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Naples teen recovers from spinal injury

David Albers/Staff
- Naples resident Reynold Lamour visits with his son, 18-year-old Reggie Lamour, as he arrives home from five months of treatment for a spinal cord injury on Thursday, June 20, 2013.  After suffering the injury in January which left Lamour paralyzed, he became a candidate for the Broward Children's Center's Center for Innovative Technology program to receive a diaphragmatic pacing system.  The DPS device replaces a ventilator for quadriplegic patients by stimulating diaphragm muscles to stimulate breathing.

Photo by DAVID ALBERS

David Albers/Staff - Naples resident Reynold Lamour visits with his son, 18-year-old Reggie Lamour, as he arrives home from five months of treatment for a spinal cord injury on Thursday, June 20, 2013. After suffering the injury in January which left Lamour paralyzed, he became a candidate for the Broward Children's Center's Center for Innovative Technology program to receive a diaphragmatic pacing system. The DPS device replaces a ventilator for quadriplegic patients by stimulating diaphragm muscles to stimulate breathing.

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  • David Albers/Staff
- Eighteen year-old Reggie Lamour, of Naples, sees his remodeled bedroom for the first time after arriving home from five months of treatment for a spinal cord injury on Thursday, June 20, 2013.  After suffering the injury in January which left Lamour paralyzed, he became a candidate for the Broward Children's Center's Center for Innovative Technology program to receive a diaphragmatic pacing system.  The DPS device replaces a ventilator for quadriplegic patients by stimulating diaphragm muscles to stimulate breathing.
  • David Albers/Staff
- Naples resident Jolina Dieudonne celebrates her son, 18-year-old Reggie Lamour, as he moves slightly in his bed at a transitional housing facility for Broward Children's Center on Tuesday, June 18, 2013, in Pompano Beach, Fla.  After suffering a spinal injury in January that left Lamour paralyzed, he became a candidate for the nonprofit's Center for Innovative Technology program to receive a diaphragmatic pacing system.  The DPS device replaces a ventilator for quadriplegic patients by stimulating diaphragm muscles to stimulate breathing.
  • David Albers/Staff
- Cynthia Dieudonne tickles the foot of her brother, 18-year-old Reggie Lamour, as she visits him in a transitional housing facility for Broward Children's Center on Tuesday, June 18, 2013, in Pompano Beach, Fla.  After suffering a spinal injury in January that left Lamour paralyzed, he became a candidate for the nonprofit's Center for Innovative Technology program to receive a diaphragmatic pacing system.  The DPS device replaces a ventilator for quadriplegic patients by stimulating diaphragm muscles to stimulate breathing.
  • David Albers/Staff
- Naples resident Jolina Dieudonne wakes her son, 18-year-old Reggie Lamour, from an afternoon nap at a transitional housing facility for Broward Children's Center on Tuesday, June 18, 2013, in Pompano Beach, Fla.  After suffering a spinal injury in January that left Lamour paralyzed, he became a candidate for the nonprofit's Center for Innovative Technology program to receive a diaphragmatic pacing system. The DPS device replaces a ventilator for quadriplegic patients by stimulating diaphragm muscles to stimulate breathing.
  • Eighteen-year-old Reggie Lamour, of Naples, smiles at his mother as she wakes him from an afternoon nap at a transitional housing facility for Broward Children's Center on Tuesday, June 18, 2013, in Pompano Beach, Fla.  After suffering a spinal injury in January that left Lamour paralyzed, he became a candidate for the nonprofit's Center for Innovative Technology program to receive a diaphragmatic pacing system.  The DPS device replaces a ventilator for quadriplegic patients by stimulating diaphragm muscles to stimulate breathing.
  • David Albers/Staff
- A rugby ball signed by an all-star team sits on display in 18-year-old Reggie Lamour's room at a transitional housing facility for Broward Children's Center on Tuesday, June 18, 2013, in Pompano Beach, Fla.  After suffering a spinal injury in January that left the Naples teen paralyzed, he became a candidate for the nonprofit's Center for Innovative Technology program to receive a diaphragmatic pacing system.  The DPS device replaces a ventilator for quadriplegic patients by stimulating diaphragm muscles to stimulate breathing.
  • David Albers/Staff
- A get-well-soon card from fellow rugby players hangs on the wall of 18-year-old Reggie Lamour's room at a transitional housing facility for Broward Children's Center on Tuesday, June 18, 2013, in Pompano Beach, Fla.  After suffering a spinal injury in January that left Lamour paralyzed, he became a candidate for the nonprofit's Center for Innovative Technology program to receive a diaphragmatic pacing system.  The DPS device replaces a ventilator for quadriplegic patients by stimulating diaphragm muscles to stimulate breathing.
  • David Albers/Staff
- Four wires from a diaphragmatic pacing system, or DPS, enter the abdomen of 18-year-old Reggie Lamour stimulating diaphragm muscles to stimulate breathing.
  • David Albers/Staff
- Inspirational messages decorate a whiteboard in the room of 18-year-old Reggie Lamour at a transitional housing facility for Broward Children's Center on Tuesday, June 18, 2013, in Pompano Beach, Fla.  After suffering a spinal injury in January that left Lamour paralyzed, he became a candidate for the nonprofit's Center for Innovative Technology program to receive a diaphragmatic pacing system.  The DPS device replaces a ventilator for quadriplegic patients by stimulating diaphragm muscles to stimulate breathing.
  • David Albers/Staff
- Respiratory therapist Kathleen Danger, in pink, explains caretaking procedures to Naples resident Jolina Dieudonne, at right, as she prepares for the homecoming of her son, 18-year-old Reggie Lamour, at a transitional housing facility for Broward Children's Center on Tuesday, June 18, 2013, in Pompano Beach, Fla.  After suffering a spinal injury in January that left Lamour paralyzed, he became a candidate for the nonprofit's Center for Innovative Technology program to receive a diaphragmatic pacing system.  The DPS device replaces a ventilator for quadriplegic patients by stimulating diaphragm muscles to stimulate breathing.
  • David Albers/Staff
- Naples resident Jolina Dieudonne runs to greet her son, 18-year-old Reggie Lamour, as he arrives home for the first time after five months of treatment for a spinal cord injury on Thursday, June 20, 2013. After suffering the injury in January which left Lamour paralyzed in January, he became a candidate for the Broward Children's Center's Center for Innovative Technology program to receive a diaphragmatic pacing system.  The DPS device replaces a ventilator for quadriplegic patients by stimulating diaphragm muscles to stimulate breathing.
  • David Albers/Staff
- Eighteen-year-old Reggie Lamour, of Naples, arrives home after five months of treatment for a spinal cord injury on Thursday, June 20, 2013.  After suffering the injury in January which left Lamour paralyzed, he became a candidate for the Broward Children's Center's Center for Innovative Technology program to receive a diaphragmatic pacing system.  The DPS device replaces a ventilator for quadriplegic patients by stimulating diaphragm muscles to stimulate breathing.
  • David Albers/Staff
- Seven-year-old Tashawn Lamour watches with his father, Reynold Lamour, as his older brother, 18-year-old Reggie Lamour, is unloaded from a bus as he arrives home after five months of treatment for a spinal cord injury on Thursday, June 20, 2013.  After suffering the injury in January which left Lamour paralyzed, he became a candidate for the Broward Children's Center's Center for Innovative Technology program to receive a diaphragmatic pacing system.  The DPS device replaces a ventilator for quadriplegic patients by stimulating diaphragm muscles to stimulate breathing.
  • David Albers/Staff
- Eighteen-year-old Reggie Lamour, of Naples, is wheeled up his driveway after arriving home after five months of treatment for a spinal cord injury on Thursday, June 20, 2013.  After suffering the injury in January which left Lamour paralyzed, he became a candidate for the Broward Children's Center's Center for Innovative Technology program to receive a diaphragmatic pacing system.  The DPS device replaces a ventilator for quadriplegic patients by stimulating diaphragm muscles to stimulate breathing.
  • David Albers/Staff
- LaShawn McCray, director of medical operations for the Broward Children's Center, and respiratory therapist Kathleen Danger setup the bedroom of 18-year-old Naples resident Reggie Lamour as he arrives home from five months of treatment for a spinal cord injury on Thursday, June 20, 2013.  After suffering the injury in January which left Lamour paralyzed, he became a candidate for the Broward Children's Center's Center for Innovative Technology program to receive a diaphragmatic pacing system.  The DPS device replaces a ventilator for quadriplegic patients by stimulating diaphragm muscles to stimulate breathing.
  • David Albers/Staff
- Naples resident Reynold Lamour finishes installing a television in the bedroom of his son, 18-year-old Reggie Lamour, as the teen arrives home from five months of treatment for a spinal cord injury on Thursday, June 20, 2013.  After suffering the injury in January which left the Naples teen paralyzed, he became a candidate for the Broward Children's Center's Center for Innovative Technology program to receive a diaphragmatic pacing system.  The DPS device replaces a ventilator for quadriplegic patients by stimulating diaphragm muscles to stimulate breathing.
  • David Albers/Staff
-Cynthia Dieudonne, right, tickles the foot of her brother, 18-year-old Reggie Lamour, after he arrived home from five months of treatment for a spinal cord injury on Thursday, June 20, 2013.  After suffering the injury in January which left Lamour paralyzed, he became a candidate for the Broward Children's Center's Center for Innovative Technology program to receive a diaphragmatic pacing system.  The DPS device replaces a ventilator for quadriplegic patients by stimulating diaphragm muscles to stimulate breathing.
  • David Albers/Staff
- Naples resident Reynold Lamour visits with his son, 18-year-old Reggie Lamour, as he arrives home from five months of treatment for a spinal cord injury on Thursday, June 20, 2013.  After suffering the injury in January which left Lamour paralyzed, he became a candidate for the Broward Children's Center's Center for Innovative Technology program to receive a diaphragmatic pacing system.  The DPS device replaces a ventilator for quadriplegic patients by stimulating diaphragm muscles to stimulate breathing.
  • David Albers/Staff
- Eighteen year-old Reggie Lamour, of Naples, visits with friends and siblings after arriving home from five months of treatment for a spinal cord injury on Thursday, June 20, 2013.  After suffering the injury in January which left Lamour paralyzed, he became a candidate for the Broward Children's Center's Center for Innovative Technology program to receive a diaphragmatic pacing system.  The DPS device replaces a ventilator for quadriplegic patients by stimulating diaphragm muscles to stimulate breathing.
  • David Albers/Staff
- Eighteen-year-old Reggie Lamour, center, poses for a photo with Austin Arroyo, 17, left, and Aaron Arroyo, 19 after arriving home from five months of treatment for a spinal cord injury on Thursday, June 20, 2013. After suffering the injury in January which left Lamour paralyzed, he became a candidate for the Broward Children's Center's Center for Innovative Technology program to receive a diaphragmatic pacing system.  The DPS device replaces a ventilator for quadriplegic patients by stimulating diaphragm muscles to stimulate breathing.

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