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Pilot whales stranded in Everglades National Park

See larger Corey Perrine/Staff
Officials from Florida Fish and Wildlife and NOAA work to deter a pod of Pilot Whales from beaching themselves in Everglades National Park.  So far, 10 whales have died with four of them being euthanized.

Photo by COREY PERRINE

Corey Perrine/Staff Officials from Florida Fish and Wildlife and NOAA work to deter a pod of Pilot Whales from beaching themselves in Everglades National Park. So far, 10 whales have died with four of them being euthanized.

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  • Naples Daily News Photo
NOAA biologists report that 46 pilot whales are alive and swimming free off Highland Beach, where six dead whales are beached.
That is more live whales than had been found Tuesday, said NOAA marina mammal stranding coordinator Blair Mase Guthrie.
Pilot whales, which form tight-knit social structures, are the most common whale species for mass strandings in Florida, she said.
'When one is sick or in distress, the other ones typically will stay close by,' she said.
Biologists are uncertain how long the whales have been stranded, and even the live whales likely are malnourished, she said.
Veterinarians are considering options to remove the dead whales to encourage the live whales to return to their home ranges in deep waters offshore.
The live whales likely are malnourished and some might have to be euthanized to shorten their suffering, Mase Guthrie said.
'The outcome is very uncertain for the live whales,' she said.
  • Naples Daily News Photo
NOAA biologists report that 46 pilot whales are alive and swimming free off Highland Beach, where six dead whales are beached.
That is more live whales than had been found Tuesday, said NOAA marina mammal stranding coordinator Blair Mase Guthrie.
Pilot whales, which form tight-knit social structures, are the most common whale species for mass strandings in Florida, she said.
'When one is sick or in distress, the other ones typically will stay close by,' she said.
Biologists are uncertain how long the whales have been stranded, and even the live whales likely are malnourished, she said.
Veterinarians are considering options to remove the dead whales to encourage the live whales to return to their home ranges in deep waters offshore.
The live whales likely are malnourished and some might have to be euthanized to shorten their suffering, Mase Guthrie said.
'The outcome is very uncertain for the live whales,' she said.
  • Naples Daily News Photo
NOAA biologists report that 46 pilot whales are alive and swimming free off Highland Beach, where six dead whales are beached.
That is more live whales than had been found Tuesday, said NOAA marina mammal stranding coordinator Blair Mase Guthrie.
Pilot whales, which form tight-knit social structures, are the most common whale species for mass strandings in Florida, she said.
'When one is sick or in distress, the other ones typically will stay close by,' she said.
Biologists are uncertain how long the whales have been stranded, and even the live whales likely are malnourished, she said.
Veterinarians are considering options to remove the dead whales to encourage the live whales to return to their home ranges in deep waters offshore.
The live whales likely are malnourished and some might have to be euthanized to shorten their suffering, Mase Guthrie said.
'The outcome is very uncertain for the live whales,' she said.
  • Naples Daily News Photo
NOAA biologists report that 46 pilot whales are alive and swimming free off Highland Beach, where six dead whales are beached.
That is more live whales than had been found Tuesday, said NOAA marina mammal stranding coordinator Blair Mase Guthrie.
Pilot whales, which form tight-knit social structures, are the most common whale species for mass strandings in Florida, she said.
'When one is sick or in distress, the other ones typically will stay close by,' she said.
Biologists are uncertain how long the whales have been stranded, and even the live whales likely are malnourished, she said.
Veterinarians are considering options to remove the dead whales to encourage the live whales to return to their home ranges in deep waters offshore.
The live whales likely are malnourished and some might have to be euthanized to shorten their suffering, Mase Guthrie said.
'The outcome is very uncertain for the live whales,' she said.
  • Photo
  • In this Tuesday, Dec. 3, 2013 photo provided by the National Park Service, pilot whales are positioned in shallow waters just off a beach in a remote area of the western portion of Everglades National Park, Fla. Federal officials said some whales have died. The marine mammals are known to normally inhabit deep water. (AP Photo/National Park Service)
  • Photo
  • Photo
  • Video screen shots courtesy WSVN-7
A pod of approximately 40 Pilot Whales are swimming dangerously close to the shoreline in the Everglades National Park Wednesday with at least four beaching themselves and perishing.  There is a rescue effort underway to turn the whales around and into deeper water.
  • Video screen shots courtesy WSVN-7
A pod of approximately 40 Pilot Whales are swimming dangerously close to the shoreline in the Everglades National Park Wednesday with at least four beaching themselves and perishing.  There is a rescue effort underway to turn the whales around and into deeper water.
  • Corey Perrine/Staff
Officials from Florida Fish and Wildlife and NOAA work to deter a pod of Pilot Whales from beaching themselves in Everglades National Park.  So far, 10 whales have died with four of them being euthanized.
  • Corey Perrine/Staff
Officials from Florida Fish and Wildlife and NOAA work to deter a pod of Pilot Whales from beaching themselves in Everglades National Park.  So far, 10 whales have died with four of them being euthanized.
  • Corey Perrine/Staff
Officials from Florida Fish and Wildlife and NOAA work to deter a pod of Pilot Whales from beaching themselves in Everglades National Park.  So far, 10 whales have died with four of them being euthanized.
  • Corey Perrine/Staff
Officials from Florida Fish and Wildlife and NOAA work to deter a pod of Pilot Whales from beaching themselves in Everglades National Park.  So far, 10 whales have died with four of them being euthanized.

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