Staff »

Melissa Cassutt

Contact: 239-213-6097 | Send Melissa an email

About Melissa Cassutt

Biography

Beat: Bonita Springs city reporter

Started with the Daily News: Oct. 10, 2005

Bio: I realized two crucial things when I moved from Colorado to work at the Daily News. One, the Rocky Mountains played an intricate role in my ability to tell which direction I am driving in. And two, the word "season" takes on a whole new meaning in Florida. Really, it's a sight to behold. A professor of mine at the University of Colorado told me Florida is the best place to be a journalist because no other state fosters such strange stories, and yet, has such nice weather. Which is, of course, fantastic. So when I'm not writing about the growing city of Bonita Springs, I'm making my best attempt at photography, enthusiastically learning the piano (for which I should apologize to my neighbors) or taunting my friends back home who are bundled up in the freezing tundra.

Melissa Cassutt

Position History

RSS Feeds

Recent Work

  • Bonita firefighters collecting some medical waste Published 03/05/2007 at 12:25 a.m.

    The Bonita Springs Fire District wants your medical waste. At least some of it. Rather than have residents toss their needles in the garbage, the district is prepped to collect used sharps containers and hand out new bins. The program, ...

  • Search for Baby Bryan continues, but becoming more difficult Published 03/03/2007 at 12:23 a.m.

    She has missed so much. Gurgles and coos. Smiles. The first time her son held his head up. The point when he could have recognized her face. He’s bigger now — likely a few inches longer, twice his weight. He’s ...

  • Never giving up Published 02/28/2007 at 12:30 a.m.

    Time passes slowly when her fingers are steering a needle through fabric. The stitches hold prayers for a future. She used to pray to see her boys grow up. Now she prays she’ll one day meet her grandchildren. Each square, ...

  • Bonita fire department fleet gets new addition Published 02/25/2007 at 12:24 a.m.

    The boat wasn’t supposed to be a watercraft where people could be treated. It was supposed to be a raft to toss people on until the firefighters could get them to land. It’s inflatable, but stable. It’s quick. It’s been ...

  • Scam artist season has arrived, authorities say Published 02/21/2007 at 12:23 a.m.

    Her roof needs fixing. She doesn’t know she has a problem, but that’s what the contractor says. The roof is in bad shape, and she better tend to it quick. He offered to do it for a reasonable price — ...

  • Weddings are no cakewalk, experts say Published 02/19/2007 at 12:01 a.m.

    Munching squares of cake and sipping plastic champagne flutes, hundreds of brides-to-be hunted for perfection. They're scoping out the latest trends for gowns (ivory is in). They're searching for the tastiest cake (buttercream is out). They're looking for the perfect ...

  • DCF now accepting child and elderly abuse reports online Published 02/18/2007 at 12:21 a.m.

    They already get many of the cases too late. Sometimes it’s deep bruises, sometimes broken bones. Sometimes it’s beyond that. Sometimes the victim is already dead. The Department of Children and Families recently started accepting reports of child and elder ...

  • Former Pa. congressman accused of exposing himself Published 02/15/2007 at 12:19 a.m.

    A former congressman accused of exposing his genitals at a Sanibel Island hotel in January was summoned by the State Attorney’s Office to appear in court. The 20th Judicial Court issued a summons for Joseph Michael McDade, who represented Pennsylvania ...

  • Fire Board votes to lower response goal Published 02/13/2007 at midnight

    The Bonita Springs Fire Board voted Monday night to lower its goal to reaching 85 percent of its calls in six minutes, though commissioners agreed the change wouldn't affect how the fire stations are run.

  • Bonita Springs Fire Station 1 making way for expansion Published 02/13/2007 at midnight

    Clouds of dust wafted from the pile of rubble, slathering waves of gritty film on cars, trucks, people — anything in their path.

View all stories for this staff member.

Features