Oil in the Gulf of Mexico

Full gallery »Gulf oil spill affect on coral

  • This September 2010 photo provided by Discover Team 2010 shows deep sea corals on the bottom of the northern Gulf of Mexico, not far from where BP's underwater oil well blew out on April 20. Scientists are studying whether the crude damaged the corals or will lead to long-term impacts. (AP Photo/Discover Team 2010)
  • This September 2010 photo provided by Discover Team 2010 shows deep sea corals on the bottom of the northern Gulf of Mexico, not far from where BP's underwater oil well blew out on April 20. Scientists are studying whether the crude damaged the corals or will lead to long-term impacts. (AP Photo/Discover Team 2010)
  • This September 2010 photo provided by Discover Team 2010 shows deep sea corals on the bottom of the northern Gulf of Mexico, not far from where BP's underwater oil well blew out on April 20. Scientists are studying whether the crude damaged the corals or will lead to long-term impacts. (AP Photo/Discover Team 2010)
  • This September 2010 photo provided by Discover Team 2010 shows deep sea corals on the bottom of the northern Gulf of Mexico, not far from where BP's underwater oil well blew out on April 20. Scientists are studying whether the crude damaged the corals or will lead to long-term impacts. (AP Photo/Discover Team 2010)

So far, it appears coral in the Gulf oil spill area dodged a bullet, but more research is needed.



Full gallery »Yet another oil rig explosion off of Louisiana

  • Boats are seen spraying water on an oil and gas platform that exploded in the Gulf of Mexico, of the coast of Louisiana., Thursday, Sept. 2, 2010. All 13 crew members were rescued.  (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
  • Boats are seen spraying water on an oil and gas platform that exploded in the Gulf of Mexico, of the coast of Louisiana., Thursday, Sept. 2, 2010. All 13 crew members were rescued.  (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
  • Gov. Bobby Jindal talks to the media during a news conference about the oil platform explosion off the Louisiana coast on Thursday, Sept. 2, 2010.   (AP Photo/ The Advocate, Arthur D. lauck)
  • A person believed to be survivor of an oil and gas platform exploion in the Gulf of Mexico, is helped off a Coast Guard rescue helicopter on the heliport of Terrebonne General Hospital, where injured and survivors were taken, in Houma , Louisiana., Thursday, Sept. 2, 2010. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
  • Boats are seen spraying water on an oil and gas platform that exploded in the Gulf of Mexico, off the coast of Louisiana., Thursday, Sept. 2, 2010. All 13 crew members were rescued.  (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
  • **CORRECTS DISTANCE OFFSHORE TO 100 MILES, NOT 75 MILES** Two workers, left, who were rescued from an oil production platform that exploded 75 miles south of Vermillion Bay walk away from a U.S. Coast Guard helicopter on the roof of Terrebonne General Medical Center in Houma, La., Thursday, Sept. 2, 2010. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)


Full gallery »Collier fisherman catches BP claims check

  • Normally fisherman Johnny Brown would be hauling in crabs off the waters of Grand Isle, La., but this year the waters are closed to the fishermen due to the BP's Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Brown is now moored at Capri Fisheries on Isle of Capri making routine boat repairs that he normally doesn't have time to do when he's out fishing and making money. More than half of Brown's yearly income came from the waters off Louisiana, which has forced him to file a claim with BP to reclaim the money lost from the Gulf of Mexico being closed to fishing.  Jason Easterly/Special to the Daily News
  • Normally fisherman Johnny Brown would be hauling in crabs off the waters of Grand Isle, La., but this year the waters are closed to the fishermen due to the BP's Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Brown is now moored at Capri Fisheries on Isle of Capri making routine boat repairs that he normally doesn't have time to do when he's out fishing and making money. More than half of Brown's yearly income came from the waters off Louisiana, which has forced him to file a claim with BP to reclaim the money lost from the Gulf of Mexico being closed to fishing.  Jason Easterly/Special to the Daily News
  • Normally fisherman Johnny Brown would be hauling in crabs off the waters of Grand Isle, La., but this year the waters are closed to the fishermen due to the BP's Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Brown is now moored at Capri Fisheries on Isle of Capri making routine boat repairs that he normally doesn't have time to do when he's out fishing and making money. More than half of Brown's yearly income came from the waters off Louisiana, which has forced him to file a claim with BP to reclaim the money lost from the Gulf of Mexico being closed to fishing.  Jason Easterly/Special to the Daily News
  • Normally fisherman Johnny Brown would be hauling in crabs off the waters of Grand Isle, La., but this year the waters are closed to the fishermen due to the BP's Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Brown is now moored at Capri Fisheries on Isle of Capri making routine boat repairs that he normally doesn't have time to do when he's out fishing and making money. More than half of Brown's yearly income came from the waters off Louisiana, which has forced him to file a claim with BP to reclaim the money lost from the Gulf of Mexico being closed to fishing.  Jason Easterly/Special to the Daily News
  • Normally fisherman Johnny Brown would be hauling in crabs off the waters of Grand Isle, La., but this year the waters are closed to the fishermen due to the BP's Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Brown is now moored at Capri Fisheries on Isle of Capri making routine boat repairs that he normally doesn't have time to do when he's out fishing and making money. More than half of Brown's yearly income came from the waters off Louisiana, which has forced him to file a claim with BP to reclaim the money lost from the Gulf of Mexico being closed to fishing.  Jason Easterly/Special to the Daily News

Commercial fisherman John “Hollywood” Brown of Everglades City filed a claim with BP in late May.



Full gallery »Bird lovers unite for video to help oil spill victims

  • Christina Giordano, a Marco Island resident and bird lover, has put together a video trilogy,  which showcases video and photographs of companion parrots and birds sent to her from over 100 avian enthusiasts from places as far away as Japan. Christina plays with Chloe a ten year old Moluccan Cockatoo in her outdoor aviary.
  • Christina Giordano, a Marco Island resident and bird lover, has put together a video trilogy,  which showcases video and photographs of companion parrots and birds sent to her from over 100 avian enthusiasts from places as far away as Japan. Christina plays with Chloe a ten year old Moluccan Cockatoo in her outdoor aviary.
  • Christina Giordano, a Marco Island resident and bird lover, is pictured with her one-year-old blue and gold Macaw named zazu. Christina has put together a video trilogy which showcases video and photographs of companion parrots and birds sent to her from more than 100 avian enthusiasts from places as far away as Japan.
  • Christina Giordano, a Marco Island resident and bird lover, has put together a video trilogy,  which showcases video and photographs of companion parrots and birds sent to her from over 100 avian enthusiasts from places as far away as Japan. Christina plays with Zazu a one year old Blue and Gold Macaw in her aviary.
  • Christina Giordano, a Marco Island resident and bird lover with her one year old Blue and Gold Macaw named zazu. Christina has put together a video trilogy, which showcases video and photographs of companion parrots and birds sent to her from over 100 avian enthusiasts from places as far away as Japan.
  • Chloe a 10 year old Moluccan Cockatoo plays in the outdoor aviary at Christina Giordano's, Marco Island house. Christina, a bird lover, has put together a video trilogy,  which showcases video and photographs of companion parrots and birds sent to her from over 100 avian enthusiasts from places as far away as Japan.

Christina Giordano, a Marco Island resident and bird lover, has put together a video trilogy, which showcases video and photographs of companion parrots and birds sent to her from over 100 avian enthusiasts from places as far away as Japan. She will be premiering it at an event with all proceeds going to help the birds who have been affected by the oil spill.



Full gallery »Naples fire officials train on oil spill in panhandle

  • Naples Fire Chief Steve McInerny inspects oil boom in an industrial park that has been transitioned to a decontamination site for oil cleanup equipment  in Pensacola Fla., on Wednesday, July 7, 2010. Officials from the Naples Fire Department traveled to the Florida Pan Handle on Tuesday to spend several days observing oil spill cleanup efforts so that they may streamline their own efforts to contain any oil contamination should the spill reach Collier County. Photo by Tristan Spinski
  • From left, Capt. T.C. Scallan, of the Pensacola Fire Department, Battalion Chief Pete DiMaria, and Fire Chief Steve McInerny, both of the Naples Fire Department, talk about the challenges faced by fire officials in regards to the oil spill and cleanup efforts in Pensacola Fla., on Wednesday, July 7, 2010. Officials from the Naples Fire Department traveled to the Florida Pan Handle on Tuesday to spend several days observing oil spill cleanup efforts so that they may streamline their own efforts to contain any oil contamination should the spill reach Collier County. Photo by Tristan Spinski
  • Pensacola Fire Marshall David Allen, left, and Lt. Philip Hoffman, center, greet Naples Fire Department Chief Steve McInerny, right, in Pensacola Fla., on Wednesday, July 7, 2010. Officials from the Naples Fire Department traveled to the Florida Pan Handle on Tuesday to spend several days observing oil spill cleanup efforts so that they may streamline their own efforts to contain any oil contamination should the spill reach Collier County. Photo by Tristan Spinski
  • From left, Capt. T.C. Scallan, of the Pensacola Fire Department, Battalion Chief Pete DiMaria, and Fire Chief Steve McInerny, both of the Naples Fire Department, talk about the challenges faced by fire officials in regards to the oil spill and cleanup efforts in Pensacola Fla., on Wednesday, July 7, 2010. Officials from the Naples Fire Department traveled to the Florida Pan Handle on Tuesday to spend several days observing oil spill cleanup efforts so that they may streamline their own efforts to contain any oil contamination should the spill reach Collier County. Photo by Tristan Spinski
  • Battalion Chief Pete DiMaria, second from left, Fire Chief Steve McInerny, third from left, both of the Naples Fire Department, talk with Capt. T.C. Scallan, left and Fire Marshall David Allen, right, both from the Pensacola Fire Department, about the challenges faced by fire officials in regards to the oil spill and cleanup efforts in Pensacola Fla., on Wednesday, July 7, 2010. Officials from the Naples Fire Department traveled to the Florida Pan Handle on Tuesday to spend several days observing oil spill cleanup efforts so that they may streamline their own efforts to contain any oil contamination should the spill reach Collier County. Photo by Tristan Spinski
  • Battalion Chief Pete DiMaria, second from left, Fire Chief Steve McInerny, third from left, both of the Naples Fire Department, talk with Capt. T.C. Scallan, left and Fire Marshall David Allen, right, both from the Pensacola Fire Department, about the challenges faced by fire officials in regards to the oil spill and cleanup efforts in Pensacola Fla., on Wednesday, July 7, 2010. Officials from the Naples Fire Department traveled to the Florida Pan Handle on Tuesday to spend several days observing oil spill cleanup efforts so that they may streamline their own efforts to contain any oil contamination should the spill reach Collier County. Photo by Tristan Spinski


Full gallery »Commercial fishermen warned of oil spill spin

  • Marine biologist Riki Ott shares her experiences from being in Alaska during the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill with about 50 fishermen at the Everglades City Community Center on Thursday to help them as they prepare should BP's Deepwater Horizon oil spill reach Southwest Florida.
  • Howie Grimm, owner of Grimm's Stonecrab Inc., Everglades City, opens up a presentation by marine biologist Riki Ott at the Everglades City Community Center on Thursday with a prayer for the families of the men who lost their lives on the Deepwater Horizon oil rig.
  • Fishermen and people in related industries gather at the Everglades City Community Center on Thursday to learn about the possible effects of the BP Deepwater Horizon spill from marine biologist Riki Ott, an expert of the 1989 Exxon Valdez spill in Alaska.
  • Riki Ott
  • Howie Grimm, owner of Grimm's Stonecrab Inc., Everglades City, introduces guest speaker and marine biologist Riki Ott to a crowd of about 50 commercial fishermen at the Everglades City Community Center on Thursday. Grimm said he wanted to prepared for the possible effects of BP's Deepwater Horizon oil spill just in case the odds of it coming to Southwest Florida waters were to change.
  • Riki Ott

The experience in Alaska following Exxon Valdez may foreshadow Florida's upcoming experiences with BP during the ongoing Deepwater Horizon oil spill, marine biologist Riki Ott warns about 50 commercial fishermen at the Everglades City Community Center on Thursday.



Full gallery »BP opens claims office in Naples

  • Form left, Van Snider a claims agent brought in by BP, works with Lee Overman a local commercial fisherman to fill out paperwork in the recently opened BP Naples claims office.  The office that is open seven days a week from 8 am to 6 p.m has been open for nearly a week has received dozens of claims by effected Naples residents.  Staff/ Manuel Martinez
  • Signs hang up on the window of the recently opened BP East Naples office giving people information about hours of operation and claims. The office that is open seven days a week from 8 am to 6 p.m has been open for nearly a week and has received dozens of claims by effected Naples residents.  Staff/ Manuel Martinez
  • Form right, Ernest McLean a claims agent brought in by BP, works with Johnny Brown a local commercial fisherman to fill out paperwork in the recently opened BP Naples claims office.  The office that is open seven days a week from 8 am to 6 p.m has been open for nearly a week has received dozens of claims by effected Naples residents.  Staff/ Manuel Martinez
  • Claims agents sit in the recently opened BP East Naples office. The office that is open seven days a week from 8 am to 6 p.m has been open for nearly a week and has received dozens of claims by effected Naples residents.  Staff/ Manuel Martinez


Full gallery »President tours spill as oil execs appear on Capitol Hill

  • President Barack Obama speaks to military personnel at Naval Air Station Pensacola's Naval Air Technical Training Center in Pensacola, Fla., Tuesday, June 15, 2010, after his visit to the Gulf Coast region affected by the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
  • Bystanders watch the motorcade carrying President Barack Obama and Florida Gov. Charlie Crist along Casino Beach on Pensacola Beach, Fla., Tuesday, June 15, 2010, as they visited the Gulf Coast region affected by the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
  • President Barack Obama tours the Theodore Staging Facility with Alabama Gov. Bob Riley, seated rear right, and National Incident Commander Adm. Thad Allen, rear left, in Theodore, Ala., as he visits the Gulf Coast region affected by the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill Monday, June 14, 2010. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
  • A natural gas rig is seen at rear as President Barack Obama, third from left, takes a ferry from Dauphin Island, Ala., to Fort Morgan, Ala., as he visits the Gulf Coast region affected by the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill Monday, June 14, 2010. From left, National Incident Commander Adm. Thad Allen; Mayor of Dauphin Island Jeff Collier; Obama; Mayor  of Gulf Shores Robert Craft; Alabama Gov. Bob Riley; and senior adviser Valerie Jarrett. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
  • President Barack Obama and Florida Gov. Charlie Crist walk along Casino Beach on Pensacola Beach, Fla., Tuesday, June 15, 2010, as they visited the Gulf Coast region affected by the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
  • President Barack Obama and Florida Gov. Charlie Crist walk along Casino Beach on Pensacola Beach, Fla., Tuesday, June 15, 2010, as he visited the Gulf Coast region affected by the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)


Full gallery »Oil Spill in the Gulf: June 10, 2010

  • Workers remove containment boom from water contaminated by oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, Thursday, June 10, 2010, in Bay Barbeau near Chauvin, La. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
  • Absorbent boom collects oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, Thursday, June 10, 2010, in the Bay Barbeau marshlands near  Chauvin, La.. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
  • Workers remove containment boom from water contaminated by oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, Thursday, June 10, 2010, in Bay Barbeau near Chauvin, La.. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
  • Workers remove containment boom from water contaminated by oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, Thursday, June 10, 2010, in Bay Barbeau near Chauvin, La.. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
  • Absorbent boom collects oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, Thursday, June 10, 2010, in the Bay Barbeau marshlands near  Chauvin, La. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
  • Workers replace absorbent boom collecting oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, Thursday, June 10, 2010, in the Bay Barbeau marshland near Chauvin, La.. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

Photos of the Gulf of Mexico oil cleanup and President Obama's meeting regarding the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill on Thursday, June 10.



Full gallery »Oil spill candlelight demonstrations

  • Bonita Springs resident Marilyn Anderson displays an oil-stained BP logo outside the South County Regional Library during a candle light vigil regarding the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on Tuesday, June 8, 2010 in Estero. The demonstration was mirrored in over 200 other locations in the U.S. marking the 50th day of the  environmental disaster in the Gulf of Mexico. David Albers/Staff
  • Eleven-year-old Matthew Decker, of Fort Myers, joins 20 other demonstrators outside the South County Regional Library for a candle light vigil regarding the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on Tuesday, June 8, 2010 in Estero. The demonstration was mirrored in over 200 other locations in the U.S. marking the 50th day of the  environmental disaster in the Gulf of Mexico. David Albers/Staff
  • Tony Backos, of Naples, lights the candles of his fellow demonstrators outside the South County Regional Library during a candle light vigil regarding the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on Tuesday, June 8, 2010 in Estero. The demonstration was mirrored in over 200 other locations in the U.S. marking the 50th day of the  environmental disaster in the Gulf of Mexico. David Albers/Staff
  • Twenty people demonstrate outside the South County Regional Library during a candle light vigil regarding the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on Tuesday, June 8, 2010 in Estero. The demonstration was mirrored in over 200 other locations in the U.S. marking the 50th day of the  environmental disaster in the Gulf of Mexico. David Albers/Staff
  • Fort Myers resident David Camps, center, demonstrates outside the South County Regional Library during a candle light vigil regarding the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on Tuesday, June 8, 2010 in Estero. The demonstration was mirrored in over 200 other locations in the U.S. marking the 50th day of the  environmental disaster in the Gulf of Mexico. David Albers/Staff
  • Emergency Oil Spill Vigil near Vanderbilt Beach Tuesday. A summer downpour scared some off, but to area residents attended the event at the Palm Beach Pizzeria after plans for a beach side vigil were scrapped due to the weather. About 20 people attended each of the events, which were among hundreds MoveOn.org helped put together across the country to demand an end to the U.S. dependence on oil and a transition to clean energy.


Full gallery »DEP samples water, sand ahead of oil contamination

  • From left, Jeffrey Carter, a stewardship coordinator with the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), Andrew Emerson, a marine patrol officer with the Naples Police Department, Susan Denham, a sea grass researcher with the DEP, and Katie Laakkonen, an environmental specialist with the City of Naples Division of Natural Resources, depart from the City Dock in Naples to take water and sediment samples at Gordon's Pass in Naples on Tuesday, June 8, 2010. Officials from the Department of Environmental Protection and the City of Naples Division of Natural Resources spent part of Tuesday afternoon collecting water and sediment samples to document the current lack of oil contamination should the oil slick from the Deep Water Horizon disaster reach southwest Florida. Photo by Tristan Spinski
  • Susan Denham, a sea grass researcher with the Department of Environmental Protection, loads supplies onto a boat at the City Dock in Naples before heading to Gordon's Pass to take water and sediment samples on Tuesday, June 8, 2010. Officials from the Department of Environmental Protection and the City of Naples Division of Natural Resources spent part of Tuesday afternoon collecting water and sediment samples to document the current lack of oil contamination should the oil slick from the Deep Water Horizon disaster reach southwest Florida. Photo by Tristan Spinski
  • Susan Denham, a sea grass researcher with the Department of Environmental Protection, loads supplies onto a boat at the City Dock in Naples before heading to Gordon's Pass to take water and sediment samples on Tuesday, June 8, 2010. Officials from the Department of Environmental Protection and the City of Naples Division of Natural Resources spent part of Tuesday afternoon collecting water and sediment samples to document the current lack of oil contamination should the oil slick from the Deep Water Horizon disaster reach southwest Florida. Photo by Tristan Spinski
  • Susan Denham, a sea grass researcher with the Department of Environmental Protection, takes water and sediment samples at Gordon's Pass in Naples on Tuesday, June 8, 2010. Officials from the Department of Environmental Protection and the City of Naples Division of Natural Resources spent part of Tuesday afternoon collecting water and sediment samples to document the current lack of oil contamination should the oil slick from the Deep Water Horizon disaster reach southwest Florida. Photo by Tristan Spinski
  • Susan Denham, a sea grass researcher with the Department of Environmental Protection, takes water and sediment samples at Gordon's Pass in Naples on Tuesday, June 8, 2010. Officials from the Department of Environmental Protection and the City of Naples Division of Natural Resources spent part of Tuesday afternoon collecting water and sediment samples to document the current lack of oil contamination should the oil slick from the Deep Water Horizon disaster reach southwest Florida. Photo by Tristan Spinski
  • Susan Denham, a sea grass researcher with the Department of Environmental Protection, takes water and sediment samples at Gordon's Pass in Naples on Tuesday, June 8, 2010. Officials from the Department of Environmental Protection and the City of Naples Division of Natural Resources spent part of Tuesday afternoon collecting water and sediment samples to document the current lack of oil contamination should the oil slick from the Deep Water Horizon disaster reach southwest Florida. Photo by Tristan Spinski


Full gallery »Shrimping on Fort Myers Beach

  • Fort Myers Beach resident David Newcomb, 50, unloads roughly 25,000 pounds of shrimp from the High Plains Drifter shrimp boat at the Trico Shrimp Company on Wednesday, May 26, 2010, in Fort Myers Beach. With the shrimping and fishing industry balanced on tight budgets, local fishermen and shrimpers are keeping a close eye on the Deep Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Any damage to the gulf could have a ripple effect on the region's entire seafood industry. David Albers/Staff
  • Employees sort pink shrimp from the Gulf of Mexico at the Beach Seafood Market in the company's factory on Wednesday, May 26, 2010 in Fort Myers Beach. With the shrimping and fishing industry balanced on tight budgets, local fishermen and shrimpers are keeping a close eye on the Deep Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Any damage to the gulf could have a ripple effect on the region's entire seafood industry. David Albers/Staff
  • Fort Myers native Justin Mahaffey, 24, prepares to unload roughly 25,000 pounds of shrimp caught during a 16-day trip in the Gulf of Mexico on Wednesday, May 26, 2010, in Fort Myers Beach. With the shrimping and fishing industry balanced on tight budgets, local fishermen and shrimpers are keeping a close eye on the Deep Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Any damage to the gulf could have a ripple effect on the region's entire seafood industry. David Albers/Staff
  • Fort Myers resident Debbie Green welcomes home her shrimp boat captain husband, Blaine Green, on the couples' 31st anniversary on Wednesday, May 26, 2010, in Fort Myers Beach. With the shrimping and fishing industry balanced on tight budgets, local fishermen and shrimpers are keeping a close eye on the Deep Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Any damage to the gulf could have a ripple effect on the region's entire seafood industry. David Albers/Staff
  • Fort Myers resident Blaine Green, captain of the High Plains Drifter, returns from a 16-day trip with roughly 25,000 pounds of shrimp as he unloads his catch at the Trico Shrimp Company on Wednesday, May 26, 2010, in Fort Myers Beach. With the shrimping and fishing industry balanced on tight budgets, local fishermen and shrimpers are keeping a close eye on the Deep Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Any damage to the gulf could have a ripple effect on the region's entire seafood industry. David Albers/Staff
  • Fort Myers native Justin Mahaffey, 24, prepares to unload roughly 25,000 pounds of shrimp caught during a 16-day trip in the Gulf of Mexico on Wednesday, May 26, 2010, in Fort Myers Beach. With the shrimping and fishing industry balanced on tight budgets, local fishermen and shrimpers are keeping a close eye on the Deep Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Any damage to the gulf could have a ripple effect on the region's entire seafood industry. David Albers/Staff

With the shrimping and fishing industry balanced on tight budgets, local fishermen and shrimpers are keeping a close eye on the Deep Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Any damage to the gulf could have a ripple effect on the region's entire seafood industry.



Full gallery »Commercial fishing industry threatened by oil spill

  • Nick Manndude, a commercial fisherman out of Key West, hauls fresh-catch frozen tuna back to his car. Stock Island, just east of Key West, is home to hundreds of boats that make their living fishing the waters off the Keys. Fishermen are eyeing the oil spill nervously, waiting for news of its migration. It has forced shrimpers and fishermen out of their usual fishing grounds along the northern Gulf Coast and into the waters south of the Keys.
  • Jeremy Nicholas fishes for grunt and snapper at Fish Busterz Marina on Stock Island. Jeremy a 76 year old retired fisherman use to be a shrimper on vessels similar to the ones he now fishes near.  Stock Island just North of Key West is home to hundreds of boats that make their living fishing the waters off the Keys. The Fisherman who make their living in these waters are eyeing the oil spill nervously, waiting for news of its migration.  It has forced shrimpers and fisherman out of their usual fishing grounds along the Northern Gulf Coast and into the waters South of the Keys. Photographed on May 23 2010. Staff/ Manuel
  • From left, Norel Tavieso and Josef Roman filet fresh mahi-mahi at Fish Busterz Marina on Stock Island.  Stock Island just North of Key West is home to hundreds of boats that make their living fishing the waters off the Keys. The Fisherman who make their living in these waters are eyeing the oil spill nervously, waiting for news of its migration.  It has forced shrimpers and fisherman out of their usual fishing grounds along the Northern Gulf Coast and into the waters South of the Keys. Photographed on May 23 2010. Staff/ Manuel
  • From Left, Nick Manndude and Brian Williams both commercial fisherman out of the Key West hall fresh catch frozen tuna back to the car.  Stock Island just North of Key West is home to hundreds of boats that make their living fishing the waters off the Keys. The Fisherman who make their living in these waters are eyeing the oil spill nervously, waiting for news of its migration.  It has forced shrimpers and fisherman out of their usual fishing grounds along the Northern Gulf Coast and into the waters South of the Keys. Photographed on May 23 2010. Staff/ Manuel
  • Norel Tavieso fills baskets full of ice, used to pack the fresh fish at Fish Busterz on Stock Island.  Stock Island just North of Key West is home to hundreds of boats that make their living fishing the waters off the Keys. The Fisherman who make their living in these waters are eyeing the oil spill nervously, waiting for news of its migration.  It has forced shrimpers and fisherman out of their usual fishing grounds along the Northern Gulf Coast and into the waters South of the Keys. Photographed on May 23 2010. Staff/ Manuel
  • Inee Johannesson secures the stacks of lobster traps in preparation for Keys lobster season beginning in August. The owner Adam Desson, has spent nearly 30,00 dollars for the 2,000 traps that surround Inee, he is very concerned that the spill could quite easily devastate his business and put a halt on the whole fishing community. Stock Island just North of Key West is home to hundreds of boats that make their living fishing the waters off the Keys. The Fisherman who make their living in these waters are eyeing the oil spill nervously, waiting for news of its migration.  It has forced shrimpers and fisherman out of their usual fishing grounds along the Northern Gulf Coast and into the waters South of the Keys. Photographed on May 23 2010. Staff/ Manuel


Full gallery »Divers concerned in the Keys

  • Dive Master and First Mate Eric Grandcourt assists Denny Carvajal onto the boat after his first dive of the day. Some 17 divers and 4 master divers were aboard the Sea Eagle, a dive boat owned by Captain's Corner, the longest running dive shop in Old Town Key West. Manuel Martinez/Staff
  • Captain Roy Smith helps Danny Carvajal into the water on their first dive of the day. Seventeen divers and four master divers were aboard the Sea Eagle. The divers visited The USNS General Hoyt S.Vandenberg, a sunken vessel. Manuel Martinez/Staff
  • Captain Roy Smith gives the divers aboard the Sea Eagle a briefing on the rules of the boat and information about the shipwreck dive they are about to experience. There were 17 divers and four master divers aboard the Sea Eagle, a dive boat owned by Captain's Corner, the longest running dive shop in Old Town Key West. The divers visited The USNS General Hoyt S.Vandenberg, resting 150 feet below the surface and rising nearly 40 feet above the ocean floor. The captain and crew are concerned that if the spill reaches the Keys, it could devastate their business and drive divers to other areas of Florida. Manuel Martinez/Staff
  • Dive Master and First Mate Eric Grandcourt assists divers back onto the boat after their first dive of the day. The divers were aboard the Sea Eagle, a dive boat owned by Captain's Corner, the longest running dive shop in Old Town Key West. Manuel Martinez/Staff
  • Captain Roy Smith of the Sea Eagle navigates the boat shipwreck dive off the coast of the Florida Keys.  Divers visited The USNS General Hoyt S.Vandenberg, a sunken boat resting 150 feet below the surface and rising nearly 40 feet above the ocean floor. Manuel Martinez/Staff
  • Lena Wray gets instruction on prepping her gear, before her first dive of the day, from Tony Casserly, a dive master on the Sea Eagle. She is working on getting her advanced certification and was concerned about getting her classes done early in case the spill reached the Keys.  The captain and crew are concerned that if the spill reaches the key it could devastate their business and drive divers to other areas of Florida. Manuel Martinez/Staff

Coral reefs off the Keys provide diverse and important habitat for hundreds of thousands of marine species, and one of those reefs is America’s only great barrier reef – the third largest in the world.



Full gallery »Key West coral enthusiasts worried about oil spill

  • Lena Wray gets instruction on prepping her gear, before her first dive of the day, from Tony Casserly, a dive master on the Sea Eagle. She is working on getting her advanced certification and was concerned about getting her classes done early in case the spill reached the Keys.  The captain and crew are concerned that if the spill reaches the key it could devastate their business and drive divers to other areas of Florida. Manuel Martinez/Staff
  • Captain Roy Smith gives the divers aboard the Sea Eagle a briefing on the rules of the boat and information about the shipwreck dive they are about to experience. There were 17 divers and four master divers aboard the Sea Eagle, a dive boat owned by Captain's Corner, the longest running dive shop in Old Town Key West. The divers visited The USNS General Hoyt S.Vandenberg, resting 150 feet below the surface and rising nearly 40 feet above the ocean floor. The captain and crew are concerned that if the spill reaches the Keys, it could devastate their business and drive divers to other areas of Florida. Manuel Martinez/Staff
  • Dive Master and First Mate Eric Grandcourt assists Denny Carvajal onto the boat after his first dive of the day. Some 17 divers and 4 master divers were aboard the Sea Eagle, a dive boat owned by Captain's Corner, the longest running dive shop in Old Town Key West. Manuel Martinez/Staff
  • Captain Roy Smith helps Danny Carvajal into the water on their first dive of the day. Seventeen divers and four master divers were aboard the Sea Eagle. The divers visited The USNS General Hoyt S.Vandenberg, a sunken vessel. Manuel Martinez/Staff
  • Captain Roy Smith of the Sea Eagle navigates the boat shipwreck dive off the coast of the Florida Keys.  Divers visited The USNS General Hoyt S.Vandenberg, a sunken boat resting 150 feet below the surface and rising nearly 40 feet above the ocean floor. Manuel Martinez/Staff
  • Dive Master and First Mate Eric Grandcourt assists divers back onto the boat after their first dive of the day. The divers were aboard the Sea Eagle, a dive boat owned by Captain's Corner, the longest running dive shop in Old Town Key West. Manuel Martinez/Staff

Just off Key West is a treasure trove, but it's not the X-marks-the-spot kind of treasure. Coral reefs off the Keys provide diverse and important habitat for hundreds of thousands of marine creatures, and one of them is America's only great barrier reef – the third largest in the world.



Full gallery »Cleanup in the Florida Keys

  • Rob Stevens moves a truck tire to shore after picking it up during a beach clean up organized by the Nature Conservancy of Florida. Rob and Allison Hepler were planning on going canoeing and saw this as an opportunity to also give back to the community.  Volunteers and employees of the of the Nature Conservancy of Florida managed to collect 1,280 pounds of garbage that filled a flat bed truck after three hours of the cleanup. The volunteers cleaned the entire 1.5 miles of the John Pescatello Torchwood Hammock Preserve shoreline.   Trash cleanup along the mangroves and shores insures that trash does not become hazardous material if the oil were to reach the shore.  Photographed on May 22 2010. Manuel Martinez/Staff
  • Volunteers and employees of the of the Nature Conservancy of Florida managed to collect 1,280 pounds of garbage that filled a flat bed truck after three hours of the cleanup. The volunteers cleaned the entire 1.5 miles of the John Pescatello Torchwood Hammock Preserve shoreline.   Trash cleanup along the mangroves and shores insures that trash does not become hazardous material if the oil were to reach the shore.  Photographed on May 22 2010. Manuel Martinez/Staff
  • From Left, Shirley Gun hands Elena Spottswood bags filled with garbage pick up on the shores of the John Pescatello Torchwood Hammock Preserve during a beach cleanup organized by the Nature Conservancy. Both women are full time residents of the Keys.  Volunteers and employees of the of the Nature Conservancy of Florida managed to collect 1,280 pounds of garbage that filled a flatbed truck after three hours of the cleanup. The volunteers cleaned the entire 1.5 miles of the John Pescatello Torchwood Hammock Preserve shoreline.   Trash cleaned up along the mangroves and shores insures that trash does not become hazardous material if the oil were to reach the shore.  Photographed on May 22 2010. Manuel Martinez/Staff
  • Volunteers gathered for a briefing given by Chris Bergh director of the Nature Conservancy before heading out on kayaks and canoes for a beach cleanup. Volunteers and employees of the of the Nature Conservancy of Florida managed to collect 1,280 pounds of garbage that filled a flatbed truck after three hours of the cleanup. The volunteers cleaned the entire 1.5 miles of the John Pescatello Torchwood Hammock Preserve shoreline.   Trash cleaned up along the mangroves and shores insures that trash does not become hazardous material if the oil were to reach the shore.  Photographed on May 22 2010. Manuel Martinez/Staff
  • Rob Stevens carries a beach chair and a bag full of garbage to shore during a beach cleanup organized by the Nature Conservancy of Florida. Rob was planning on going canoeing and saw this as an opportunity to also give back to the community. Volunteers and employees of the of the Nature Conservancy of Florida managed to collect 1,280 pounds of garbage that filled a flatbed truck after three hours of the cleanup. The volunteers cleaned the entire 1.5 miles of the John Pescatello Torchwood Hammock Preserve shoreline. Trash cleaned up along the mangroves and shores insures that trash does not become hazardous material if the oil were to reach the shore.  Photographed on May 22 2010. Manuel Martinez/Staff
  • Rob Stevens packs a bag full of garbage into his canoe during a beach clean up organized by the Nature Conservancy of Florida. Rob was planning on going canoeing and saw this as an opportunity to also give back to the community.  Volunteers and employees of the of the Nature Conservancy of Florida managed to collect 1,280 pounds of garbage that filled a flat bed truck after three hours of the cleanup. The volunteers cleaned the entire 1.5 miles of the John Pescatello Torchwood Hammock Preserve shoreline.   Trash cleanup along the mangroves and shores insures that trash does not become hazardous material if the oil were to reach the shore.  Photographed on May 22 2010. Manuel Martinez/Staff

Volunteers gathered Saturday with kayaks and canoes at Little Torch Key, about 30 miles northeast of Key West, for a pre-oil shoreline cleanup, just in case the spill makes its way to the Keys.



Full gallery »AP oil cleanup

  • Officials suggest cleanup may do more harm than oil


Full gallery »Keys helpers prepare for oil spill

  • Andy Dobrowolski, a sea turtle rehabilitation specialist at the Turtle Hospital in Marathon Key, relocates Bender, a large Kemp's Ridley turtle undergoing rehabilitation from a smaller sick tank to the 100,000-gallon tidal pool at the center. The Turtle Hospital is the only state-certified veterinary hospital in the world for sea turtles and while the loggerhead turtle is not on the endangered list several environmental organizations are fighting to get them added. The center is taking some precautionary measures to prepare for the spill by ensuring the facility is ready for turtle relocation and that supplies are well-stocked in case of an emergency. Photographed on May 21 2010. Manuel Martinez/Staff
  • Andy Dobrowolski, a sea turtle rehabilitation specialist at the Turtle Hospital in Marathon Key, injects a squid with a cough suppressant that will be fed to one of the loggerhead turtles undergoing rehabilitation at the center. The Turtle Hospital is the only state-certified veterinary hospital in the world for sea turtles and while the loggerhead turtle isn't on the endangered list, several environmental organizations are fighting to get them added. Photographed on May 21 2010. Manuel Martinez/Staff
  • Andy Dobrowolski, a sea turtle rehabilitation specialist at the Turtle Hospital in Marathon Key, feeds squid to one of the loggerhead turtles undergoing rehabilitation at the center. The turtle hospital is the only state-certified veterinary hospital in the world for sea turtles and while the loggerhead turtle is not on the endangered list several environmental organizations are fighting to get them added. The center is taking some precautionary measures to prepare for the spill by ensuring the facility is ready for turtle relocation and that supplies are well-stocked in case of an emergency. Photographed on May 21 2010. Manuel Martinez/Staff
  • David Brigham, an employee at the Florida Keys Wild Bird Center, feeds the pelicans in one of several enclosures in the sanctuary located in Tavernier, Fla. The Florida Keys Wild Bird Center houses and rehabilitates hundreds of rescued birds from the Keys and surrounding areas with the use of a hospital and sanctuary. The hospital and sanctuary has a fully certified staff capable and prepared for an influx of birds if the spill reaches the Florida Keys shores. Photographed on May 21 2010. Manuel Martinez/Staff
  • A brown pelican with an outstretched neck sits on the shore next to the Florida Keys Wild Bird Center in Tavernier, Fla. The Florida Keys Wild Bird Center houses and rehabilitates hundreds of rescued birds from the Keys and surrounding areas with the use of a hospital and sanctuary. Photographed on May 21 2010. Manuel Martinez/Staff
  • Vered Nograd, hospital director for the Florida Keys Wild Bird Center, handles a mourning dove at the hospital in Tavernier.  The smaller birds are often knocked out of trees due to pruning in preparation for hurricane season. The hospital has a fully certified staff capable and prepared for an influx of birds if the spill reaches the Florida Keys shores. The Florida Keys Wild Bird Center houses and rehabilitates hundreds of rescued birds from the Keys and surrounding areas with the use of a hospital and sanctuary. Photographed on May 21, 2010. Manuel Martinez/Staff

Florida Keys waters are safe from oil for now, but no one knows for sure what will happen in the coming days, so wildlife rehabilitators are preparing just in case the spill moves their way.



Full gallery »Oil Spill in the Gulf: May 19

  • FILE -In this Tuesday, May 4, 2010 file photo, a Brown Pelican flies past a tangled oil retention boom on New Harbor Islands in the Gulf of Mexico. (AP Photo/Dave Martin, File)
  • Crews collect sand samples at Fort Zachary Taylor State Park beach in Key West  Fla.,Tuesday May 17, 2010.  Twenty tar balls were found in Key West on Monday and are being analyzed to see if they came from the Deepwater oil spill. (AP Photo/The Citizen, Rob O'Neal)
  • Oil is seen on a beach at the mouth of the Mississippi River south of Venice, La. Tuesday, May 18, 2010. Oil from last month's Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion in the Gulf of Mexico has started drifting ashore along the Louisiana coast. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)
  • Crews crews take sand samples as sunbathers rest on Fort Zachary Taylor State Park beach in Key West Fla., Tuesday May 17, 2010.  Twenty tar balls were found in Key West on Monday and are being analyzed to see if they came from the Deepwater oil spill. (AP Photo/The Citizen, Rob O'Neal)
  • A shrimp boat motors through a ribbon of oil during cleanup operations in the Gulf of Mexico off the mouth of the Mississippi River south of Venice, La. Tuesday, May 18, 2010. Oil from last month's Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion in the Gulf of Mexico has started drifting ashore along the Louisiana coast.  (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)
  • A shrimp boat motors through a ribbon of oil during cleanup operations in the Gulf of Mexico off the mouth of the Mississippi River south of Venice, La. Tuesday, May 18, 2010. Oil from last month's Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion in the Gulf of Mexico has started drifting ashore along the Louisiana coast.  (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)


Full gallery »Oil spill in the Gulf

  • A ship's wake cuts through a pattern of oil near the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico Monday, May 17, 2010. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)
  • Gas is burned off on a ship collecting oil from a mile-deep oil leak at the site of an oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico Monday, May 17, 2010. A relief well to relieve pressure on the leak caused by the explosion and sinking of the Deepwater Horizon oil platform is seen at upper left.  (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)
  • Protective booms surround an island near mouth of the Mississippi River south of Venice, La. from an oil spill Monday, May 17, 2010. The oil is a result of the  explosion of the Deepwater Horizon drilling platform in the Gulf of Mexico nearly a month ago. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)
  • Protective booms surround islands near mouth of the Mississippi River south of Venice, La. from an oil spill Monday, May 17, 2010. The oil is a result of the  explosion of the Deepwater Horizon drilling platform in the Gulf of Mexico nearly a month ago. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)
  • A vessel floats among oil sheen near the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico Monday, May 17, 2010. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)
  • Vessels collect oil near the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico Monday, May 17, 2010. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)



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