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Shark photos from the Naples Daily News Archive

A long night ends with some happy biology students from Ave Maria University, left to right, Corinne Mannella, Anthony Jay, and Joreen Belocura, hold a neonatal Bull Shark after being snagged in a net.  It was the first time Corinne and Joreen had held a shark.  Michel Fortier/Staff

Photo by MICHEL FORTIER

A long night ends with some happy biology students from Ave Maria University, left to right, Corinne Mannella, Anthony Jay, and Joreen Belocura, hold a neonatal Bull Shark after being snagged in a net. It was the first time Corinne and Joreen had held a shark. Michel Fortier/Staff

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  • A four foot lemon shark was one of the two sharks kept by the sea Trek charter fishing vessel of the coast of Ft. Myers. Despite their being 45 people on the 70 foot vessel was still only able to return with two sharks. Erik Kellar/Staff
  • Pat O'Donnell turns over the young Bull Shark, not more than a few months old, to determine it's' sex before tagging.  All of the sharks in the study give live birth to multiple pups.   Michel Fortier/Staff
  • A long night ends with some happy biology students from Ave Maria University, left to right, Corinne Mannella, Anthony Jay, and Joreen Belocura, hold a neonatal Bull Shark after being snagged in a net.  It was the first time Corinne and Joreen had held a shark.  Michel Fortier/Staff
  • Nothing but a solid grinn fills the face of Darin Nelson, right from Atlanta, while he poses for a photo with a black tip shark, the first he has ever caught in his life off the coast of Naples about 10 miles out in the Gulf of Mexico. The Sea Trek had to make a longer trip than usual beacuse of the large fresh water release from the Caloosahatchee River. Usually the vessel sits just off the Ft. Myers Beach shore. Erik Kellar/Staff
  • As the sunsets Kim Biagetti, from Naples, center, fishing pole bends with the stong tug of a shark. Each hook on everypole is baited with large sardines from each of the small white buckets that sit at the foot of everypole. Also as part of the process of catching sharks bloody water and scraps of fish known as chum are thrown into the water to attract the catch of the evening sharks. erik Kellar/Staff
  • Biologists from the Mote Marine Laboratory and Aquarium are catching and tagging bull sharks in the Caloosahatchee River to test the effects of human pharmaceuticals which end up in the shark's territorial waters.  Michel Fortier/Staff
  • Biologists from the Mote Marine Laboratory and Aquarium are catching and tagging bull sharks in the Caloosahatchee River to test the effects of human pharmaceuticals which end up in the shark's territorial waters.  Michel Fortier/Staff
  • Biologists from the Mote Marine Laboratory and Aquarium are catching and tagging bull sharks in the Caloosahatchee River to test the effects of human pharmaceuticals which end up in the shark's territorial waters.  Michel Fortier/Staff
  • Biologists from the Mote Marine Laboratory and Aquarium are catching and tagging bull sharks in the Caloosahatchee River to test the effects of human pharmaceuticals which end up in the shark's territorial waters.  Michel Fortier/Staff

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