Lisa Troemner is accused of killing her boyfriend more than three years ago. She faces a charge of second-degree murder. If convicted, she could face up to life in prison. Vonna Keomanyvong/Naples Daily News


Texts messages between a Marco woman and the boyfriend she said she fatally stabbed in self-defense show she was concerned and angered by his alcohol consumption habits. 

Lisa Troemner, 27, faces a charge of second-degree murder in the killing of Trevor Smith, 30, in the Marco Island condo they shared. The couple had been arguing for at least two days leading up to the stabbing, according to the defense.

Troemner's defense attorney, Donald Day, has argued his client was a victim of domestic violence and suffers from battered spouse syndrome. According to Day, Troemner acted in self-defense because she was afraid Smith would kill her during their ongoing arguments.

Jurors on Thursday heard about several sets of text message exchanges between Troemner and Smith. In those messages, Troemner seemed upset about her boyfriend's drinking habits.

In one set of messages, Smith asks Troemner to call him.

"Do not care to call you," she replied. "Leave me alone and enjoy your best love. Alcohol."

In another exchange, Troemner tells Smith she wants the two of them to be healthier and wanted to work with him on improving his eating and drinking habits.

In a text message sent Nov. 25, 2014, a week before the killing, Troemner told Smith she wanted out of the relationship and she didn't like his habits. 

"That's enough for me to be through," she messaged him.

Day asked the state's final rebuttal witness, clinical psychologist and professor Dr. Michael Herkov, whether alcohol abuse is linked to violence. Herkov testified alcohol abuse could be a factor in aggressive behavior and abuse, but that drinking doesn't make someone a batterer.

After Day's cross-examination of Herkov, prosecutors rested their case.

Closing arguments are scheduled to begin Thursday. Prosecutors and the defense on Wednesday reviewed instructions to be given to the jury at the end of closing arguments, including other charges the jury could consider in the case.

Jurors will be instructed that they may consider a lesser charge of manslaughter instead of the second-degree murder charge if they think Troemner killed Smith intentionally but without malice.

For a second-degree murder conviction, the jury would need to believe Troemner knew her actions would result in Smith's harm or death yet she continued anyway and did so with malice.

Both charges indicate the stabbing was not premeditated.

But for the jury to find Troemner guilty of either, they would need to consider Troemner's state of mind and whether she was aware in the moment that she was acting in a manner that would cause harm or death to Smith.

Jurors also will be instructed to consider whether Troemner had the right to justifiable use of deadly force.

Troemner previously testified she was afraid Smith would kill her the night of the stabbing. Under Florida law, having such a fear may justify using or threatening deadly force if a person is defending himself or herself against death, great bodily harm or a felony.

More coverage in the trial of Lisa Troemner:

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