Photo Galleries »

U.S. Embassies under protest and attack in Middle East

Yemeni protestors climb the gate of the U.S. Embassy during a protest about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Sanaa, Yemen, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012. Dozens of protesters gather in front of the US Embassy in Sanaa to protest against the American film 'The Innocence of Muslims' deemed blasphemous and Islamophobic. (AP Photo/Hani Mohammed)

Yemeni protestors climb the gate of the U.S. Embassy during a protest about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Sanaa, Yemen, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012. Dozens of protesters gather in front of the US Embassy in Sanaa to protest against the American film "The Innocence of Muslims" deemed blasphemous and Islamophobic. (AP Photo/Hani Mohammed)

Photo Rating:
Gallery Rating:

  • An Egyptian protester throws back a tear gas canister toward riot police, unseen, during clashes outside the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012. Protesters clash with police near the U.S. Embassy in Cairo for the third day in a row. Police used tear gas to disperse the demonstrators and the two sides pelted each other with rocks. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)
  • FILE - In this Monday, April 11, 2011 file photo, U.S. envoy Chris Stevens stands in the lobby of the Tibesty Hotel where an African Union delegation was meeting with opposition leaders in Benghazi, Libya. Libyan officials say the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans have been killed in an attack on the U.S. consulate in the eastern city of Benghazi by protesters angry over a film that ridiculed Islam's Prophet Muhammad. The officials say Ambassador Chris Stevens was killed Tuesday night when he and a group of embassy employees went to the consulate to try to evacuate staff. The protesters were firing gunshots and rocket propelled grenades.(AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
  • Protesters chant slogans amid orange smoke outside the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2012. Egyptian protesters, largely ultra conservative Islamists, have climbed the walls of the U.S. embassy in Cairo, went into the courtyard and brought down the flag, replacing it with a black flag with Islamic inscription, in protest of a film deemed offensive of Islam. (AP Photo/Mohammed Abu Zaid)
  • An Egyptian protester stands in front of riot police during clashes outside the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012. Protesters clash with police near the U.S. Embassy in Cairo for the third day in a row. Police used tear gas to disperse the demonstrators and the two sides pelted each other with rocks.  (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)
  • Yemeni protestors climb the gate of the U.S. Embassy during a protest about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Sanaa, Yemen, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012. Dozens of protesters gather in front of the US Embassy in Sanaa to protest against the American film 'The Innocence of Muslims' deemed blasphemous and Islamophobic. (AP Photo/Hani Mohammed)
  • A riot policeman passes burning vehicles during clashes outside the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt, early Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. (AP Photo/Hussein Tallal)
  • An Egyptian protester holds tear gas canisters fired during clashes between Egyptian police and protesters in front of the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt ,Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.(AP Photo/Ahmed Gomaa)
  • An Indian man holds a placard and shouts slogans during a protest in front of the U.S. embassy in Chennai, India, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012. The protest was held against an obscure movie made in the United States called 'Innocence of Muslims' that mocked Islam's Prophet Muhammad. (AP Photo/Arun Sankar K.)
  • Tunisian protestors burn a U.S. flag during a protest about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, near the U.S. Embassy in Tunis, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. About 50 protesters burned American flags outside the U.S. Embassy in Tunisia's capital as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. (AP Photo/Hassene Dridi)
  • Yemenis protest in front of the U.S. Embassy about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Sanaa, Yemen, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012. Dozens of protesters gather in front of the US Embassy in Sanaa to protest against the American film 'The Innocence of Muslims' deemed blasphemous and Islamophobic. (AP Photo/Hani Mohammed)
  • A Yemeni protester, center, destroys an American flag pulled down as other hold a banner in Arabic that reads, 'any one but you God's prophet' at the U.S. Embassy compound during a protest about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Sanaa, Yemen, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012. Dozens of protesters gather in front of the US Embassy in Sanaa to protest against the American film 'The Innocence of Muslims' deemed blasphemous and Islamophobic. (AP Photo/Hani Mohammed)
  • Protesters clash with police in front of the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt, early Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.(AP Photo/Mohammed Abu Zaid)
  • Egyptian protesters chant anti-U.S. slogans during a demonstration in front of the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012 as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.(AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)
  • Protesters run through tear gas as they clash with police in front of the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt, early Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.(AP Photo/Mohammed Abu Zaid)
  • CORRECTS NATIONALITY OF FILMMAKER - Egyptian soldiers stand guard in front of the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. A man identifying himself as Sam Bacile, a 56-year-old California real estate developer, said he wrote, produced and directed the movie. He told the AP he was an Israeli Jew and an American citizen. But Israeli officials said they had not heard of Bacile and there was no record of him being a citizen. Arabic on the wall reads, 'anyone but God's prophet.' (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)
  • Yemeni protestors break a door of the U.S. Embassy during a protest about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Sanaa, Yemen, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012. Dozens of protesters gather in front of the US Embassy in Sanaa to protest against the American film 'The Innocence of Muslims' deemed blasphemous and Islamophobic. (AP Photo/Hani Mohammed)
  • A riot policeman passes burning vehicles during clashes outside the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt, early Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. (AP Photo/Hussein Tallal)
  • Yemeni protesters break a window of the U.S. Embassy during a protest about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Sanaa, Yemen, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012. Dozens of protesters gather in front of the US Embassy in Sanaa to protest against the American film 'The Innocence of Muslims' deemed blasphemous and Islamophobic. (AP Photo/Hani Mohammed)
  • Followers of Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr, seen in the poster at, center, chant anti-U.S. slogans and hold the Iraqi flag stepping over the U.S. flag during a demonstration as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Baghdad, Iraq, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012. Hundreds of followers of the anti-American Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr demanded the closure of the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad because of the film. (AP Photo/Karim Kadim)
  • Protesters clash with police in front of the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt, early Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.(AP Photo/Mohammed Abu Zaid)
  • FILE - In this Monday, April 11, 2011 file photo, U.S. envoy Chris Stevens, center, accompanied by British envoy Christopher Prentice, left, speaks to Council member for Misrata Dr. Suleiman Fortia, right, at the Tibesty Hotel where an African Union delegation was meeting with opposition leaders in Benghazi, Libya. Libyan officials say the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans have been killed in an attack on the U.S. consulate in the eastern city of Benghazi by protesters angry over a film that ridiculed Islam's Prophet Muhammad. The officials say Ambassador Chris Stevens was killed Tuesday night when he and a group of embassy employees went to the consulate to try to evacuate staff. The protesters were firing gunshots and rocket propelled grenades. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
  • Followers of Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr, seen in the frame at center, chant anti-U.S. slogans during a demonstration as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Baghdad, Iraq, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012. Hundreds of followers of the anti-American Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr demanded the closure of the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad because of the film. (AP Photo/Karim Kadim)
  • Followers of Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr burn the U.S. flag during a demonstration as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in Baghdad, Iraq, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012. Hundreds of followers of the anti-American Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr demanded the closure of the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad because of the film. (AP Photo/Karim Kadim)
  • Iranian protestors chant slogans during a demonstration against a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in front of Swiss Embassy in Tehran, which represents US interests in Iran, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012. About 50 protesters gathered in Tehran outside the Swiss Embassy, which looks after U.S. diplomatic interests in Iran, shouting ''Death to America'' and condemning the film. The embassy is heavily guarded by Iranian riot police and there are no reports of violence. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)
  • Egyptian protesters clash with riot police, unseen, outside the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012. Tens were injured in clashes in front of the U.S. embassy in Cairo, the state TV reported on Thursday, quoting Egypt's Health Ministry. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)
  • Egyptian protesters throw stones at a riot police armored vehicle during clashes outside the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012. Protesters clash with police near the U.S. Embassy in Cairo for the third day in a row. Police used tear gas to disperse the demonstrators and the two sides pelted each other with rocks. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)
  • An Egyptian riot police officer shoots a tear gas canister toward protesters during clashes outside the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012. Protesters clash with police near the U.S. Embassy in Cairo for the third day in a row. Police used tear gas to disperse the demonstrators and the two sides pelted each other with rocks.  (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)
  • A protester sets a tire on fire during clashes with police in front of the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt, early Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.(AP Photo/Mohammed Abu Zaid)
  • Egyptian protesters attend Muslims evening prayers during a demonstration in front of the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. Arabic graffiti on the wall reads 'there is one God, we will live with dignity,' and 'anyone but God's prophet.' (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)
  • Egyptian protesters carry anti U.S. banners while they lineup by the walls of the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. Arabic on the center banner reads 'the United Nations ignore the killing of Muslims, nuclear weapons, internet and media channels are used to kill the principles and ethics, leadership is not about the numbers of bombs and soldiers or supporting Israel with no religious word.' (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)
  • Egyptian protesters burn tires as they clash with riot police, unseen, outside the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt, early Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad. (AP Photo/Hussein Tallal)

Related Stories for U.S. Embassies under protest and attack in Middle…

Comments on this photo » 0

Be the first to post a comment!

Share your thoughts

Comments are the sole responsibility of the person posting them. You agree not to post comments that are off topic, defamatory, obscene, abusive, threatening or an invasion of privacy. Violators may be banned. Click here for our full user agreement.

Comments can be shared on Facebook and Yahoo!. Add both options by connecting your profiles.

Features