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Killer bees, Marco Island

See larger Larry returns the smoke pot to the truck. 
 /Kathleen Tuttle Special to the Eagle

Photo by Kathleen G. Tuttle

Larry returns the smoke pot to the truck.
/Kathleen Tuttle Special to the Eagle

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  • Licensed beekeeper David Gatley closes the door to his truck.  He wears a net to protect his face and neck from stings. 
 /Kathleen Tuttle Special to the Eagle
  • Larry returns the smoke pot to the truck. 
 /Kathleen Tuttle Special to the Eagle
  • Tony wears protective clothing to shield him from Africanized bee stings. 
 /Kathleen Tuttle Special to the Eagle
  • David’s Beehaven workers use smoke to calm down Africanized bees as they attach an artificial hive next to where the bees had built a hive. 
 /Kathleen Tuttle Special to the Eagle
  • The sign warns neighbors to keep away as Africanized bees are removed from a home in old Marco. 
 /Kathleen Tuttle Special to the Eagle
  • Stucco is removed to expose Africanized bees in a wall in a home in old Marco 
 /Kathleen Tuttle Special to the Eagle
  • Licensed beekeeper David Gatley shows the bee stings on his arm. 
 /Kathleen Tuttle Special to the Eagle
  • Licensed beekeeper David Gatley proudly stands next to his truck after his men successfully removed the remnants of the old hive and attached an artificial hive. 
 /Kathleen Tuttle Special to the Eagle
  • Africanized bees swarm the artificial hive that was placed in a wall in a home in old Marco.  The artificial hive will be taken to Pine Island where an Italian queen will replace the Africanized queen. 
 /Kathleen Tuttle Special to the Eagle

The sign stating:“Danger, Africanized bee removal, keep away,” in front of a home in old Marco is enough to induce a panic attack. How can we have Africanized bees on Marco? The state of Florida considers all feral bees to be Africanized. Colonists imported European honeybees from Europe in the 1600s and 1700s. The African bees were imported to Brazil in the 1950s. African bees are the most productive but are not good for beekeeping because of their vicious nature. They slowly worked their way from Brazil to Texas and then to Florida.

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