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American Indian Cultural Celebration

From left, Yeamah Isabell, 9, Ashley Peat, 10, and Taylor James, 9, all of Girl Scout Troop 10832 in Davie, Fla., pet an alligator during the 'critter show' at the 13th Annual American Indian Arts Celebration at Big Cypress Seminole Indian Reservation on Saturday, Nov. 6, 2010. The three-day weekend event brought Native American visual artists, dancers, performers, crafts people and vendors, representing over 14 tribes from across the country, to Southwest Florida to promote Native American cultural heritage. Sponsored by the Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum in Big Cypress, the festival also includes alligator wrestling, traditional house building demonstrations, a children's craft corner, food vendors and performances by Martha Redbone, Hank Nelson, Jr. and Cowbone. The celebration continues on Sunday from 11 A.M. to 3:45 P.M.. Tristan Spinski/Staff

Photo by TRISTAN SPINSKI

From left, Yeamah Isabell, 9, Ashley Peat, 10, and Taylor James, 9, all of Girl Scout Troop 10832 in Davie, Fla., pet an alligator during the "critter show" at the 13th Annual American Indian Arts Celebration at Big Cypress Seminole Indian Reservation on Saturday, Nov. 6, 2010. The three-day weekend event brought Native American visual artists, dancers, performers, crafts people and vendors, representing over 14 tribes from across the country, to Southwest Florida to promote Native American cultural heritage. Sponsored by the Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum in Big Cypress, the festival also includes alligator wrestling, traditional house building demonstrations, a children's craft corner, food vendors and performances by Martha Redbone, Hank Nelson, Jr. and Cowbone. The celebration continues on Sunday from 11 A.M. to 3:45 P.M.. Tristan Spinski/Staff

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  • Talon Duncan, 12, with Yellow Bird Apache Dancers, a Native American dance troupe from Mesa, Ariz., performs at the 13th Annual American Indian Arts Celebration at Big Cypress Seminole Indian Reservation on Saturday, Nov. 6, 2010. The three-day weekend event brought Native American visual artists, dancers, performers, crafts people and vendors, representing over 14 tribes from across the country, to Southwest Florida to promote Native American cultural heritage. Sponsored by the Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum in Big Cypress, the festival also includes alligator wrestling, traditional house building demonstrations, a children's craft corner, food vendors and performances by Martha Redbone, Hank Nelson, Jr. and Cowbone. The celebration continues on Sunday from 11 A.M. to 3:45 P.M.. Tristan Spinski/Staff
  • Doreen Duncan, left, with Yellow Bird Apache Dancers, a Native American dance troupe from Mesa, Ariz., holds hands with Carmela Sievers, right, 3, of Bonita Springs, during a group dance at the 13th Annual American Indian Arts Celebration at Big Cypress Seminole Indian Reservation on Saturday, Nov. 6, 2010. The three-day weekend event brought Native American visual artists, dancers, performers, crafts people and vendors, representing over 14 tribes from across the country, to Southwest Florida to promote Native American cultural heritage. Sponsored by the Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum in Big Cypress, the festival also includes alligator wrestling, traditional house building demonstrations, a children's craft corner, food vendors and performances by Martha Redbone, Hank Nelson, Jr. and Cowbone. The celebration continues on Sunday from 11 A.M. to 3:45 P.M.. Tristan Spinski/Staff
  • Jordan Osceola, left, 6, of Immokalee, and Dacia Osceola, 7, of Lehigh, play in a grove of cypress trees during the 13th Annual American Indian Arts Celebration at Big Cypress Seminole Indian Reservation on Saturday, Nov. 6, 2010. The three-day weekend event brought Native American visual artists, dancers, performers, crafts people and vendors, representing over 14 tribes from across the country, to Southwest Florida to promote Native American cultural heritage. Sponsored by the Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum in Big Cypress, the festival also includes alligator wrestling, traditional house building demonstrations, a children's craft corner, food vendors and performances by Martha Redbone, Hank Nelson, Jr. and Cowbone. The celebration continues on Sunday from 11 A.M. to 3:45 P.M.. Tristan Spinski/Staff
  • David Brush, with Yellow Bird Apache Dancers, a Native American dance troupe from Mesa, Ariz., prepares for his performance at the 13th Annual American Indian Arts Celebration at Big Cypress Seminole Indian Reservation on Saturday, Nov. 6, 2010. The three-day weekend event brought Native American visual artists, dancers, performers, crafts people and vendors, representing over 14 tribes from across the country, to Southwest Florida to promote Native American cultural heritage. Sponsored by the Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum in Big Cypress, the festival also includes alligator wrestling, traditional house building demonstrations, a children's craft corner, food vendors and performances by Martha Redbone, Hank Nelson, Jr. and Cowbone. The celebration continues on Sunday from 11 A.M. to 3:45 P.M.. Tristan Spinski/Staff
  • From left, Yeamah Isabell, 9, Ashley Peat, 10, and Taylor James, 9, all of Girl Scout Troop 10832 in Davie, Fla., pet an alligator during the 'critter show' at the 13th Annual American Indian Arts Celebration at Big Cypress Seminole Indian Reservation on Saturday, Nov. 6, 2010. The three-day weekend event brought Native American visual artists, dancers, performers, crafts people and vendors, representing over 14 tribes from across the country, to Southwest Florida to promote Native American cultural heritage. Sponsored by the Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum in Big Cypress, the festival also includes alligator wrestling, traditional house building demonstrations, a children's craft corner, food vendors and performances by Martha Redbone, Hank Nelson, Jr. and Cowbone. The celebration continues on Sunday from 11 A.M. to 3:45 P.M.. Tristan Spinski/Staff
  • Bradley Cooley, an artist from Tallahassee, works on a sculpture at the 13th Annual American Indian Arts Celebration at Big Cypress Seminole Indian Reservation on Saturday, Nov. 6, 2010. The three-day weekend event brought Native American visual artists, dancers, performers, crafts people and vendors, representing over 14 tribes from across the country, to Southwest Florida to promote Native American cultural heritage. Sponsored by the Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum in Big Cypress, the festival also includes alligator wrestling, traditional house building demonstrations, a children's craft corner, food vendors and performances by Martha Redbone, Hank Nelson, Jr. and Cowbone. The celebration continues on Sunday from 11 A.M. to 3:45 P.M.. Tristan Spinski/Staff
  • Sky Duncan, left, 14, and Talon Duncan, 12, brothers and performers with Yellow Bird Apache Dancers, a Native American dance troupe from Mesa, Ariz., prepare for their performance at the 13th Annual American Indian Arts Celebration at Big Cypress Seminole Indian Reservation on Saturday, Nov. 6, 2010. The three-day weekend event brought Native American visual artists, dancers, performers, crafts people and vendors, representing over 14 tribes from across the country, to Southwest Florida to promote Native American cultural heritage. Sponsored by the Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum in Big Cypress, the festival also includes alligator wrestling, traditional house building demonstrations, a children's craft corner, food vendors and performances by Martha Redbone, Hank Nelson, Jr. and Cowbone. The celebration continues on Sunday from 11 A.M. to 3:45 P.M.. Tristan Spinski/Staff

Artists, vendors, performers and visitors gathered over the weekend at Big Cypress Seminole Indian Reservation for the 13th Annual American Indian Arts Celebration

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