceptable. He not only stepped in, fixed and maintains the machine today, but he helped to found projectpinball.org. Currently his collection is about 80 machines dating back to the early 70's to today's most current machines. He also has a few machines he's housing for friends who are willing to share them with private parties. A general contractor by trade, he's a self-taught repairman relying on the internet for his extensive knowledge in repair. Spoiler is now in the process of sharing his collection and commercial space, The Pinball Asylum, to host sanctioned events to private parties when approved through the city. Spolar's organization allows children at other hospitals by passing on knowledge to those who are interested in establishing a similar 501(c) (3), as well as fund raising efforts through his private collection. "I do this because I enjoy it day in and day out. It gives me great joy I can bring children in pain, relief from stress and illness." Spolar said. "He has a superpower -- who do you call to fix a pinball machine?" Chris Griffith, a business associate added.

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