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Jan. 6 committee examines how Capitol riot unfolded – and how to prevent it from happening again

House committee issues subpoenas, hears testimony, and questions Trump's inaction during Capitol attack

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Allies, associates and supporters of former President Donald Trump are the focus of a House committee investigating the deadly Jan. 6, 2021, attack on Capitol Hill. Trump himself could be next.

In the six months since its creation, the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol has subpoenaed 49 individuals and amassed more than 35,000 pages of documents. 

Of those subpoenas, 22 (45%) were issued to people connected to Trump, including administration staff and advisers. The recipients include high-profile figures including Steve Bannon, Roger Stone, Michael Flynn and Mark Meadows.

Who's received subpoenas from Jan. 6 committee?

Who's received subpoenas from Jan. 6 committee?

Four organizations have also been subpoenaed: Proud Boys, Oath Keepers, 1st Amendment Praetorian and Stop the Steal.

USA TODAY reports the committee is looking at whether Trump defaulted on his oath of office to protect and defend the Constitution, which could have criminal consequences, according to Chairman Bennie Thompson.

Who are Jan. 6 committee members?

Who are Jan. 6 committee members?

This is a timeline of what the committee has done so far:

July 27, 2021

July 27, 2021

In the committee’s first hearing, four law enforcement officers – two Capitol Police and two District police officers – testify about what they suffered during the Jan. 6 riot.

Aug. 25

Aug. 25

The committee seeks Jan. 6-related records from eight federal agencies, seeking details on agency intelligence before the attack, security preparations, defense plans for the Capitol, and other information.

Aug. 27

Aug. 27

The committee seeks Jan. 6-related records from 15 social media companies, including Facebook, Twitter and Google, going back to the spring of 2020. It also asks for information on company policy changes on the spread of false information, violent extremism, and foreign influence.

Sept. 23

Sept. 23

Committee chairman Bennie Thompson subpoenas documents and testimony from four individuals with close ties to former president Donald Trump who were working in the White House or communicating with it in the days before Jan. 6:

Sept. 29

Sept. 29

The committee subpoenas testimony and records from 11 individuals connected to rally organization. One of them is a former Trump campaign official.

  • Amy Kremer, founder and Chair of Women for America First.
  • Kylie Kremer, founder and Executive Director of WFAF.
  • Cynthia Chafian, who "submitted the first permit application on behalf of WFAF for the January 6th rally, and founder of the Eighty Percent Coalition."  
  • Caroline Wren, listed on permit paperwork for the January 6th rally as “VIP Advisor.”
  • Maggie Mulvaney, listed on permit paperwork for the January 6th rally as “VIP Lead.”
  • Justin Caporale, of Event Strategies, Inc., listed on permit paperwork for the January 6th rally as “Project Manager.”
  • Tim Unes, of Event Strategies, Inc., listed on permit paperwork for the January 6th rally as “Stage Manager.”
  • Megan Powers, of MPowers Consulting LLC, listed on permit paperwork for the January 6th rally as “Operations Manager for Scheduling and Guidance.”
  • Hannah Salem, of Salem Strategies LLC, listed on permit paperwork for the January 6th rally as “Operations Manager for Logistics and Communications.”
  • Lyndon Brentnall, of RMS Protective Services, listed on permit paperwork for the January 6th rally as “On-Site Supervisor.”
  • Katrina Pierson, a former Trump campaign official, who was "reportedly involved in the organization of the January 5th and 6th rallies and was in direct communication with the former President  about the rallies."
Oct. 7

Oct. 7

The committee subpoenas testimony and records from two individuals, Ali Abdul Akbar, also known as Ali Alexander, and Nathan Martin, connected to the "Stop the Steal" rally that took place in Washington on Jan. 6.

Oct. 8

Oct. 8

Steve Bannon won't cooperate with the committee, his lawyer says, citing a claim of executive privilege by former president Donald Trump.

Oct. 13

Oct. 13

The committee subpoenas Jeffrey Clark, a former Justice Department who reportedly tried to help overturn the 2020 presidential election.

Oct. 14

Oct. 14

The committee says it'll recommend criminal contempt charges for Bannon.

Oct. 21

Oct. 21

House of Representatives votes 229-202 to hold Bannon in contempt of Congress.

Nov. 8

Nov. 8

The committee subpoenas six staffers "involved in efforts to promote false claims of election fraud or overturn the results of the 2020 election"

Nov. 9

Nov. 9

The committee subpoenas 10 former Trump administration officials:

Nov. 15

Nov. 15

A federal grand jury indicts Bannon on two counts of contempt of Congress for refusing to provide testimony and documents to the committee. Trial is set for July 18.

Nov. 22

Nov. 22

The committee subpoenas five people connected to Washington rallies on Jan. 5 and 6:

Nov. 23

Nov. 23

The committee subpoenas three organizations and three individuals:

  • Proud Boys International, L.L.C., who "called for violence leading up to Jan. 6, and at least 34 individuals affiliated with the Proud Boys have been indicted by the Department of Justice in relation to the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol;"
  • Henry “Enrique” Tarrio, who was chairman of the Proud Boys during the Jan. 6 attack;
  • Oath Keepers, an organization which was "similarly involved in planning and participating in the violent attack on the Capitol on Jan. 6;"
  • Elmer Stewart Rhodes, president of the Oath Keepers;
  • 1st Amendment Praetorian, an organization "that provided security at multiple rallies leading up to Jan. 6;"
  • Robert Patrick Lewis, chairman of 1st Amendment Praetorian.
Dec. 10

Dec. 10

The committee subpoenas six people who either helped stage Jan. 5-6 rallies in Washington or communicated with Trump about the Jan. 6 rally.

Dec. 14

Dec. 14

The House votes 222-208 to hold Mark Meadows, former White House chief of staff, in criminal contempt of Congress for refusing to comply with a committee subpoena.

Dec. 16

Dec. 16

The committee subpoenas James Waldron who "appears to have been involved with efforts to promote claims about fraud in the 2020 election."

Dec. 20

Dec. 20

The committee asks Rep. Scott Perry, R-Pa. 10th District, for information on his role "in the efforts to install Jeffrey Clark as acting Attorney General."

Dec. 22

Dec. 22

The committee asks Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio 4th District, for information on his reported communication with Trump on Jan. 6 and his "efforts to challenge the results of the 2020 election in the weeks prior."

Jan. 4, 2022

Jan. 4, 2022

The committee asks Fox News host Sean Hannity to answer questions about text messages he sent to Trump and White House staff in the days surrounding the riot.

Jan. 9

Jan. 9

Jordan says he's refusing to cooperate with the committee and calls the investigation a “partisan witch hunt” by Democrats. "Even if I had information to share with the Select Committee, the actions and statements of Democrats in the House of Representatives show that you are not conducting a fair-minded and objective inquiry," Jordan wrote.

Who are the Jan. 6 committee members?

Who are the Jan. 6 committee members?

The committee was originally envisioned as a bipartisan independent commission, similar to the one that investigated the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Congressional Republicans rejected the plan.

House Democrats then created a special investigative committee, with seven Democrats and two Republicans and a staff of about 40 people. The House approved it, by 222-190 vote on June 30, 2021.

Its duties include writing reports on what happened Jan. 6 and making recommendations to prevent another attack from happening again.

SOURCE USA TODAY Network reporting and research; Associated Press; Department of Justice; house.gov. 

PHOTOS AP; AFP and Getty Images

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