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Bracing for swine flu

** ADDS DETAIL IN FIRST PARAGRAPH ** Dr. Shimoni Tzvi is helped into a protective suit before entering the isolation room where a man who contracted the swine flu virus is hospitalized, at Laniado hospital in the Israeli coastal city of Netanya, Tuesday, April 28, 2009. The Israeli Health Ministry on Tuesday confirmed the country's first case of swine flu, saying a 26-year-old man who recently returned from Mexico had contracted the virus. Hospital officials said he has fully recovered. (AP Photo/Dan Balilty)

** ADDS DETAIL IN FIRST PARAGRAPH ** Dr. Shimoni Tzvi is helped into a protective suit before entering the isolation room where a man who contracted the swine flu virus is hospitalized, at Laniado hospital in the Israeli coastal city of Netanya, Tuesday, April 28, 2009. The Israeli Health Ministry on Tuesday confirmed the country's first case of swine flu, saying a 26-year-old man who recently returned from Mexico had contracted the virus. Hospital officials said he has fully recovered. (AP Photo/Dan Balilty)

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  • An Egyptian Health worker sprays chemicals to disinfect a local pigs farm in Cairo, Egypt Monday, April 27, 2009. Egyptian health authorities are examining about 350,000 pigs being raised in Cairo and other provinces for swine flu. (AP Photo/Mohammed Ahmed)
  • Riot police wear surgical masks during a protest in a neighborhood of Mexico City, Monday, April 27, 2009. About one hundred protesters in a working-class neighborhood of the capital took to the streets Monday, claiming they have been without water services for three days.  Mexico's government is ordering closed schools nationwide as the suspected death toll from swine¬†flu climbed to 149.  (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
  • Victor Calderon, General Director of Granjas Carroll de Mexico, stands next to pigs at one of the company's farms on the outskirts of Xicaltepec in Mexico's Veracruz state, Monday, April 27, 2009. Mexico's Agriculture Department said Monday that its inspectors found no sign of swine flu among pigs around the farm in Veracruz, and that no infected pigs have been found yet anywhere in Mexico.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), people can not get swine influenza from eating pork or pork products. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)
  • A woman wears a mask on her arrival from South Korea at the same time as other flights arrive from the United States at Auckland International Airport, Auckland, Tuesday, April 28, 2009. New Zealand's health minister says his country has 11 confirmed cases of swine flu - the first in the Asia-South Pacific region. (AP Photo/New Zealand Herald, Greg Bowker)
  • South Korean quarantine officials check on Tamiflu supplies at Incheon International airport, South Korea, Tuesday, April 28, 2009.  A South Korean woman tested positive for swine flu in additional examinations after traveling to Mexico, making her a 'probable' case _ the country's first _ authorities said Tuesday. (AP Photo/Yonhap, Lee Jung-hoon)
  • A masked South Korean quarantine officer takes a temperature of a baby arriving from the United States at Incheon airport, west of Seoul, South Korea, on Tuesday, April 28, 2009. A South Korean woman tested positive for swine flu in additional examinations after traveling to Mexico, making her a 'probable' case, the country's first, authorities said Tuesday. (Jung Yeon-je/AP)
  • A worker disinfects a classroom at Byron P. Steel High School in Cibolo, Texas, Monday, April 27, 2009. At least two confirmed cases of swine flu have been found in the area near San Antonio, caused officials to close Steele High School as well as all public schools and parks for a week. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
  • Workers disinfect a classroom at Byron P. Steel High School in Cibolo, Texas, Monday, April 27, 2009. At least two confirmed cases of swine flu have been found in the area near San Antonio, caused officials to close Steele High School as well as all public schools and parks for a week. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
  • Center for Disease Control and Prevention acting director Richard Besser addresses the media about recent outbreaks of swine flu during a news conference, Monday April 27, 2009, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Amis)
  • ** ADDS INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLORING OF THE IMAGE ** This 2009 image taken through a microscope and provided by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, shows a negative-stained image of the swine flu virus. The swine flu epidemic crossed new borders Tuesday with the first cases confirmed in the Middle East and the Asia-Pacific region, as world health officials said they suspect American patients may have transmitted the virus to others in the U.S. (AP Photo/Center for Disease Control and Prevention, C. S. Goldsmith and A. Balish)
  • ** ADDS DETAIL IN FIRST PARAGRAPH ** Dr. Shimoni Tzvi is helped into a protective suit before entering the isolation room where a man who contracted the swine flu virus is hospitalized, at Laniado hospital in the Israeli coastal city of Netanya, Tuesday, April 28, 2009. The Israeli Health Ministry on Tuesday confirmed the country's first case of swine flu, saying a 26-year-old man who recently returned from Mexico had contracted the virus. Hospital officials said he has fully recovered. (AP Photo/Dan Balilty)
  • Passengers wearing protective masks are seen in Benito Juarez International Airport in Mexico City, Monday, April 27, 2009.  Swine flu is believed to have killed 149 people in Mexico while the virus has been confirmed or suspected in at least a half-dozen other countries. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)
  • An Egyptian Health worker sprays chemicals to disinfect a local pigs farm in Cairo, Egypt Monday, April 27, 2009. Egyptian health authorities are examining about 350,000 pigs being raised in Cairo and other provinces for swine flu. (AP Photo/Mohammed Ahmed)
  • Mexican army soldiers wearing protective masks gather arrive to army barracks in downtown Mexico City, Monday, April 27, 2009.  Mexico's government is ordering closed schools nationwide as the suspected death toll from swine flu climbed to 149. (AP Photo/Enric Marti)
  • A health worker checks a woman at a health post in Mexico City, Monday, April 27, 2009.  Mexico canceled school nationwide Monday and warned the death toll from a swine flu epidemic believed to have killed 149 people would keep rising before it can be contained. Health Secretary Jose Angel Cordova said 20 of the deaths have been confirmed to be from swine flu and the government was awaiting results on the other deaths. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)
  • Riot police wear surgical masks during a protest in a neighborhood of Mexico City, Monday, April 27, 2009. About one hundred protesters in a working-class neighborhood of the capital took to the streets Monday, claiming they have been without water services for three days.  Mexico's government is ordering closed schools nationwide as the suspected death toll from swine flu climbed to 149.  (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
  • Policemen wearing surgical masks monitor the entrance to the General Hospital in Mexico City, Friday, April 24, 2009. Federal health authorities closed schools Friday across this metropolis of 20 million after at least 16 people have died and more than 900 others fell ill from what health officials suspect is a strain of swine flu new to Mexico. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)
  • An arriving tourist receives instructions from a health worker before passing through a thermal scanner that measures body temperature at the international airport in Santiago, Monday, April 27, 2009. The Chilean Health Ministry advised against travel to Mexico or the US after a strain of swine flu was detected in Mexico and the US which experts fear could become a global epidemic.  (AP Photo/Roberto Candia)
  • A group of nuns walk wearing surgical masks in the Zocalo plaza in Mexico City, Saturday, April 25, 2009. Mexico City canceled hundreds of public concerts, sporting events and meetings on Saturday as authorities in this overcrowded capital tried to contain an outbreak of a deadly new form of swine flu that world health officials warn could become a pandemic. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
  • A Chinese mainland tourist who failed initial temperature screening has his temperature double checked by health workers on his arrival at the International Airport in Hong Kong Monday, April 27, 2009. In Hong Kong, Thomas Tsang, controller for Hong Kong's Center for Health Protection, said the government and the territory's universities aim to jointly develop a quick test for the new flu strain in a week or two that will return results in four to six hours, compared to existing tests that can take two or three days. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu, Pool)
  • A man wears a decorated protective mask as he talks on his cell phone in downtown Mexico City, Monday, April 27, 2009.  A fatal strain of swine flu has been detected in Mexico while the virus has been confirmed or suspected in at least a half-dozen other countries.  (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)
  • Workers disinfect a classroom at Byron P. Steele High School in Cibolo, Texas, Monday, April 27, 2009. Officials at Steele High School closed the campus and the district's other 13 campuses for at least a week, hoping to stop any more possible spread of swine flu. At Steele on Monday, a crew of about a dozen custodians were wiping down surfaces with disinfectant for the second time since word of the virus emerged late last week. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
  • Residents wear surgical masks while riding the subway in Mexico City, Monday, April 27, 2009. Mexico's government is trying to stem the spread of a deadly strain of swine flu as a new work week begins by urging people to stay home Monday if they have any symptoms of the virus believed to have killed more than 100 people. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)
  • Marco Lugo walks through the Miami airport, Monday, April 27, 2009 after arriving on a flight from Mexico City for a family visit, wearing a protective mask. (AP Photo/J Pat Carter)
  • Pigs are seen on a farm run by Granjas Carroll de Mexico on the outskirts of Xicaltepec in Mexico's Veracruz state, Monday, April 27, 2009. Mexico's Agriculture Department said Monday that its inspectors found no sign of swine flu among pigs around the farm in Veracruz, and that no infected pigs have been found yet anywhere in Mexico. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), people can not get swine influenza from eating pork or pork products. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)
  • Erika Cruz, left, helps her husband Miguel Anguel Esquivel walk toward the emergency entrance of the National Institute of Respiratory Illnesses in Mexico City on Sunday, April 26, 2009. They were seeking help for Esquivel, who was visibly ill and was grunting, sweating and wearing tissue paper in his ears as the couple hurried to the hospital with him showing symptoms of the influenza virus that has plagued the city. (AP Photo/Houston Chronicle, Julio Cortez) ** MANDATORY CREDIT **
  • Custodian John Garcia cleans a desk at St. Mel's Catholic School, in Fair Oaks, Calif., Monday, April 27, 2009.  The school will be closed until at least Thursday while health officials determine if a seventh grader has a flu linked to the swine flu outbreak, according to an e-mail sent to parents. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
  • Karya Lustig, center, training manager at La Clinica de la Raza, trains clerks Mayra Torres, left, and Angelina Galvan in the use of a respiratory protection mask, which may be used for protection from the possible infection of the swine flu Monday, April 27, 2009, in Oakland, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
  • A woman wearing a surgical mask as precaution against infection stands inside a subway in Mexico City, Friday April 24, 2009. Mexican authorities said 60 people may have died from a swine flu virus in Mexico, and world health officials worry it could unleash a global flu epidemic.(AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)
  • Newspaper vendor Irene Flores wears a surgical mask as she sells newspapers at the US-Mexico border crossing in Tijuana, Mexico, Monday, April 27, 2009. President Barack Obama declared Monday that spreading swine flu infections were a concern but 'not a cause for alarm,' while customs agents began checking people coming into the United States by land and air. Headline reads in Spanish ' The virus spreads, 103 deaths.' (AP Photo/Guillermo Arias)
  • A police officer, wearing a 'Charro' uniform and a surgical mask, rides his horse in Mexico City, Monday, April 27, 2009. A fatal strain of swine flu has been detected in Mexico while the virus has been confirmed or suspected in at least a half-dozen other countries. (AP Photo/Denisse Pohls)

The same strain of the A/H1N1 swine flu virus has been detected in several locations in Mexico and the United States.

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