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Sandy's devastation comes into sharp focus for residents

Volunteers help unload food from a truck for distribution to the residents of the Lower East Side who remain without power due to Superstorm Sandy, Friday, Nov. 2, 2012, in New York.  In Manhattan, where 226,000 buildings, homes and business remain without power, Consolidated Edison says they should have service restored by Saturday.  (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)

Volunteers help unload food from a truck for distribution to the residents of the Lower East Side who remain without power due to Superstorm Sandy, Friday, Nov. 2, 2012, in New York. In Manhattan, where 226,000 buildings, homes and business remain without power, Consolidated Edison says they should have service restored by Saturday. (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)

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  • New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie tries to comfort Alice Cimillo and other Moonachie, N.J. residents whose homes were damaged by Superstorm Sandy, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012, during a tour of the flood-ravaged area. The flooding of Moonachie, Little Ferry and Carlstadt, three communities sandwiched between Teterboro Airport, MetLife Stadium and the Hackensack River, was caused by six dirt berms that broke from the pressure of a tidal surge, Christie said. More than 1.7 million customers in New Jersey remain without power _ down from over 2.7 million at the height of the outages. (AP Photo/The Record of Bergen County, Kevin R. Wexler, Pool)
  • In this aerial photo, burnt homes smolder along several blocks near Route 36 in Seaside Heights, N.J., Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012. The photo was taken during a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration flight to document coastal changes by the after Superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
  • Dave Skudin empties his home of household items that were destroyed by flooding from Superstorm Sandy on Thursday,Nov 1, 2012, in Long Beach, N.Y. Three days after Sandy slammed the mid-Atlantic and the Northeast, New York and New Jersey struggled to get back on their feet, the U.S. death toll climbed to more than 80, and more than 4.6 million homes and businesses were still without power. (AP Photo/Kathy Kmonicek)
  • A passenger is turned away from an overcrowded bus intended to help ferry commuters as subway systems below 34th Street remain offline due to Superstorm Sandy, Friday, Nov. 2, 2012, in New York.  In Manhattan, where 226,000 buildings, homes and business remain without power, Consolidated Edison says they should have service restored by Saturday.  (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)
  • Senior Rabbi Hershel Okonov, center and his sons Rabbi Dovid Okonov, right, and Rabbi Avremel Okonov, left, roll a water-damaged Torah, one of six damaged in floods from superstorm Sandy, on Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012,  at the Friends of Refugees of Eastern Europe (FREE) of Brighton Beach synagogue and community center in the Brooklyn borough of New York. A school at the center was flooded leaving 140 students from grades 1- 6 their school and Rabbi Avremel, its director, scrambling to find a location.  (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
  • Grace Chow, 22, of New York, pours water from one bucket to another  for a resident on the twentieth floor at Confucius Plaza in the Chinatown neighborhood of New York, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012. In the wake of Superstorm Sandy, power outages have also meant loss of water for some buildings. Chow and Matthew Hom, 26, also of New York, are volunteering for the New York United Dragon and Lion Dance group. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
  • People line up at a gas station waiting to fill up, Friday, Nov. 2, 2012, in Newark, N.J. In parts of New York and New Jersey, drivers lined up early Friday for hours at gas stations that were struggling to stay supplied. The power outages and flooding caused by Superstorm Sandy have forced many gas stations to close and disrupted the flow of fuel from refineries to those stations that are open. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
  • Tricia Burke walks over debris which washed up onto her property in the wake of superstorm Sandy, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012, in Brick, N.J. Three days after Sandy slammed the mid-Atlantic and the Northeast, New York and New Jersey struggled to get back on their feet, the U.S. death toll climbed to more than 80, and more than 4.6 million homes and businesses were still without power. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
  • In this aerial photo, sand covers the roads where several homes were destroyed or severely damaged by Superstorm Sandy in an area of Seaside Heights, N.J., Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012. The photo was taken during a flight to document coastal changes by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration after the storm moved through the area. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
  • Police officers wearing wet suits leave a site where the body of a 2-year-old child killed during Superstorm Sandy was discovered in Staten Island, New York, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012. Brandon Moore, 2, and Connor Moore, 4, were swiped into swirling waters as their mother tried to escape her SUV on Monday amid rushing waters that caused the vehicle to stall during Superstorm Sandy.  Police said the mother, Glenda Moore, was going to her sister's home in Brooklyn when she tried to flee the vehicle with the boys, only to have the force of the rising water and the relentless cadence of pounding waves rip the boy's small arms from her.  (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
  • Tunisia Wragg, a staff member with New York Assemblyman Sheldon Silver, checks a cell phone at a charging station that the assemblyman's office brought to Confucius Plaza in the Chinatown neighborhood of New York, N.Y., Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012, in the wake of superstorm Sandy. Hundreds of thousands in New York City alone were still without power Thursday, especially in Lower Manhattan, which remained in the dark roughly south of the Empire State Building after floodwaters had knocked out power. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
  • Rabbi Avremel Okonov of the Friends of Refugees of Eastern Europe (FREE) of Brighton Beach synagogue and community center, survey water damage in the center's school library on Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. Earlier Rabbi Okonov tried to rescue six water-damaged Torahs in floods from Superstorm Sandy, as well as a seeking temporary location for 140 students from grades 1- 6 who lost their school to flooding. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
  • Margaret and Duncan Fraser empty out their home of all the household items that were destroyed by flooding from Superstorm Sandy on Thursday, Nov 1, 2012, in Long Beach, N.Y. Three days after Sandy slammed the mid-Atlantic and the Northeast, New York and New Jersey struggled to get back on their feet, the U.S. death toll climbed to more than 80, and more than 4.6 million homes and businesses were still without power. (AP Photo/Kathy Kmonicek)
  • A queue of people forms behind a fence as they wait for distribution of food, water, and other supplies intended for residents of the Lower East Side who remain without power due to Superstorm Sandy, Friday, Nov. 2, 2012, in New York. In Manhattan, where 226,000 buildings, homes and business remain without power, Consolidated Edison says they should have service restored by Saturday.  (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)
  • Commuters board a New Jersey Transit train early Friday, Nov. 2, 2012, at the Trenton train station in Trenton, N.J.  After Monday's storm surge from superstorm Sandy knocked out power and flooded much of the region, trains are beginning to run on NJ Transit's Northeast Corridor between Trenton and New York City. Plans to resume North Jersey Coast and Raritan and Main line service were scrapped after a backup generator failed. Gov. Chris Christie on Thursday announced the federal government will be providing rail cars to help NJ Transit get train service up and running. The governor said 25 percent of the system's rail cars were in yards that flooded. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
  • A shopkeeper assists a customer to buy dog food with a flashlight in a darkened Sheen Brothers corner store that remains without power due to Superstorm Sandy, Friday, Nov. 2, 2012, in New York. In Manhattan, where 226,000 buildings, homes and business remain without power, Consolidated Edison says they should have service restored by Saturday.  (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)
  • Volunteers help unload food from a truck for distribution to the residents of the Lower East Side who remain without power due to Superstorm Sandy, Friday, Nov. 2, 2012, in New York.  In Manhattan, where 226,000 buildings, homes and business remain without power, Consolidated Edison says they should have service restored by Saturday.  (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)
  • Theresa Berzner rescues family photo albums that were amongst the household items flooded by Superstorm Sandy at her home on Thursday, Nov 1, 2012, in Long Beach, N.Y. Three days after Sandy slammed the mid-Atlantic and the Northeast, New York and New Jersey struggled to get back on their feet, the U.S. death toll climbed to more than 80, and more than 4.6 million homes and businesses were still without power. (AP Photo/Kathy Kmonicek)
  • Singh Tarlok, left, hands a bowl of hot food to Arnell Franklin at a food line run by community volunteers in the oceanside community of Far Rockaway in the Queens borough of New York on Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012. The area was devastated by superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
  • CORRECTS LOCATION - This aerial photo shows a new break in the island across Route 35 at the Herbert Street bridge in Mantoloking, N.J. in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012. The photo was taken during a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration flight to document coastal changes  after the storm moved through the area. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
  • Beth Skudin, right, hugs a neighbor outside her home that was flooded by Superstorm Sandy, Thursday, Nov 1, 2012, in Long Beach, N.Y.  Skudin was rescued by jetski from the window of her home on the night of the storm. Three days after Sandy slammed the mid-Atlantic and the Northeast, New York and New Jersey struggled to get back on their feet, the U.S. death toll climbed to more than 80, and more than 4.6 million homes and businesses were still without power.  (AP Photo/Kathy Kmonicek)
  • A girl plays on a fallen tree on Brighton 6th Street in the Brighton Beach area of Brooklyn in New York on Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
  • Kathleen Seemar, left, and her 13-year-old son, Andrew Seemar, clean up their home after it was flooded during superstorm Sandy, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012, in Brick, N.J. Three days after Sandy slammed the mid-Atlantic and the Northeast, New York and New Jersey struggled to get back on their feet, the U.S. death toll climbed to more than 80, and more than 4.6 million homes and businesses were still without power.  (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
  • Phillip Nguyen emerges from his basement, flooded from superstorm Sandy, with a stack of wet books to join discarded items on the sidewalk in the Brighton Beach area of Brooklyn in New York on Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
  • Sue Wondsel hugs family friend Rob Schreiber on the grounds of the fishing station she owns with her husband on Thursday, Nov 1, 2012, in Point Lookout, N.Y. Wondsel's business was wiped out by the powerful winds of Superstorm Sandy tearing up docks and flooding their building. (AP Photo/Kathy Kmonicek)
  • Don Durando stands outside his home on New York Avenue in Long Beach, N.Y. on Thursday, Nov 1, 2012. Superstorm Sandy flooded his home and destroyed much of his belongings. Three days after Sandy slammed the mid-Atlantic and the Northeast, New York and New Jersey struggled to get back on their feet, the U.S. death toll climbed to more than 80, and more than 4.6 million homes and businesses were still without power. (AP Photo/Kathy Kmonicek)
  • Kyle Kostesich removes the flooring from one bedroom of his Grand Street condo as he begins the cleanup process after the floodwaters from Superstorm Sandy receded, Thursday Nov. 1, 2012 in Hoboken, N.J. (AP Photo/Joe Epstein)
  • Shortly before the gas ran out, customers wait in line at a Hess station where the line of cars snaked 10 blocks, and at least 60 people waited to fill red gas cans for their generators, in the Gowanus section of  Brooklyn, New York  Friday morning, Oct 2, 2012. Courier Winston Alfred said he had been there in his van since 4:20 am, and was second in line, when he was turned away four hours later. (AP Photo/David Caruso)
  • Grace Chow, 22, of New York, carries a large bucket of water on a twenty floor trip to help an older resident at Confucius Plaza in the Chinatown neighborhood of New York, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012. In the wake of Superstorm Sandy, power outages have also meant loss of water for some buildings. Chow was volunteering with the New York United Dragon and Lion Dance group. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
  • Glenda Moore, and her husband, Damian Moore, react as they approach the scene where at least one of their childrens' bodies were discovered in Staten Island, New York, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012. Brandon Moore, 2, and Connor Moore, 4, were swiped into swirling waters as their mother tried to escape her SUV on Monday amid rushing waters that caused the vehicle to stall during Superstorm Sandy.  Police said the mother, Glenda Moore, was going to her sister's home in Brooklyn when she tried to flee the vehicle with the boys, only to have the force of the rising water and the relentless cadence of pounding waves rip the boy's small arms from her.  (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
  • Debris and destroyed homes line streets in Long Beach, N.Y. Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012. Three days after Sandy slammed the mid-Atlantic and the Northeast, New York and New Jersey struggled to get back on their feet, the U.S. death toll climbed to more than 80, and more than 4.6 million homes and businesses were still without power. (AP Photo/Kathy Kmonicek)
  • This image, right, taken from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association's Hurricane Sandy Response Imagery Viewer shows an aerial view of a section of Seaside Heights, N.J. that was impacted by the deadly storm. At left is the before view provided by Google Earth. NOAA is documenting coastal changes after Superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/NOAA)
  • Much of lower Manhattan remains dark, as viewed from the darkened Manhattan side of the pedestrian walkway of the Brooklyn Bridge, Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012 in New York. In the wake of superstorm Sandy, power outages still plague much of the New York area. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
  • Mohammad Ullah fills up his gypsy cab from a gas container while others wait on a line in the Brooklyn borough of New York, Friday, Nov. 2, 2012.   In parts of New York and New Jersey, drivers face another day of lining up for hours at gas stations struggling to stay supplied.  Superstorm Sandy damaged ports that accept fuel tankers and flooded underground equipment that sends fuel through pipelines. Without power, fuel terminals can't pump gasoline onto tanker trucks, and gas stations can't pump fuel into customers' cars.  (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
  • In this aerial photo, debris from an amusement park destroyed during Superstorm Sandy lines the beach in Seaside Heights, N.J. Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012.  The photo was taken during a flight to document coastal changes by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration after the storm moved through the area. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
  • Annmarie Pansini, center, cries as New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, right, speaks to her husband, Michael Pansini, during a tour of flood-ravaged Moonachie, N.J. Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012.  The flooding of Moonachie, Little Ferry and Carlstadt, three communities sandwiched between Teterboro Airport, MetLife Stadium and the Hackensack River, was caused by six dirt berms that broke from the pressure of a tidal surge, Christie said. More than 1.7 million customers in New Jersey remain without power _ down from over 2.7 million at the height of the outages. (AP Photo/The Record of Bergen County, Kevin R. Wexler, Pool)
  • Debris covers the lower floor of Don Durando's house in Long Beach, N.Y. Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012, after sustaining flooding and other damage from Superstorm Sandy. Three days after Sandy slammed the mid-Atlantic and the Northeast, New York and New Jersey struggled to get back on their feet, the U.S. death toll climbed to more than 80, and more than 4.6 million homes and businesses were still without power. (AP Photo/Kathy Kmonicek)

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