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Recording frog sounds

A cane toad is seen outside Becky Speer's house Sept. 19, 2012, in the Naples area. Frog volunteers went out recording information on populations of the various webbed amphibians in the region. Corey Perrine/Staff

Photo by COREY PERRINE, Naples Daily News

A cane toad is seen outside Becky Speer's house Sept. 19, 2012, in the Naples area. Frog volunteers went out recording information on populations of the various webbed amphibians in the region. Corey Perrine/Staff

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  • Corey Perrine/Staff 
 Becky Speer is seen driving to her next location to document frog sounds Sept. 19, 2012, in the Naples area. Frog volunteers went out recording information on populations of the various webbed amphibians in the region. Speer and Hauch spent three hours on their route stopping for three minutes recording sounds and spotting specimen three minutes at a time. "Tracking these populations are important because they (frogs) are the first indicators of the environment and what's going wrong," Speer said.
  • Corey Perrine/Staff 
 Standing perfectly still for three minutes, Naturalist Becky Speer listens for frog sounds adorned with a mosquito net Sept. 19, 2012, in Naples. Frog volunteers went out recording information on populations of the various webbed amphibians in the region. Speer and Hauch spent three hours on their route stopping for three minutes recording sounds and spotting specimen three minutes at a time. "Tracking these populations are important because they (frogs) are the first indicators of the environment and what's going wrong," Speer said.
  • Corey Perrine/Staff 
 Heidi Hauch records data on sounds recorded Sept. 19, 2012 at Rookery Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve east of Naples. Frog volunteers went out recording information on populations of the various webbed amphibians in the region. Speer and Hauch spent three hours on their route stopping for three minutes recording sounds and spotting specimen three minutes at a time. "Tracking these populations are important because they (frogs) are the first indicators of the environment and what's going wrong," Speer said.
  • A cane toad is seen outside Becky Speer's house Sept. 19, 2012, in the Naples area. Frog volunteers went out recording information on populations of the various webbed amphibians in the region. Corey Perrine/Staff
  • Corey Perrine/Staff
A statue is seen in Speer's home Sept. 19, 2012 in Naples, Fla. Frog volunteers went out recording information on populations of the various webbed amphibians in the region. Speer and Hauch spent three hours on their route stopping for three minutes recording sounds and spotting specimen three minutes at a time. 'Tracking these populations are important because they (frogs) are the first indicators of the environment and what's going wrong,' Speer said.
  • Corey Perrine/Staff
Heidi Hauch spots a tree frog with Becky Speer inside a portable toilet at Madison Park subdivision Sept. 19, 2012 in Naples, Fla. Frog volunteers went out recording information on populations of the various webbed amphibians in the region. Speer and Hauch spent three hours on their route stopping for three minutes recording sounds and spotting specimen three minutes at a time. 'Tracking these populations are important because they (frogs) are the first indicators of the environment and what's going wrong,' Speer said.
  • Corey Perrine/Staff
Becky Speer listens for frog sounds at Madison Park subdivision Sept. 19, 2012 in Naples, Fla. Frog volunteers went out recording information on populations of the various webbed amphibians in the region. Speer and Hauch spent three hours on their route stopping for three minutes recording sounds and spotting specimen three minutes at a time. 'Tracking these populations are important because they (frogs) are the first indicators of the environment and what's going wrong,' Speer said.
  • Corey Perrine/Staff
Becky Speer listens for sounds at Madison Park subdivision Sept. 19, 2012 at 12 locations in the Naples area. Frog volunteers went out recording information on populations of the various webbed amphibians in the region. Speer and Hauch spent three hours on their route stopping for three minutes recording sounds and spotting specimen three minutes at a time. 'Tracking these populations are important because they (frogs) are the first indicators of the environment and what's going wrong,' Speer said.
  • Corey Perrine/Staff
Becky Speer, right, explains species of toads and frogs with Heidi Hauch Sept. 19, 2012 at Speer's home in Naples, Fla. Frog volunteers went out recording information on populations of the various webbed amphibians in the region. Speer and Hauch spent three hours on their route stopping for three minutes recording sounds and spotting specimen three minutes at a time. 'Tracking these populations are important because they (frogs) are the first indicators of the environment and what's going wrong,' Speer said.

Frog volunteers went out recording information on populations of the various webbed amphibians in the region.

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