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The Squire, Gene Sarazen

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One of the centerpieces at the club is the sculpture of golf icon Gene Sarazen, who was resident pro at the club until his death in 1999.

Photo by QUENTIN ROUX, Staff

One of the centerpieces at the club is the sculpture of golf icon Gene Sarazen, who was resident pro at the club until his death in 1999.

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  • One of the centerpieces at the club is the sculpture of golf icon Gene Sarazen, who was resident pro at the club until his death in 1999.
  • Gene Sarazen was the honorary chairman of the Tony Lema Memorial golf showcase for 14 years.
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Gene Sarazen, right, congratulates Fort Myers’ Bobby Nichols after winning the 1974 Tony Lema Memorial Tournament on Marco Island.
  • Gene Sarazen, left, Pat Brady and Ken Venturi at a 1987 golf tournament on Marco Island.
  • Gene Sarazen, left, and Bobby Jones, right, stand at the dedication site for a bridge on the 15th hole of the Augusta National golf course, for Sarezen, on April 6, 1955.
  • Byron Nelson, 85, left, Gene Sarazen, 95, center, and Sam Snead, 84, right, pose for photographers before teeing off to start the opening round of the Masters at the Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Ga., Thursday, April 10, 1997. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)
  • Gene Sarazen, left, is congratulated by Craig Wood of N.J., at the end of their 36-hole playoff game of the Masters Championship at Augusta National Golf Club, Ga., on April 8, 1935.  Sarazen won 144 to 149.  (AP Photo)
  • Gene Sarazen is shown driving the ball during the opening at the Augusta National Tournament in Augusta, Ga., on April 4, 1935.  (AP Photo)
  • Golfer Gene Sarazen, center, receives a check for $1,500 for winning the Augusta National Tournament in Augusta, Ga., on April 8, 1935.  Sarazen beat Craig Wood, right to win the tournament.  Grantland Rice on the extreme left is presenting the check.  (AP Photo)
  • Golfer Gene Sarazen hits the first ball to open the 1985 Masters Golf Championship at the Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Ga., on April 11, 1985. Sarazen was one of only four men to win all four of golf's major professional championships. (AP Photo/Bill Haber)
  • Nicknamed 'The Squire,' the late Gene Sarazen, golf icon and Marco Island resident, is pictured here in 1992 when we was in his 90s teeing off during an annual benefit golf tournament named in his honor and held on his birthday on the island. Sarazen became the first golfer to win the four modern major tournaments: The Masters (1934); U.S. Open (1922 at the age of 20, and 1932), British Open (1932), and PGA Championship (1922, 1923, 1933). Sarazen was also on six Ryder Cup teams and was a first-year member of both the PGA Hall of Fame and PGA World Golf Hall of Fame. The double eagle he recorded during the 1935 Masters at Augusta National is one of the game's most historic accomplishments. Eric Strachan/Naples Daily News
  • Nicknamed 'The Squire,' the late Gene Sarazen, golf icon and Marco Island resident picture in the early 1990s. Daily News file
  • Mourners attend the funeral services for golf legend Gene Sarazen Thursday morning May 17, 1999, at the San Marco Catholic Church in Marco Island, Fla. Sarazen, the first of four golfers to win all four major championships, died Thursday of pneumonia. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)

Gene Sarazen was a longtime Marco Island resident who died in May 1999 at the age of 97. Sarazen, nicknamed 'The Squire' in part of because of the traditional plus-fours he wore, is one of five golfers to win the modern Grand Slam. He hit 'The Shot Heard 'Round the World,' a double-eagle on No. 15 in the 1935 Masters. That tied him with Craig Wood, and Sarazen beat Wood in a 36-hole playoff the following day. April 7, 2010 was the 75th anniversary of Sarazen's double-eagle.

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