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Post September 11, are we safer?

See larger FILE - In this May 25, 2010 file photo, an Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agent walks down the aisle of charter jet for deportation in the air between Chicago and Harlingen, Texas. We are safer, but not safe enough. In the decade since the 9/11 attacks, the government has taken giant steps to protect the nation from terrorists, spending eye-popping sums to smarten up the federal bureaucracy, hunt down enemies, strengthen airline security, secure U.S. borders, reshape America's image and more. But the effort remains a work in progress, and in some cases a work stalled. The bipartisan 9/11 Commission in 2004 laid out a 585-page road map to create an America that is 'safer, stronger, wiser.' Many of the commission's recommendations are now reality. But in some cases, results haven't lived up to expectations. And other proposals still are just that, ideas awaiting action.   (AP Photo/LM Otero, File)

FILE - In this May 25, 2010 file photo, an Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agent walks down the aisle of charter jet for deportation in the air between Chicago and Harlingen, Texas. We are safer, but not safe enough. In the decade since the 9/11 attacks, the government has taken giant steps to protect the nation from terrorists, spending eye-popping sums to smarten up the federal bureaucracy, hunt down enemies, strengthen airline security, secure U.S. borders, reshape America's image and more. But the effort remains a work in progress, and in some cases a work stalled. The bipartisan 9/11 Commission in 2004 laid out a 585-page road map to create an America that is "safer, stronger, wiser." Many of the commission's recommendations are now reality. But in some cases, results haven't lived up to expectations. And other proposals still are just that, ideas awaiting action. (AP Photo/LM Otero, File)

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  • FILE - In this Aug. 3, 2011 file photo, airline passengers go through the Transportation Security Administration security checkpoint at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport in Atlanta. We are safer, but not safe enough. In the decade since the 9/11 attacks, the government has taken giant steps to protect the nation from terrorists, spending eye-popping sums to smarten up the federal bureaucracy, hunt down enemies, strengthen airline security, secure U.S. borders, reshape America's image and more. But the effort remains a work in progress, and in some cases a work stalled. The bipartisan 9/11 Commission in 2004 laid out a 585-page road map to create an America that is 'safer, stronger, wiser.' Many of the commission's recommendations are now reality. But in some cases, results haven't lived up to expectations. And other proposals still are just that, ideas awaiting action. (AP Photo/Erik S. Lesser, File)
  • FILE - In this Sept. 11, 2006 file photo, former 9/11 Commission Co-Chairmen Lee Hamilton, right, and Thomas Kean, participate in a luncheon forum at the National Press Club in Washington. We are safer, but not safe enough. In the decade since the 9/11 attacks, the government has taken giant steps to protect the nation from terrorists, spending eye-popping sums to smarten up the federal bureaucracy, hunt down enemies, strengthen airline security, secure U.S. borders, reshape America's image and more. But the effort remains a work in progress, and in some cases a work stalled. The bipartisan 9/11 Commission in 2004 laid out a 585-page road map to create an America that is 'safer, stronger, wiser.' Many of the commission's recommendations are now reality. But in some cases, results haven't lived up to expectations. And other proposals still are just that, ideas awaiting action.  (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)
  • FILE - In this June 11, 2002 file photo, the names of government agencies dealing with the fight on terrorism are displayed during a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington on federal reorganization to combat terrorism. We are safer, but not safe enough. In the decade since the 9/11 attacks, the government has taken giant steps to protect the nation from terrorists, spending eye-popping sums to smarten up the federal bureaucracy, hunt down enemies, strengthen airline security, secure U.S. borders, reshape America's image and more. But the effort remains a work in progress, and in some cases a work stalled. The bipartisan 9/11 Commission in 2004 laid out a 585-page road map to create an America that is 'safer, stronger, wiser.' Many of the commission's recommendations are now reality. But in some cases, results haven't lived up to expectations. And other proposals still are just that, ideas awaiting action.  (AP Photo/Kenneth Lambert, File)
  • FILE - In this May 25, 2010 file photo, an Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agent walks down the aisle of charter jet for deportation in the air between Chicago and Harlingen, Texas. We are safer, but not safe enough. In the decade since the 9/11 attacks, the government has taken giant steps to protect the nation from terrorists, spending eye-popping sums to smarten up the federal bureaucracy, hunt down enemies, strengthen airline security, secure U.S. borders, reshape America's image and more. But the effort remains a work in progress, and in some cases a work stalled. The bipartisan 9/11 Commission in 2004 laid out a 585-page road map to create an America that is 'safer, stronger, wiser.' Many of the commission's recommendations are now reality. But in some cases, results haven't lived up to expectations. And other proposals still are just that, ideas awaiting action.   (AP Photo/LM Otero, File)

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