Photos by Cary Edmondson

  • Alex Lopez, 2, plays with his toy truck, while his brother Angel, 1, watches from the steps of the family’s mobile home at the Glade Haven park in Bonita Springs. Residents have to look for other housing options because of plans by Eagle Bay LLC to replace the park with a townhouse community.
  • Fourth grader Mallorie Gant, 11, left, works on an making a paper mache 'bug' during an art class at Pinewoods Elementary School in Estero last week. The school recently decorated their front fence with environmentally sound clay castings of plants and animals native to Florida in celebration of Earth Day.
  • Almost too drained to even lay sheets down on her cot,  Alejandra Garza, 10, raised her hands over her head as if to support the notion that she emotionally drained from the entire situation.
  • Cafe of Life volunteer Liz Gordee, left, laughs while helping set up a table of food with Lucy Wahlberg at the park, located next to the Bonita Springs Community Center, on Friday morning. Volunteers from the Cafe of Life, who are currently allowed to use the community center two days a week to feed the homeless, will address the Bonita Springs City Council on June 6 in hopes of receiving permission to serve out of the center five days a week.
  • Grant Lundberg, 67, follows through on his tee shot on the second hole while golfing at the Bonita Springs Golf and Country Club Friday morning. The golf club, which is the oldest operating golf course in Bonita Springs, will be closing down this week and turning nine of their holes into an executive golf course.
  • Grant Lundberg, 67, reacts to his chip shot while golfing at the Bonita Springs Golf and Country Club Friday morning. The golf club, which is the oldest operating golf course in Bonita Springs, will be closing down this week and turning nine of their holes into an executive golf course.
  • Bob Martin, 80, uses some body english after hitting a chip shot near the hole while golfing at the Bonita Springs Golf and Country Club Friday morning. The golf club, which is the oldest operating golf course in Bonita Springs, will be closing down this week and turning nine of their holes into an executive golf course.
  • Grant Lundberg, 67, pumps his fist after hitting a chip shot near the hole while golfing at the Bonita Springs Golf and Country Club Friday morning. The golf club, which is the oldest operating golf course in Bonita Springs, will be closing down this week and turning nine of their holes into an executive golf course.
  • Margaret Williams accepts the trophy for her win at the Lee County spelling competition on March 23. She was stunned, she says. More accurately: “I had the frying-pan-to-the-face look.”
  • Capt. Jim McLaughlin places his captain’s hat on his wife Debi shortly after his plane landed at Southwest Florida International Airport on Friday afternoon. McLaughlin, who has lived in Naples for about one year, retired from Continental Airlines after 22 years. A dozen relatives and friends accompanied McLaughlin on his final flight.
  • The Continental Airlines plane flown by retiring Capt. Jim McLaughlin is showered by water from nearby fire trucks at Southwest Florida International Airport on Friday afternoon in recognition of McLaughlin’s final flight.
  • A group of Pinewoods Elementary School teachers and employees, from bottom left to right, Tami Black, Julie Smith, Denise Carlin, Monieg Bagdasarian and Barbara Hardee, celebrate after defeating the fifth-graders from their school 13-7 in a kickball game Thursday, the last day of school in Lee County.
  • A group of Pinewoods Elementary School teachers and employees took on a group of fifth-graders from their school in a kickball game Thursday, the last day of school in Lee County.
  • A group of Pinewoods Elementary School teachers and employees took on a group of fifth-graders from their school in a kickball game Thursday, the last day of school in Lee County.
  • A group of Pinewoods Elementary School teachers and employees took on a group of fifth-graders from their school in a kickball game Thursday, the last day of school in Lee County.
  • A group of Pinewoods Elementary School teachers and employees took on a group of fifth-graders from their school in a kickball game Thursday, the last day of school in Lee County.
  • A group of Pinewoods Elementary School teachers and employees took on a group of fifth-graders from their school in a kickball game Thursday, the last day of school in Lee County.
  • A group of Pinewoods Elementary School teachers and employees took on a group of fifth-graders from their school in a kickball game Thursday, the last day of school in Lee County.
  • A group of Pinewoods Elementary School teachers and employees took on a group of fifth-graders from their school in a kickball game Thursday, the last day of school in Lee County.
  • Migel Jimenez, 5, plays in his front yard as a light rain falls in Bonita Springs on Thursday. Migel had finished his last day of kindergarten at Bonita Springs Elementary earlier in the day and was out playing with his twin brother, Angel.
  • Lee County Commissioner Ray Judah, right, pats Bonita Springs Public Works employee Daryl Walk on the shoulder during the groundbreaking ceremony for the Three Oaks Parkway South extension while Bonita Springs City Councilwoman Martha Simons, left, looks on.
  • Lee County coordinator for personnel services Shannon Smith, left, talks with Jessica Whitaker, middle, about job possibilities in the Lee County School District during a job fair at the Harborside Event Center in Fort Myers on Wednesday afternoon. Lee County schools representatives were recruiting people to work in various areas, such as food service and bus drivers.
  • More scenes from the little-known sport of dressage, also referred to as “horse ballet.” The sport involves training a rider and horse to perform intricate steps and movements.
  • Marco Island dressage trainer Robert Braren, right, guides Patricia Klees in an element of dressage. Braren, a medal winner in German and American competitions, trains dressage riders in Southwest Florida, but his dream to to participate in the Olympics.
  • More scenes from the little-known sport of dressage, also referred to as “horse ballet.” The sport involves training a rider and horse to perform intricate steps and movements.
  • After finishing a training session, Patricia Klees, left, watches as dressage trainer Robert Braren rides one of her horses before leaving to his next appointment.
  • More scenes from the little-known sport of dressage, also referred to as “horse ballet.” The sport involves training a rider and horse to perform intricate steps and movements.
  • More scenes from the little-known sport of dressage, also referred to as “horse ballet.” The sport involves training a rider and horse to perform intricate steps and movements.
  • More scenes from the little-known sport of dressage, also referred to as “horse ballet.” The sport involves training a rider and horse to perform intricate steps and movements.
  • More scenes from the little-known sport of dressage, also referred to as “horse ballet.” The sport involves training a rider and horse to perform intricate steps and movements.
  • Mirrors placed in the horse ring help Patricia Klees analyze her form. Dressage, considered more art form than sport by many, is the oldest equestrian sport.
  • More scenes from the little-known sport of dressage, also referred to as “horse ballet.” The sport involves training a rider and horse to perform intricate steps and movements.
  • More scenes from the little-known sport of dressage, also referred to as “horse ballet.” The sport involves training a rider and horse to perform intricate steps and movements.
  • More scenes from the little-known sport of dressage, also referred to as “horse ballet.” The sport involves training a rider and horse to perform intricate steps and movements.
  • Patricia Klees rides in front of a mirror during a training session at her home in Buckingham in east Lee County. Klees is taking lessons for the little-known sport of dressage, also referred to as “horse ballet.” The sport involves training a rider and horse to perform intricate steps and movements.
  • John Stevens, 63, receives a cupcake from Carol Fairfield, right, while undergoing a dialysis treatment at the DaVita Dialysis Center in Bonita Springs. Stevens of Bonita Springs is one of hundreds of people in Southwest Florida who undergo dialysis several times a week.
  • John Bourgoin slices bananas to use as bait in an iguana traps. Bourgoin and several friends are part of a loose ring of Boca Grande residents taking eradication of the exotic invasive lizard into their own hands.
  • While some consider the nonnative lizards to be a great tourist attraction, others believe the iguanas are nothing but pests who demolish gardens, eat bird eggs and nest in attics.
  • An iguana runs across a dirt road near Gasparilla Island State Park. While some consider the exotic lizards a beneficial tourist attraction, others think they're pests that demolish gardens, eat bird eggs and nest in attics.
  • Students and teachers from Charlotte County's Vineland Elementary School walk along the beach at the Gasparilla Island State Park in Boca Grande during a field trip. Since all animals in the park are protected, the iguanas are plentiful.
  • John Bourgoin carries away a caged iguana. Bourgoin, a resident of Boca Grande, sets up several cages each day. He and friends estimate they've captured 200 iguanas since January.
  • While some consider the nonnative lizards to be a great tourist attraction, others believe the iguanas are nothing but pests who demolish gardens, eat bird eggs and nest in attics.
  • A black spinytail iguana hides in a tree at a park in Boca Grande. The increasing iguana population in Boca Grande has reached critical mass, leading Lee County leaders to ask the island's 1,200 residents to pay additional taxes to get the lizard population under control. The number of iguanas in the area is estimated to be well over 10,000.
  • Bonita Springs resident Rick Steinmeyer stands outside the Bonita Springs City Hall with his Mayor of Survey medal. Steinmeyer, who has lived in Bonita Springs for the past 26 years, consistently attends City Council meetings and public hearings for Bonita Springs every week.
  • A message carved into a bench outside an ice cream shop in Boca Grande reads: 'Iguanan hunter. Reasonable rates. Inquire within.' Although the message may be tongue-in-cheek, some residents are paying others to hunt iguanas to reduce the number of invasive lizards.
  • Steve Hayes, 25, chases down his dog, Wilma, while visiting Dog Beach in Bonita Springs on Thursday morning. Hayes, a firefighter in North Naples, named his dog after Hurricane Wilma because Hayes was able to purchase the dog with money from the overtime he worked during the storm.
  • Tucker Murphy, right, looks at his ice cream cone while held by his grandpa, Vanden Catli, shortly after his mother, Nikol Murphy, left, handed it to the youngster inside the Royal Scoop Homemade Ice Cream shop in Bonita Springs on Sunday. The shop gave away free scoops of ice cream to mothers from noon to 10 p.m. in recognition of Mother's Day.
  • Rob Stanfield, center, talks to a group of people about life in the Air Force during Service Academy Day at Estero High School on Saturday morning. Students and parents met with representatives from service academies to talk about application procedures, academy life and career opportunities.
  • A fire helicopter escapes from clouds of smoke after dumping water over a brush fire east of Interstate 75 near Bonita Beach Road Saturday afternoon.
  • A fire helicopter escapes from clouds of smoke after dumping water over a brush fire east of Interstate 75 near Bonita Beach Road Saturday afternoon.

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