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Bird Flu on the rise in Asia, China stops live poultry sales

See larger Health workers in full protective gear pick up a killed chicken after suffocated them by using carbon dioxide at a wholesale poultry market in Hong Kong, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014. Hong Kong authorities began culling 20,000 birds at a wholesale market after poultry from southern mainland China tested positive for the H7N9 virus, the first time it had been found in imported poultry in Hong Kong. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

Health workers in full protective gear pick up a killed chicken after suffocated them by using carbon dioxide at a wholesale poultry market in Hong Kong, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014. Hong Kong authorities began culling 20,000 birds at a wholesale market after poultry from southern mainland China tested positive for the H7N9 virus, the first time it had been found in imported poultry in Hong Kong. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

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  • A health worker in full protective gear throws a killed chicken to a rubbish bin after suffocated them by using carbon dioxide at a wholesale poultry market in Hong Kong, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014. Hong Kong authorities began culling 20,000 birds at a wholesale market after poultry from southern mainland China tested positive for the H7N9 virus, the first time it had been found in imported poultry in Hong Kong. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
  • Health workers in full protective wait to get in a wholesale poultry market before culling the poultry in Hong Kong, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014. Hong Kong authorities began culling 20,000 birds at a wholesale market after poultry from southern mainland China tested positive for the H7N9 virus, the first time it had been found in imported poultry in Hong Kong. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
  • In this Friday, Jan. 24, 2014 photo, a worker disinfects cages at a closed poultry store in Hangzhou in east China's Zhejiang province. Authorities in eastern China said Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014, they will ban live poultry sales after an increase in the number of people infected with the H7N9 strain of bird flu, with the busy Chinese New Year travel period already under way. So far this year, H7N9 has killed 19 people in China and infected 96, Feng Zijian, the deputy director of the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention said Monday, according to state media. (AP Photo) CHINA OUT
  • Health workers in full protective wait to get in a wholesale poultry market before culling the poultry in Hong Kong, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014. Hong Kong authorities began culling 20,000 birds at a wholesale market after poultry from southern mainland China tested positive for the H7N9 virus, the first time it had been found in imported poultry in Hong Kong. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
  • Health workers in full protective wait to get in to a wholesale poultry market before culling the poultry in Hong Kong, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014. Hong Kong authorities began culling 20,000 birds at a wholesale market after poultry from southern mainland China tested positive for the H7N9 virus, the first time it had been found in imported poultry in Hong Kong. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
  • Health workers in full protective gear pick up a killed chicken after suffocated them by using carbon dioxide at a wholesale poultry market in Hong Kong, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014. Hong Kong authorities began culling 20,000 birds at a wholesale market after poultry from southern mainland China tested positive for the H7N9 virus, the first time it had been found in imported poultry in Hong Kong. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
  • Health workers in full protective gear slaughter chickens by using carbon dioxide at a wholesale poultry market in Hong Kong, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014. Hong Kong authorities began culling 20,000 birds at the wholesale market after poultry from southern mainland China tested positive for the H7N9 virus, the first time it had been found in imported poultry in Hong Kong. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
  • Health workers in full protective gear walk at a wholesale poultry market before culling the poultry in Hong Kong, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014. Hong Kong authorities began culling 20,000 birds at the wholesale market after poultry from southern mainland China tested positive for the H7N9 virus, the first time it had been found in imported poultry in Hong Kong. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
  • Health workers in full protective gear pick up killed chickens in plastic bags after suffocated them by using carbon dioxide at a wholesale poultry market in Hong Kong, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014. Hong Kong authorities began culling 20,000 birds at a wholesale market after poultry from southern mainland China tested positive for the H7N9 virus, the first time it had been found in imported poultry in Hong Kong. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

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