Looking Back

Historic photos and postcards from the Naples area.

Full gallery »Historic Photos: Fort Myers

  • The Lee County Bank in Fort Myers. Note on the back reads: 'When Lee County, Florida, was formed in 1887, one great name --Robert E. Lee-- was selected for this county and through the years that name has been the symbol for the Southern Hospitality and courtesy for which Lee County is famous.' From Royal Palm Studios in Fort Myers. State Archives of Florida
  • Postcard, postmarked 1941, showing The Bradford hotel in Fort Myers. From the Hugh C. Leighton company in Portland, Maine. State Archives of Florida
  • Lee County Court House in Fort Myers, from the E.C. Kropp company of Milwaukee, Wis.  State Archives of Florida
  • View in front of Royal Palm Hotel in Fort Myers. From the Asheville Post Card Company of Asheville, N.C. State Archives of Florida
  • The Royal Palm Hotel in Fort Myers, from the E.C. Kropp company of Milwaukee, Wis.  State Archives of Florida
  • Unusual banyan tree located at Court House square in Fort Myers. Postmarked 1951. From Tichnor Bros, Inc. of Boston. State Archives of Florida


Full gallery »Historic Photos: Fort Myers

  • 1918 postcard from Royal Palm Studios showing the Municipal yacht basin in Fort Myers
  • Card postmarked September 21, 1945, from Tichnor Bros, Inc. of Boston. Shows First Street in Fort Myers. Text read: 'Luxuriant stately palms abound in this enchanted state of the South. Among the most beautiful of these is the towering royal palms which are unsurpassed in height and beauty.' Gift from Beverly Huff / State Archives of Florida
  • 1942 postcard printed by E.C. Kropp of Milwaukee, Wis., showing Fort Myers Beach.
  • Postcard from Tichnor Bros, Inc. of Boston, showing boaters fishing on the Caloosahatchee River
  • Postcard from the Gator Card company of Fort Myers, showing driftwood on Sanibel Island. Harmon / State Archives of Florida
  • Early 1900s card from Tichnor Bros, Inc. of Boston, showing Seminole Indian babies near Fort Myers. Notes suggest they came from the Musa Isle Indian Village near Miami. Note on the card read: 'The Seminole Indians who make the Florida Everglades their home, are a strange and unique race. They are skillful fishermen and good hunters; wear a distinctive costume of horizontal striped material and are probably the most simple, primintive people still living in the United States.' Gift from Beverly Huff / State Archives of Florida

Historic photos and postcards of Fort Myers.



Full gallery »Historic Photos: Fort Myers Postcards

  • Winter home of Thomas A. Edison. In the early-to-mid 1920s, John H. Schwegler of Fort Myers printed a souvenir view book containing 16 postcards from 'Beautiful Fort Myers, Florida - the gate city of the Tropics.' Florida State Archives
  • View of river from grounds of Thomas A. Edison's home. In the early-to-mid 1920s, John H. Schwegler of Fort Myers printed a souvenir view book containing 16 postcards from 'Beautiful Fort Myers, Florida - the gate city of the Tropics.' Florida State Archives
  • Bird's eye view of business section from court house. In the early-to-mid 1920s, John H. Schwegler of Fort Myers printed a souvenir view book containing 16 postcards from 'Beautiful Fort Myers, Florida - the gate city of the Tropics.' Florida State Archives
  • The Caloosahatchee River above Fort Myers. In the early-to-mid 1920s, John H. Schwegler of Fort Myers printed a souvenir view book containing 16 postcards from 'Beautiful Fort Myers, Florida - the gate city of the Tropics.' Florida State Archives
  • Royal Palm Hotel. In the early-to-mid 1920s, John H. Schwegler of Fort Myers printed a souvenir view book containing 16 postcards from 'Beautiful Fort Myers, Florida - the gate city of the Tropics.' Florida State Archives
  • Tropical foliage in the grounds of Walter Langford. In the early-to-mid 1920s, John H. Schwegler of Fort Myers printed a souvenir view book containing 16 postcards from 'Beautiful Fort Myers, Florida - the gate city of the Tropics.' Florida State Archives

Historic postcards showing downtown Fort Myers.



Full gallery »Historic Photos: Koreshan Unity in Estero

  • Historic Photos: Koreshan Unity
  • Historic Photos: Koreshan Unity
  • Historic Photos: Koreshan Unity
  • Historic Photos: Koreshan Unity
  • Historic Photos: Koreshan Unity
  • Historic Photos: Koreshan Unity

Dr. Cyrus Reed Teed, founder of the Koreshan Universology, was born Oct. 18, 1839 in Teedsville, N.Y. Teed studied medicine, with his uncle in 1859 and had his 'illumination' in 1869. Dr. Teed took the name 'Koresh,' the Hebrew translation for Cyrus, meaning shepherd. The colonists believed that the entire universe existed within a giant, hollow sphere with all life on its inner surface. For them, the earth is practically stationary with the sun at the center of a the sphere and revolving once in 24 hrs. Teed moved from New York to Chicago with his followers and established a communal life 1886. His following grew to about 200 members and the group began relocating to Estero in 1894. The Koreshans built and operated a printing facility, boat works, cement works, sawmill, bakery, store and hostelry. After the death of Dr. Teed in 1908, at the age of 69 on Dec. 22, 1908, membership of his religious group began to decline.



Full gallery »Historic Photos: Everglades National Park

  • Red mangrove tree in Everglades in 1958. A fine lookout station for hungry brown pelicans.
  • Seminole Village, Tamiami Trail in 1947. National Park Service Historic Photograph Collection
  • Deer poacher in Glades being checked by Ranger in air boat in 1958. National Park Service Historic Photograph Collection
  • Ranger placing 'Border Line' markers from air boat in 1958. National Park Service Historic Photograph Collection
  • This 1937 photo shows a lagoon in the Everglades with Spanish Moss trailing into the water. National Park Service Historic Photograph Collection
  • The American Egret which was prized for its feathers was near extinction when protected by law. The bird is now making a real come-back within the boundaries of Everglades. (circa 1952) National Park Service Historic Photograph Collection


Full gallery »Treasure Hunt

  • William G. Tracy, A.I.A. Architect
360 12th Avenue, South
Box 296, Naples, Florida
  • Answer:
Keewaydin Island boathouse at the end of Gordon Drive.
  • Answer: Naples Pier
  • Answer: Water tank in Port Royal
  • Answer: Trinity by the Cove Church


Full gallery »Looking Back: Historic photos from Naples (2011 edition)

  • Looking Back

In 1966 this Daily News picture was very important, as the Kiwanis Hawks were to play in Punta Gorda. No other information about the contest is available from the vintage clipping shared by Emolee  Barrett of Naples, mother of the player who penciled "me" onto the photo. Barrett says the lads were 9 and 10 years old and comprised "a great deal of the boys who were in Naples at that time." "We were still a wonderful small town then," she writes. The caption from the original Daily News edition gave these names: Front row, left to right, Steve Russell, Jerry Hatcher, James Miller, Rodger  Morris, Tommy Barrett, Roy Caple, Bill Longshore, Ted Stevenson, Toby Moreau, Curtis Hamm, Bruce Stevenson and Pete Winters; second row, left to right, Alex Winters, Mike Arthur, Tommy Eggelston, Greg Decker, Cary Howard, James Koliopuplos, Jeff Barber, Randy Gore, Jimmy Traer, Mike Bright, Bill Kilgore and Steve Johnson; back row, left to right, Paul Hazelwood, Albert Fortin, Tim Bell, Jim Decker, Steve Alander, Bruce Griffen, David Barkey, Lance Stahlman, Mark Sentovich, Dennis Hatcher and Walter Green. Their coach was Barry Kee.
  • When the big 'Naples Daily News’’ sign came down at Central Avenue, site of the newspaper’s former hub, a neighboring business saved it from the scrap heap. Robert McDaniel, a longtime local resident, put it in his Downtown Auto repair shop, which already hosted old signs for Coca-Cola and the Exxon station where he got his start at age 15 in 1976 at Sixth Avenue North and U.S. 41 North in Naples. The gas station site now has a bank on it; he has been at the Downtown Auto site since 1993.
  • The Daily News' Aug. 14 feature about reader Mike Stanton's days as a pilot of the Douglas Skyraider fighter plane in the Korean Conflict generated lots of interest. The Daily News got a nice note and photo, which we published the next Sunday, from another pilot of the era. Now comes a letter from James W. Kissick of Bradenton Beach. He says the photo above shows him 'making the historic 50,000th landing on the USS Coral Sea in the mid-Atlantic, thereby winning the contest'' over the USS Midway and USS Roosevelt. The dated ticker tape on the bottom of the photo verifies his niche in history: 'Mr. Kissick in Plane 25 made the 50,000 (cq) landing.''
  • Little did they know that when they made these snapshots they would have such personal keepsakes of the World Trade Center. Ann Sprowls of Naples says she made the aerial view above, now discolored, en route to Europe in the mid- to late-1980s. Gervase Audette captured late afternoon sun on the twin towers from a cruise ship in 1997.
  • Little did they know that when they made these snapshots they would have such personal keepsakes of the World Trade Center. Ann Sprowls of Naples says she made the aerial view above, now discolored, en route to Europe in the mid- to late-1980s. Gervase Audette captured late afternoon sun on the twin towers from a cruise ship in 1997.

These classic photos were published in 2011 in the Sunday Perspective section of the Naples Daily News.



Full gallery »Looking Back: Southwest Florida from the air

  • Not many communities can say they look much the same now as they did in 1969. But environmentally conscious Sanibel can say that, and mean it. That is the Ding Darling Wildlife Preserve and Tarpon Bay at right. Captiva is off the top right of the photo.
  • In 1963, Pine Ridge Road crept eastward (center) then turned into a dirt amid farmland at then-Airport Road. The airport itself at top left is the other key landmark in this remarkable photo.
  • By the early 1960s, the Collier County Government Center anchored the corner of U.S. 41 East and Airport Road (now Airport-Pulling Road). Naples Municipal Airport is at top left, and row crops flourished in the urban area. Today the government center is undergoing an expansion as striking as the arrival of the county seat from Everglades City must have been in the pictured era.
  • What started on Marco Island in the early 1960s ground to a halt 20 years later when the U.S. Supreme Court barred the dredging-and-filling that made Marco what it is today. This was the scene in 1964 at the main gateway on and off the island with the canals at Marco Island Yacht Club. That would be Bald Eagle Drive at right and San Marco Road visible from left to right, above.
  • Clouds provide an artistic array of shadows in this westward view of East Naples and Naples from east of then-Airport Road and Naples Municipal Airport in 1965. Photo owner and archivist Art Ullmann of Naples observes the Brookside development had taken shape at the west end of Estey Avenue near center, to the south of the airport.
  • Can you guess where? Think not Naples. Think north. Think toward Bonita Springs. Think looking south. This is the view in early 1969 looking from above Bonita Shores and south to Wiggins Pass — pre-high rises. Now do you 'see' it?

Enjoy these aerial views of Southwest Florida of yesteryear.



Full gallery »Looking Back: Historical photos from Naples, Marco, Florida

  • There weren't always roads on Marco Island. Photo courtesy of Bill Perdichizzi and the Marco Island Historical Society.
  • Car traffic on the roads has changed dramatically over the years in Naples. So has people traffic on the beach. Reader Anne McCaffrey offers this 1965 photo she made of her two children, Steve, 8, and Leanne, 11, in one of the lifeguard chairs that used to be at Lowdermilk Park.
  • Reader Jim McTague writes, 'when I was digging through some office pictures, I came across this — from about 1978.' Pictured is my daughter, then Jo McTague, now Jo Atkinson, on the wing of a 'pot plane' near Everglades Boulevard south of Alligator Alley. As you may recall, this was a favorite landing strip for airborne loads of marijuana and, for some, it was the end of the line. Not exactly a picture of a phase of development, but history nevertheless.
  • One of the first golf links was at the Naples Hotel — not to be confused with the Naples Beach Hotel and Golf Club. This photo is from a 1920s Naples Hotel brochure that has this to say about golf: 'Much money has been expended on our golf course during the past year. The fairways are good, the greens have been rebuilt and will compare favorably with the better courses in the South. Naples probably has more good golf days than any other section of Florida. Many come to Naples for the golf. The course is in charge of an expert from the North who is at all times courteous and ready to instruct and assist beginners.'
  • Vanderbilt Beach, 1961-62 — This scene of an uncrowded, small-town seaside were made in 1961-21 at Vanderbilt Beach, within the shadows of today's Ritz-Carlton, Naples. Patricia Florestano, who now has a condo in Pelican Bay, remembers that her father, W.L. 'Jack' Sherer, was a salesman at the little realty office/cabin that was smack dab on the beach at the end of Vanderbilt Beach Road, where everybody parked. The office was named Faber Hair Realty, after the owner, a family friend from Washington, D.C. A special land deal was posted daily on a blackboard behind the station wagon.
  • Vanderbilt Beach, 1961-62 — This scene of an uncrowded, small-town seaside were made in 1961-21 at Vanderbilt Beach, within the shadows of today's Ritz-Carlton, Naples. Patricia Florestano, who now has a condo in Pelican Bay, which she remembers as virgin wetlands, is at left with her mother, Virginia.

Most of these historical photos were published in 2004 in the Sunday Perspective section of the Naples Daily News.



Full gallery »Looking Back: Historical photos, postcards from Naples, Southwest Florida

  • Anyone for swimming? They surely don't look dressed for tennis, at least by today's standards. This undated promotional Naples postcard was part of a souvenir package put out by the Edwin M. Watson real estate firm.
  • Here's a picture of a 17-foot sawfish (angler unknown) caught in the early 1950s at the Naples Pier. You were allowed to shark fish form the pier in those days. The shark and sawfish would move into the pier area during January and February after the black mullet run.
  • Jungle Larry collected wild creatures for many years in many lands. He was formerly with Frank 'Bring 'Em Back Alive' Buck. Millions saw Jungle Larry on TV and at Cedar Point, Ohio, and also Naples-on-the-Gulf, Florida. This undated promotional Naples postcard was part of a souvenir package put out by the Edwin M. Watson real estate firm.
  •  In 1965, Naples Mayor Archie Turner presided over the city's 40th anniversary party. Queen of the event was Mrs. Jerry Capuano, in an era before the Collier County News — and later the Daily News — published married women's own first names. The rest of the caption says: 'The judging took place in the downtown parking lot on Friday evening with a crowd of more than 1,500 partygoers present. The mayor is properly attired for dunking.'
  • We have published older photos in this space over the years — but few as illuminating. This is the Downtown Rotary Club of Naples softball team about 30 years ago — either the very end of the 1970s or the start of the '80s. Top row from left: Al Actistino, Doug Rogers, John Nocera, Al Hackney, unidentified, Bill Minarich and Dave Claypool; kneeling: Hank Caballero, Don Hashagen, Corbin Wyant, Tom Bringardner and Nick Kalvin.
  • The year: 1967. The event: the pageant for Naples' Swamp Buggy Queen. The caption on this Collier County News photo said: 'In a typical Collier County setting, amid palms and palmettos, 15 of the 20 contestants who will vie for the 1967 Crown of Swamp Buggy Days Queen, pose with one of the unique vehicles which give the festival its name. Elimination competition for choosing eight finalists, who will then compete at the Swamp Buggy Coronation Ball, slated for Saturday night, will be held tomorrow at 8 p.m. in the Naples Senior High School Auditorium. Admission is free and those who attend will be asked to help select eight girls for the final running. Shown above, not necessarily in the order in which they appear, are Cindy Slezsak, Vickie Batcher, Patsy Langford, Gail Below, Debra Engel, Paula Burke, Rebecca Paul, Susan Shearer, Sue Kengel, Julane Brandt, Roni Hill, Ann Scott, Kathy Hendry, Doo Breeden and Karla Pearce.' The winner: Miss Langford, now Pat Martin, is at right of the group of four girls, back row, standing on the buggy.

Most of these historical photos were published in 2004 in the Sunday Perspective section of the Naples Daily News.



Full gallery »Looking Back: Historical photos, postcards from Naples

  • This is a classic. Ruth Pascoe of Naples sent in this snapshot of her made 40 years ago at Vanderbilt Beach in 1970. Nice sunglasses. Nice work by the industrious photographer. Note the small white building on the shore at right. That is not a beach bungalow. That is a hotel. Pascoe recalls it was named Seaside.
  • The old postcard here seems simple enough. We’ve seen ones like it many times before. But for Phyllis Mathers of Naples, it brings back a great story and great memories. Here is the letter she sent to us with the card: The year was 1965. I was in line at the register in the former Grant’s store (now Marshall’s and Office Depot at Naples Shopping Center) perusing the postcard rack. The red and white sail in the picture caught my eye, and the “1600” on the sail confirmed the fact that the boat was my son Shannon’s. On closer examination, I realized the gathering on the beach was indeed our friends and family. That’s Shannon sitting down facing the Gulf and the Ewing family boys, John and Joe, sitting beside him. The two girls lying down are Shannon’s cousins. The girl soaking up the sun on the right is Beckie Brack. Apparently they can take your picture and print it without getting permission, and this particular picture was on note cards and a calendar. We cherish the memory of all the hours on the beach and sailing.
  • It's a photo that has all the elements to tell the story: A lone Seminole Indian and canoe, the wildlife and the Everglades and a poster urging the public to buy, buy, buy. The scene was east of Naples, identified only as Tamiami Canal. Today, billions are spent to undo the environmental damage. The 1920 photo is from the collection of Claude C. Matlach. Glimpses such as the one above are part of 'The Roaring Twenties in Miami Beach and Miami' exhibit at the Southern Florida Historical Museum in Miami or on your personal computer.
  • Believe it or not, this is the La Playa resort on Vanderbilt Beach in 1968, long before the facelifts that made it what it is today and the parking lot/tennis court was turned into a parking garage. The year of this scene: 1968. The resort was a 'motor inn' at the time.
  • The Siesta Terrace Motel - 'seven blocks to the center of town' - gave way to the Thunderbird Motel and now hosts NCH Healthcare System's downtown wellness center at U.S. 41 and Fourth Avenue North. Courtesy of Nina Webber.
  • The old Anchorage Motel on Naples' Third Street South, now condos catered to a 'select clientele.' Courtesy of Nina Webber.

These historical photos were published in 2005 in the Sunday Perspective section of the Naples Daily News.



Full gallery »Looking Back: More classic photos of Naples landmarks

  • The grille work says 'Naples On The Gulf' in an undated family photo of local teacher Leila Canant and her husband, Adolph (A.E.) Canant, who worked for Florida Power & Light at the ice factory near the schoolhouse in Old Naples.
  • The 1933 Old Naples schoolhouse looked more like a house; from left, teachers Anna Lee McSwain, Edith Bryan (Leila's sister), Lucille Buckles and Leila and A.E. Canant.
  • When Jack M. Lamb owned the Cities Service station at Central Avenue and U.S. 41 in Naples in 1963-64 — where the Mobil station and convenience store now reside — he was the lone employee.
  • When Jack M. Lamb owned the Cities Service station at Central Avenue and U.S. 41 in Naples in 1963-64 — where the Mobil station and convenience store now reside — he was the lone employee. He is at right in the photo; the others are unidentified. The cars and architecture are vintage.
  • This undated postcard says Cove Standard Service was at Naples’ Eighth Street and 11th Avenue South — 'adjacent to City Pier and Sports Spot Marina.' However, the scene seems to more resemble U.S. 41 in the heart of the city. Longtime residents differ on whether they recall a gas station by Crayton Cove — in addition to the stations at Four Corners and the one that became The Mole Hole on Third Street — yet there are no county records to that effect. Nevertheless, the picture-postcard station offered 'wash and polish and free pickup and delivery.' Bob Adams was the manager. Wanda Rimes Rodriguez of Naples, whose parents — Ronnie and Evelyn Rimes, were the owners and operators of the Crayton Cove Standard Oil station in the early 1960s, settles the debate. The station was located at the corner of 12th Avenue South and Eighth Street South, indeed in  Crayton Cove.
  • The unique design of the former Charlene's Restaurant, previously a Dairy Queen, brightens the intersection of Bonita Beach Road and Old 41 Road. Now, it is Taqueria San Julian.

These historical photos were published in 2005 in the Sunday Perspective section of the Naples Daily News.



Full gallery »Looking Back: More classic photos, postcards and ads from Naples

  • The Stewart Motel, also known as the Royal Palm Motel, at First Avenue North in Naples gave way to Enterprise Office Center, a complex of condos, shops and offices. A Daily News reader provided the photograph. Readers with local memorabilia to share are encouraged to upload photos, videos and stories at naplesnews.com/participate.
  • Motel Stewart, 70 N. Tamiami Trail, was owned and operated by Ethel and Art Arvigo. A Daily News reader provided this postcard, dated 1977, when the in-season room rate was $25 per day and the courtyard pool seems to have been frequented by fashion models.
  • This is the Isles of Capri Marina and Motel, circa 1960s. Dick and Kay Larson of East Naples owned and operated it from 1962 to 1966. It would evolve into Jim & Eydie’s restaurant, taking over the gas station and beer/bait shop at right, later Backwater Nick’s restaurant.
  • Isles of Capri Marina and Motel owner Dick Larson, left, in this May 1963 fishing photo, with Waldo Morgan, center, who built the hotel-marina, and friend Bob Carter. They caught those snook off the beach at Coconut Island in less than an hour using live shrimp as bait.
  • Nice catch. Can you guess the name of the boy in this 1956 photo? He is former Bonita Springs Fire Chief Dan Gourley, then age 5. This 350-pound goliath grouper was caught using a mullet as bait off Bonita Beach. Gourley says the massive fish was caught off the beach and hauled to what is now called Riverside Park by Rehard's wrecker service. In the photo is Gourley's late father and mother, Wendell and Ellen. FYI, the bridge in the background is what today separates the park from the upcoming Imperial Landing project downtown. The bridge spans the Imperial River at Old 41 Road — at the time known as U.S. 41. Photo courtesy Dan Gourley and the Bonita Springs Historical Society.
  • Let's go to the beach — and get some shade from the rays!  This is how it was done at the Naples Pier in the early days of Naples, according to a 1950 postcard shared by Paul Stevens.

These historical photos were published in 2006 in the Sunday Perspective section of the Naples Daily News.



Full gallery »Hurricane Donna's 50th anniversary, historical photos

  • Historical photos taken in and about Naples, Florida, looking north on 3rd Street South after Hurricane Donna swept through 50 years ago today. The building which is now Campiello can be seen on the upper right.
  • The remains of the Naples Pier after Hurricane Donna swept through 50 years ago today.
  • Historical photos taken in and about Naples, Florida and of the Naples Beach Hotel showing the aftermath of Hurricane Donna 50 years ago today as it damaged the main wing of the hotel.
  • Historical photos taken in and about Naples, Florida and of the Naples Beach Hotel showing the aftermath of Hurricane Donna 50 years ago today.
  • Historical photos taken in and about Naples, Florida and of the Naples Beach Hotel showing the aftermath of Hurricane Donna 50 years ago today.
  • Historical photos taken in and about Naples, Florida and of the Naples Beach Hotel showing the aftermath of Hurricane Donna 50 years ago today. This is what remained of the dining room area after the tidal surge swept most of the furniture out into the gulf.


Full gallery »Looking Back: Historic photos from Naples

  • Tourist-tacky is nothing new. Southwest Florida history buff Alvin Lederer shares this 1935 postcard from Collier City, named for perhaps Marco Island’s first homesteader, Confederate Army Capt. William Collier, no relation to the county’s founding family. Collier built a hotel that today survives in part as the Old Marco Inn. The Collier County Museum reports Collier City was incorporated as the whole island in 1927 and was disbanded by the Florida Legislature due to inactivity in 1957. The modern-day city of Marco, where there is lots of activity, incorporated in 1997. Upload your classic postcards and historical images at naplesnews.com/participate.
  • Unidentified 1916 guests at Palm Cottage, preserved today as a mini-museum a block east of the Naples Pier, pose with their exotic trophy.
  • Spring break on a Naples beach — in April 1915. Residents and their winter guests turn out for Gymkhana Day, a popular local fest that featured picnic lunches, foot races and field day games. The buildings in the background, now long gone, served as beach cabanas and changing rooms. Courtesy of the Collier County Museum. Readers with memorabilia to share are encouraged to upload it online at naplesnews.com/participate.
  • Collier County history buff Alvin Lederer shares this truly vintage scene from Everglades City, which he plans to donate to Everglades City archives: “I bought (on eBay) the original photo of the Everglades Trolley that Barron Gift Collier brought down from Coney Island, N.Y., dated 1926 — and after 81 years the photo is going back to Everglades City. ... The building in the background is the Everglades Bank,” now a bed and breakfast. The people in the photo are not identified. Upload your classic photos at naplesnews.com/participate.
  • The ice plant — which doubled as an electricity-generating plant — was near Fifth Street and 11th Avenue South. The Collier County Museum estimates it was there until the mid-1960s. This long-ago landmark of Old Naples is brought back to life via rare family photos courtesy of Emilie Oppenheim. Readers with local memorabilia to share are encouraged to upload them at naplesnews.com/participate.
  • The Naples water tower, stood near the old — and new — City Hall until 1977, according to the Collier County Museum. This long-ago landmark of Old Naples is brought back to life via rare family photos courtesy of Emilie Oppenheim. Readers with local memorabilia to share are encouraged to upload them at naplesnews.com/participate.

These classic photos were published in 2007 in the Sunday Perspective section of the Naples Daily News.



Full gallery »Looking Back: Historic photos from Naples (2008 edition)

  • Speedboats? On Lake Avalon in East Naples last weekend? No, this was about 40 years ago on Naples Bay, where racing now usually means the Great Dock Canoe Race every spring and boat speed limits spark long debates. Naples resident Dave Workinger says races were held in the late 1960s and early ’70s. That’s The Cove Inn in the background of this shot looking west from Aqualane Shores. The photo was made by Workinger’s father, the late Doyle Workinger. Naples City Dock can be seen beyond the boaters at left. Readers with local memorabilia to share are encouraged to call the Perspective editor at 263-4773.
  • Daily News reader Wayne Peters believes his 1989 photo is from the first Naples St. Patrick’s Day Parade. Actually, that would be the 10th annual parade, but it’s still a great photo. It shows the late Rev. Thomas Goggin, then the pastor of St. Ann Catholic Church, as the parade gathered there that year in Old Naples. Lore has it that Goggin was an early backer of originators of the idea for the parade, which has grown into one of the biggest St. Patrick’s Day parades in the Southeast.
  • Governor C. Farris Bryant with members of Florida’s Miccosukee Tribe of Indians. The Miccosukee tribe were ideologically and politically separate from the Seminoles and organized as their own tribe in 1962.
  • In the late 1800s there was a push by the federal government to mainstream the Seminoles. The semi-nomadic Seminoles depended on hunting and trapping for their livelihood. Their hunting range was the Florida Everglades.
  • Daily News reader Loretta Necas, 93, of Naples Park thinks she knows the name of the mystery woman featured in this 1959 street scene from Fifth Avenue South. She appeared to be sweeping the sidewalk. Necas says the woman was Mary Foster, a friend who used to work at a variety store that saved Naples residents the long drive to Fort Myers for items such as socks at marked-up prices. Now, what was the name of the store?  Look hard and you can see the time and temperature clock that was the trademark of the pioneer Bank of Naples, center left, that now is a three-story mixed-use building — still anchored by a bank. Submitted by Paul Lindabury of Naples. Readers with local memorabilia or clues to the woman’s identity are encouraged to call the Perspective editor at 263-4773.
  • Henrietta “Ret” Ingram at her home in Naples in 1959.

These classic photos were published in 2008 in the Sunday Perspective section of the Naples Daily News.



Full gallery »Looking Back: Historic photos from Naples (2010 edition)

  • Looking back
Linda Soto Harvard from Estero and Coconut, Fla., has this photo in her vintage collection and wants to know if anyone could identify the players on a 1930s Estero baseball team. Chester Keene of Naples, who corresponds with Harvard, says he is advised the auto is a 1932 Ford. Readers with clues can contact Keene at 649-0836. The Daily News will let you know what he learns.
  • With the headlines these days about the former Daily News headquarters on Naples' Central Avenue being razed, we take a look back to the Daily News coverage when the building was going up in 1969. Among the construction movers and shakers in the photo at left is the late Tim O'Connor, the publisher at the time; in the center photo, the trademark ceiling/roofing goes into place; at right there is a scene that few construction sites would have these days, even around the holidays. The Daily News site crew is enjoying some beer. Pat Adams/Naples (3)
  • With the headlines these days about the former Daily News headquarters on Naples' Central Avenue being razed, we take a look back to the Daily News coverage when the building was going up in 1969. Among the construction movers and shakers in the photo at left is the late Tim O'Connor, the publisher at the time; in the center photo, the trademark ceiling/roofing goes into place; at right there is a scene that few construction sites would have these days, even around the holidays. The Daily News site crew is enjoying some beer. Pat Adams/Naples (3)
  • With the headlines these days about the former Daily News headquarters on Naples' Central Avenue being razed, we take a look back to the Daily News coverage when the building was going up in 1969. Among the construction movers and shakers in the photo at left is the late Tim O'Connor, the publisher at the time; in the center photo, the trademark ceiling/roofing goes into place; at right there is a scene that few construction sites would have these days, even around the holidays. The Daily News site crew is enjoying some beer. Pat Adams/Naples (3)
  • Looking back
Before the memories of this election year fade away, look back to other years' local campaign gear. Peter Van Arsdale ran for mayor of Naples in 2000, losing to the late Bonnie MacKenzie; the late Lyle Richardson ran for mayor in 1990, losing to Rudd Crawford; Mike Volpe ran for Florida House District 76 in 1994, losing to Burt Saunders. The Sabal Bay button is from the late 1980s and refers to a Naples Bay marina project that caused a major controversy for Naples City Council; it stands completed today as Hamilton Harbor.
  • Looking back
For the movie "Swashbuckler," the employees at the former Kon Tiki theater in Naples dressed in period garb and posed for snapshots. One of the employees, Alena Sager, still has photos and is happy to share. That is her with the manager, Jim Bell Jr., in the lobby. "We were trying to look mean," she says. They joined the rest of the crew out front for another photo. The Kon Tiki later became the home of the Naples Players;  now the site hosts the Allen Systems Group headquarters at Bayfront at U.S. 41 East and Goodlette-Frank Road.

These classic photos were published in 2010 in the Sunday Perspective section of the Naples Daily News.



Full gallery »Looking Back: Historic photos from Naples (2009 edition)

  • Lawyers today would have a field day with the gap between the railing and the boardwalk if someone fell even the short distance into the water at the Naples Pier. This 1956 photo from the Naples Historical Society shows the landmark Naples Pier four years before Hurricane Donna and an extreme makeover. This scene is from a package of 15 postcards newly offered at local book, drug, hardware and gift stores for $7.99 by Arcadia Publishing of South Carolina. The Naples Historical Society shares in the proceeds. Readers with local memorabilia to share are encouraged to call the Perspective editor at 263-4773.
  • Gulfshore Life magazine shows sportscaster Joe Klimas, right, interviewing today’s Naples Mayor Bill Barnett at a pro tennis event.
  • In the dock space at Naples’ Tin City now anchored by the Double Sunshine tour boat, its 1960s-70s predecessor was self-named Capt. Elwood Starn. (The Dalis was there in between.) Starn and the boat even put out their own postcards. This undated card is courtesy of a Daily News reader who wishes to remain anonymous. The postcard promotional material said: “In Naples, Florida, on the Gulf of Mexico; deep-sea fishing aboard the 65-foot boat ‘Capt. Elwood Starn.’ Fish finder, twin G.M. diesels, snack bar, rod and reel rental; free parking at boat. Daily 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Gordon River Bridge on U.S. 41 East.” Yes, that is the landmark Kelly’s Fish House in the background, to the east. Readers with local memorabilia to share are encouraged to call the Perspective editor at 263-4773.
  • Bill Westman sends a note with the Daily News clipping above: “Attached is a photo of my sister Shelley (Ralston) Westman, who was a carrier for the Daily News in Aqualane Shores back in the late 1960s. This photo was printed in the paper on Christmas Eve 1969. The caption mentions the Santa outfit given to Clyde, the dog, by Shelley’s customers.
  • On the 60th anniversary of Naples’ swamp buggy races, local historian Lila Zuck has compiled “Naples Oldest Tradition, Swamp Buggy Days.”
  • In 1959, the year before Hurricane Donna, modern Naples was taking shape. That is Coquina Sands in white at lower left. The landmark links at the Naples Beach Hotel and Golf Club is above it to the south, with Old Naples and Naples Bay beyond. Look closely and you can see Aqualane Shores and Royal Harbor taking shape on the west and east sides of the bay, respectively. Photo archive courtesy of Art Ullman of Naples; photo made by Roy Caple Sr. Readers with local memorabilia to share are encouraged to call the Perspective editor at 263-4773.

These classic photos were published in 2009 in the Sunday Perspective section of the Naples Daily News.



Full gallery »Looking Back - From the Air

  • In 1963, Pine Ridge Road crept eastward (center) then turned into a dirt amid farmland at then-Airport Road. The airport itself at top left is the other key landmark in this remarkable photo.
  • By the early 1960s, the Collier County Government Center anchored the corner of U.S. 41 East and Airport Road (now Airport-Pulling Road). Naples Municipal Airport is at top left, and row crops flourished in the urban area. Today the government center is undergoing an expansion as striking as the arrival of the county seat from Everglades City must have been in the pictured era.
  • What started on Marco Island in the early 1960s ground to a halt 20 years later when the U.S. Supreme Court barred the dredging-and-filling that made Marco what it is today. This was the scene in 1964 at the main gateway on and off the island with the canals at Marco Island Yacht Club. That would be Bald Eagle Drive at right and San Marco Road visible from left to right, above.
  • Clouds provide an artistic array of shadows in this westward view of East Naples and Naples from east of then-Airport Road and Naples Municipal Airport in 1965. Photo owner and archivist Art Ullmann of Naples observes the Brookside development had taken shape at the west end of Estey Avenue near center, to the south of the airport.
  • Can you guess where? Think not Naples. Think north. Think toward Bonita Springs. Think looking south. This is the view in early 1969 looking from above Bonita Shores and south to Wiggins Pass — pre-high rises. Now do you 'see' it?
  • This is one of the most fascinating old photos we have published over the past several years. Though it shows what is a hub of growth these days, it is seldom seen in aerials that have reached the Daily News. This is Pine Ridge Road in the late 1960s looking west, going past Goodlette-Frank Road and U.S. 41 toward the beach where Waterside Shops and The Registry Resort sit today. Note the light-colored, horizontal images at the northwest corner of Goodlette and Pine Ridge. Those are coops from the old egg farm.

Enjoy these aerial views of the Southwest Florida of yesteryear.




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