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Dolphin Research Center

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In this Monday, Dec. 2, 2013 photo, a dolphin named Molly, who is in her early 50's is given water through a tube by a trainer at the Dolphin Research Center in the Florida Keys, Fla. Geriatric marine mammal care is becoming more important today as Molly and other dolphins in human care are living longer than their counterparts in the wild. To meet these growing needs, the center has established the College of Marine Mammal Professionals. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)

In this Monday, Dec. 2, 2013 photo, a dolphin named Molly, who is in her early 50's is given water through a tube by a trainer at the Dolphin Research Center in the Florida Keys, Fla. Geriatric marine mammal care is becoming more important today as Molly and other dolphins in human care are living longer than their counterparts in the wild. To meet these growing needs, the center has established the College of Marine Mammal Professionals. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)

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  • In this Monday, Dec. 2, 2013 photo, a dolphin named Molly, who is in her early 50's is given water through a tube by a trainer at the Dolphin Research Center in the Florida Keys, Fla. Geriatric marine mammal care is becoming more important today as Molly and other dolphins in human care are living longer than their counterparts in the wild. To meet these growing needs, the center has established the College of Marine Mammal Professionals. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
  • In this Monday, Dec. 2, 2013 photo, Karen, a blind and aging sea lion, responds to a command during a training session at the Dolphin Research Center in the Florida Keys, Fla. Geriatric marine mammal care is becoming more important today as marine mammals under human care are living longer than their counterparts in the wild. To meet these growing needs, the center has established the College of Marine Mammal Professionals. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
  • In this Monday, Dec. 2, 2013 photo, senior trainer Kelly Jayne Rodriguez, left, works with a dolphin named Molly, who is in her early 50's, as students look on at the Dolphin Research Center in the Florida Keys, Fla. Geriatric marine mammal care is becoming more important today as Molly and other dolphins in human care are living longer than their counterparts in the wild. To meet these growing needs, the center has established the College of Marine Mammal Professionals. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
  • In this Monday, Dec. 2, 2013 photo, Karen, a blind and aging sea lion, follows senior trainer Kelly Jayne Rodriguez for a training session at the Dolphin Research Center in the Florida Keys, Fla. Geriatric marine mammal care is becoming more important today as marine mammals under human care are living longer than their counterparts in the wild. To meet these growing needs, the center has established the College of Marine Mammal Professionals. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
  • In this Monday, Dec. 2, 2013 photo, Kirsten Donald, education director at the Dolphin Research Center, teaches a class at the center in the Florida Keys, Fla. Geriatric marine mammal care is becoming more important today as marine mammals under human care are living longer than their counterparts in the wild. To meet these growing needs, the center has established the College of Marine Mammal Professionals. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
  • In this Monday, Dec. 2, 2013 photo, a dolphin named Molly, who is in her early 50's, leaps out of the water while working with trainers at the Dolphin Research Center in the Florida Keys, Fla. Geriatric marine mammal care is becoming more important today as Molly and other dolphins in human care are living longer than their counterparts in the wild. To meet these growing needs, the center has established the College of Marine Mammal Professionals. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
  • In this Monday, Dec. 2, 2013 photo, students with the College of Marine Mammal Professions place their hands on Karen, a blind and aging sea lion, during a training session at the Dolphin Research Center in the Florida Keys, Fla. Geriatric marine mammal care is becoming more important today as marine mammals under human care are living longer than their counterparts in the wild. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
  • In this Monday, Dec. 2, 2013 photo, students with the College of Marine Mammal Professions watch a dolphin named Molly, who is in her early 50's, swim during a training session at the Dolphin Research Center in the Florida Keys, Fla. Geriatric marine mammal care is becoming more important today as Molly and other dolphins in human care are living longer than their counterparts in the wild. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
  • In this Monday, Dec. 2, 2013 photo, senior trainer Kelly Jayne Rodriguez gives a kiss to Karen, a blind and aging sea lion, during a training session at the Dolphin Research Center in the Florida Keys, Fla. Geriatric marine mammal care is becoming more important today as marine mammals under human care are living longer than their counterparts in the wild. To meet these growing needs, the center has established the College of Marine Mammal Professionals. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)

The Dolphin Research Center is located in the Florida Keys.

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